Did you know that napping can be an early Alzheimer’s warning sign?

Tired.

Senior sitting and sleeping. 

Researchers at the University of California (several campuses), and University of Sao Paulo recently found that if you need to nap more than usual, and if your nap time is getting longer than it used to be, it might be an early warning sign that you could develop Alzheimer’s disease.

Even if they’ve had a full night’s sleep, many people with Alzheimer’s will sleep a lot during the day. Now, based on this new finding, researchers are considering that examining daytime napping might help predict the future onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

The researchers were concerned about what comes first: sleep changes that play role in the development of Alzheimer’s or if changes in a person’s sleep pattern is indicative of the beginning of Alzheimer’s.

Dr. Lea Grinberg, senior author of the findings, which appear in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia, explains that her team found evidence that an entire network of neurons that keeps us awake is wiped out by the accumulation of tau proteins which form tangles that disrupt communication between brain cells.

The researchers studied postmortem brain tissue of 13 deceased Alzheimer’s patients who had donated their brain to research and compared them to others without the disease. They found that in the Alzheimer’s brains the three areas of the brain that keep us awake (the locus coeruleus, the lateral hypothalamic area, and the tuberomammillary nucleus) had lost 75% of their neurons.

Researchers found “considerable amounts of tau inclusions” in the awakening areas of the brain, the study said.

Tau is a protein whose normal function is to stabilize a particular part of the neuron in all species. In the brain of someone with Alzheimer’s, tau acts abnormally and destabilizes the neuron. The build-up of tau protein is one of the main culprits of Alzheimer’s disease.

The researchers said that it’s unclear how long it takes to notice memory loss after sleep pattern changes occur.

Sadly, the study’s lead author Jun Oh said in an article by Maria Cohut published in Medical News August 18, 2019, said that “It’s remarkable because it’s not just a single brain nucleus that’s degenerating, but the whole wakefulness-promoting network. Crucially, this means that the brain has no way to compensate because all of these functionally related cell types are being destroyed at the same time.”

As a result of this study and one in the past, she said, they have received funding to keep looking into changes in sleep patterns before memory loss begins.

The NIH and Rainwater Charitable Foundation are investing $1.4 million per year to this research group to continue their research into other areas of the brain responsible for promoting sleep and the areas that regulate circadian rhythm, as well as sleep pattern changes that occur before memory loss begins.

Until we know more, if napping is a normal part of your routine,  you don’t have to worry about taking a mid-day or mid-morning siesta. But if your pattern has changed, it might be a good idea to make an appointment with your physician to discuss your sleep habits and to rule out other medical conditions.

In the meantime, make sure your sleep hygiene is optimal. Click here for 16 ways to sleep better.

Good night, sleep tight.


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

The 20 most important things to consider when looking for a memory care home

seniorenheim 6The day I moved my husband into a memory care home was the second worst day of my life. The worst day was the day he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. And both of those days were worse than the day he died.

After the diagnosis, I didn’t waste any time getting our finances sorted out, talking to an elder attorney about options, and learning about Medicare benefits. I did, however, wait a year before I contacted that Alzheimer’s Association. That was a mistake because this amazing association offers so much good information and support. So do yourself a favor and contact your local chapter and take advantage of all the free classes and support groups they offer.

After several years of caring for my husband at home, and downsizing to a more manageable home, I was advised to start looking for a memory care home in case an emergency situation arose.  I wanted to keep my husband at home as long as possible. But things happen, and in my case, I received a serious diagnosis. My doctor said that I needed to take care of myself and I listened to him. I got recommendations about a few homes in my town, found one I liked, and put my husband on the waiting list.

Many facilities will allow you to get on a waiting list. When your name gets to the top, you might have the option to refuse because you are not ready. In this case, you can move down the list but still have priority over someone who is recently added. Ask about this option.

The home where my husband lived for two years provided good care, but did not live up to the promise of caring for him until the end of his life. In fact, the last month of his life included several moves. After being discharged from the hospital, Morris was sent to a rehab center in a nursing home. It was not a good situation. The food was horrible, and the care was sorely inadequate. After two weeks, I begged the original home to take him back. They agreed to only if I hired additional one-on-one care. I did, but the cost was prohibitive. I moved him again after finding a wonderful end-stage Alzheimer’s unit down the hall from a hospice center. Morris received excellent compassionate care there the last two weeks of his life.

Here’s list of 20 things to look for and ask in your search for a memory care home:

  1. Look at your state’s Public Health and Environment website to see a facility’s number of beds, complaints, medical director, ombudsman’s phone number, and whether the home is Medicare and/or Medicaid certified. Here you can discover things like mishandling of narcotics (oxycodone), and theft of residents’ belongings, etc.
  2. What is the staff to patient ratio? During the day? At night?
  3. Is there a RN (registered nurse) always on the premises? Is a doctor always on call?
  4. How often does a medical doctor visit the facility?
  5. What level of care does the home provide? Can your loved one stay there until the end of his/her life? What if your loved one becomes non-ambulatory?
  6. Are three meals a day provided? What about special diets such as kosher, vegetarian, low-salt?
  7. What type of training has the staff received?
  8. What is the staff turn-over rate?
  9. What is the monthly rate for housing and care? What services does that rate include?
  10. Are rooms private or semi-private? How do prices vary for each?
  11. Is housekeeping and laundry provided? How often?
  12. What programs are offered? Social, educational, outings, exercise?
  13. How secure is the unit? Are residents locked in? Is there any chance a resident can leave and wander? Has this ever happened?
  14. What happens if the resident becomes aggressive or violent? Is he or she drugged? Given a warning that he or she must move out?
  15. What is the chain of communication for letting family members know what is going on with a loved one?
  16. What is the discharge policy?
  17. Are pets allowed?
  18. Are visiting hours limited or open?
  19. What is the protocol for a medical emergency?
  20. Visit the facility and look around. Are the staff appropriately dressed? Are they warm and friendly? Is the environment pleasing and clean? Does the executive director address residents by their name? Would you be comfortable having your loved one live there, and would you be comfortable spending many hours there?

No one ever wants to live in a nursing home or assisted living facility. But when your loved one needs more care than you can provide, is a danger to him or herself, or you, the caregiver, need to take care of yourself, a memory care home can provide a warm and loving option. Good luck finding one that suits your needs and the needs of your loved one.


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.