Caring for yourself and others with good nutrition

Mary Collette Rogers interviewed me on her podcast “The Healthy Kitchen Companion.”

Find out more about Mary’s programs around The New Kitchen Way: cookhappylivehealthy.org/blog/

Discover insights and tools for handling the challenges of caregiving, particularly stress. Sobering statistics highlight the need for addressing this topic: In 2017, fully 16 million friends and family provided 18 billion hours of unpaid care for 5½ million Americans with Alzheimer’s. That figure, of course, accounts for just one of many chronic conditions that required the services of caregivers.

Equally important is the need for self-care since it is said that at some point you’ll either be a caregiver or be cared for yourself. Self-care can minimize the need for care from others, or make it possible to provide care to those you love.

In this conversation, Barbra Cohn and Mary Collette Rogers share a wealth of knowledge and strategies for using the power of good nutrition to alleviate the stress of caregiving–whether for yourself or others.

Barbra, author of Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia, provides solid nutritional advice for
** Introducing the Stress Vitamins and minerals, and foods where they can be found
** How neurotransmitters like serotonin improve mood and how to use natural mood boosters in foods to uplift mood
** Why breakfast is the most important meal of the day for caregivers and key breakfast foods
** Barbra’s secret for boosting immunity, staying hydrated and replenishing nutrients drained by stress

Mary Collette, Healthy Kitchen Companion, explores how to ensure that Barbra’s nutritional wisdom doesn’t just get parked at the kitchen door. With The New Kitchen Way, her integrated approach to meal making, you’ll see good nutrition advice actually show up on your table–deliciously and easily. Learn
** About the power of organization and why it works as well in the kitchen as the business world
** How chaos and lack of control are the true culprits that sabotage kitchen fun and success
** How organization alleviates stress when you invite it into your kitchen and meal making
** How the kitchen and meal making can be broken down into just six areas, and
** How the 6 KitchenSmart Strategies easily guide you to get those six areas under control, leaving you relieved and confident about making nourishing meals.

 

 

Keep your cool with these 10 summertime eating tips

20bb6fee-b988-4716-bd91-23dff6882655It’s summertime and the livin’ is easy—or at least we’d like it to be. This summer is especially hot all over the world. If you’re tired and stressed out from caregiving, these tips will help you stay cooler in summer. The same information applies to those we care for. . . and for everyone.

According to the ancient Indian system of Ayurveda our body consists of three main elements or doshas—Vatta, Pitta and Kapha. Pitta consists of water and fire. It’s hot, so during summer when the temperature rises we want to eat cooling foods. Eating cooling foods not only keeps us from overheating, it reduces the tendency to get irritable, impatient and angry.  (Chapters 20 and 31 in “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey through Alzheimer’s and Dementia” contain more information about ayurveda and nutrition that calms down the nervous system and supports immunity.)

  1. First and foremost, stay hydrated. It’s especially important to make sure you and your loved ones are getting enough liquids because when we forget to drink we can become dehydrated quickly, which leads to other health problems. It’s also crucial to keep the brain hydrated in order to maintain mental alertness. Drink plenty of water and stay away from carbonated and caffeinated drinks. Herbal teas, and fresh fruit or vegetable juices are great in summer. Just remember that fruit juices are high in sugar and calories. Coconut water is cooling and helps to replenish electrolytes, which is especially important during and after an illness.
  2. Enjoy the bounty of summer fruits. Peaches, apricots, cherries, watermelon, cantaloupe, and berries are especially good for helping the body reduce the fiery heat of summer. Juice them or make popsicles with watermelon juice or any other combination including yogurt. These are especially helpful to keep seniors hydrated and for people who have trouble chewing.
  3. According to Ayurveda, some of the recommended summer vegetables include cucumber, green leafy vegetables, green beans, squash, zucchini, asparagus, beets and eggplant. Juice a leafy green with cucumber and beets for a delicious cooling drink.
  4. Sprinkle on the herbs and spices. They’re easy to use and contribute added flavor and antioxidants to your diet. Cooling spices include cardamom, coriander, fennel and tumeric. Cooling herbs include cilantro, mint and dill.
  5. Avoid hot, sour and salty foods including fermented food, red meat, and greasy and spicy food. Excess pitta aggravates the tendency towards heartburn and gastric hyperacidity.
  6. Here’s some good news—Ayurveda recommends ice cream during the hot summer months! So by all means, enjoy! Dementia patients are especially fond of ice cream. If the person you are caring for refuses to eat or eats very little, try serving ice cream. It contains protein, calcium and calories, and it’s easy to serve and eat. If weight gain or cholesterol is a concern, select a dairy-free version of America’s favorite dessert. Rice Cream, Coconut Bliss and Soy Delicious make delicious non-dairy, frozen desserts.
  7. Cooling grains include amaranth, barley, quinoa, rice, tapioca and wheat. Use them in salads mixed with veggies. One of my favorites is quinoa salad. Cook 1 cup of quinoa. (Be sure to rinse it first to remove saponin, a naturally occurring chemical that coats each grain to ward off insects. It has a strong, bitter flavor. And yes, it is a pain to rinse quinoa. First soak it and then place it in a very fine mesh strainer and rinse.)  Sauté onion and zucchini, add a handful of fresh corn cut off the cob, mix with the quinoa. Add fresh tomatoes, black beans, and a dressing made with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Delicious!
  8. Make your own granola. Once you do, you’ll never go back to buying store-bought granola, which is typically filled with sugar. Plus, it is expensive. Oats, almonds, and coconut are all cooling. First toast 1/2 cup of slivered almonds on a cookie sheet in the oven. Watch carefully so they don’t burn. Add to 4 cups of oats, along with 1/2 cup coconut flakes, 1/4 cup coconut oil, 1/4 cup maple syrup. Add 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, if desired. (Cinnamon is warming, but a little bit won’t hurt.) Stir and bake at 325 degrees for about 20 minutes. Add raisins if desired.
  9. For added protein, top your salads with these cooling legumes: garbanzo, pinto, white beans, azuki beans, and black-eyed peas.
  10. If you eat meat try to avoid beef, chicken, and pork during the hot months and use cooling meats such as buffalo, turkey rabbit or venison instead.

Happy eating. . . and stay cool!

12 tips to encourage your Alzheimer’s patient to eat

Seniorin mit BetreuerinIt seems that ice cream is the favorite food of most Alzheimer’s patients. It was certainly my husband’s. Sometimes it was the only thing that he found appealing. It’s no wonder: ice cream is cold, slippery and delicious! However, there are lots of healthy frozen desserts available that are low in fat and calories that contain little or no cholesterol. Try Rice Dream®, Coconut Bliss, Soy Dream, or Halo Top. If you have a food processor, puree frozen strawberries or bananas. You won’t even miss the sugar and cream.

Getting adequate nutrition and even the sheer act of eating can be a challenge for both patients and caregivers. Here’s a list of ways to create a tranquil setting, and some easy-to-eat foods to uplift mood and support immunity for everyone.

  1. Play classical or another type of relaxing music. My husband loved to listen to Nina Simone’s jazzy voice while he ate. Whatever the preference is, play the music softly to create an inviting atmosphere. If your loved one lives in a memory care home, the other residents will probably appreciate the music, as well.
  2. Light a candle. Set the table with a table cloth and vase of flowers. Beauty, color and light always create a magical, calming effect.
  3. Aromatherapy oils including peppermint and spearmint are energizing and might stimulate appetite.
  4. Make the chair as comfortable as possible, especially if the person has a bad back. Place a cushion on the seat and back, if necessary.
  5. Use soft lighting. Replace glaring light bulbs with a warmer color light bulb, or install a dimmer.
  6. It might be hard for the person to differentiate foods on a plate, especially if they are the same color. Use contrasting colors. For example, serve beets and carrots on white instead of white mashed potatoes on a white plate.
  7. If your patient has trouble using a fork and knife, serve finger foods. Sandwiches cut in quarters or even eighths, pieces of fruit rather than whole fruits, baked potatoes cut into chunks, etc. are easier to manage.
  8. Use herbs and spices to flavor foods instead of salt. Herbs and spices have healing benefits. For instance, basil can relieve gas and soothe stomach upsets. Cinnamon has a tranquilizing effect that helps reduce anxiety and stress. It also helps regulate blood sugar. Dill soothes the digestive tract and reduces heartburn. Mint promotes digestion and boosts mental alertness.
  9. Puree soups such as split pea, potato/leek. cauliflower, and vegetable, and serve with a wide straw, if necessary. This relieves the chore of chewing and helps hydrate as well as nourish the patient.

One of my all-time favorite recipes is for Indian kicheree, also called a “meal in a pot.”

This traditional soup is wonderful during times of stress, stomach upset, and any time the appetite is diminished due to sickness or stress.

Kicheree

4 Tbs organic Basmati rice

4 Tbs mung dal or red lentils

4 1/2 cups water (more or less, depending on whether you like it soupy or thick)

2 tsp grated fresh ginger

2 Tbs fresh lemon juice

1 cup assorted veggies cut bite-sized (zucchini, yam, carrot, cauliflower, broccoli, etc.)

1 tsp ground coriander seed

1 tsp ground cumin seed

1/4 tsp turmeric

salt and pepper to taste

Combine the rice, dal ginger, veggies and water in pot. Add the spices. Bring to a boil over medium heat; then lower to a simmer for 45-50 minutes. Add water if it gets too thick. Remove from the stove. Add the lemon juice, salt and pepper.

10. Protein shakes are nutritious, filling, and nourishing. Use ingredients of your choice without relying on the sugary nutrition drinks that are generously handed out in institutions. Bananas, strawberries, blueberries, kale, spinach, peanut butter, coconut milk, almond milk, hemp milk, soy milk, and cow’s milk are some of the popular ingredients to try. Protein powders are concentrated sources of protein from animal or plant foods, such as dairy, eggs, rice or peas. The most popular include whey, casein, egg, pea, hemp, brown rice, and mixed plant proteins.

11. Offer healthy snacks throughout the day such as cheese and apple slices, nut butter on apples slices, fresh fruit, humus and carrot sticks.

12. Eggs are my favorite “go to” food for protein. They are easy to eat, can be made in a variety of ways and contain 13 essential vitamins and minerals! Vitamin D for bone health and immune function, lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidants important for reducing the risk of cataracts and macular degeneration, vitamins B 12 and B6, thiamin, riboflavin, folate, choline, vitamin E, vitamin A, iron, zinc and more. Add pureed veggies for extra vitamins and minerals. Devil eggs are always a hit as a delicious and highly nutritious snack.

For hundreds of other caregiving tips, read “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s and Dementia”

 

image.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 reasons to eat chocolate on Valentine’s Day and throughout the year

Valentine's Day card and confectionery.Americans buy more than 58 million pounds of chocolate around the holiday of love. Besides the delicious taste, smell and aphrodisiac effects, researchers are continually discovering more health benefits.

The use of cacao for health benefits dates back at least 3000 years. It was revered as a food, medicine and currency in Mexico, Central and South America, where it was also celebrated and incorporated into artwork, legends and sacred rituals. Now, because of extensive research, we know the main health benefits of cacao come from the flavonol epicatechin. The process of manufacturing dark chocolate retains epicatechin, whereas milk chocolate does not contain significant amounts. You can have your chocolate and eat it too, but if you want to enjoy its extensive health benefits be sure to eat high-quality dark chocolate. Or go one step further and enjoy raw cacao, which might take some getting used to for the simple reason we are used to sweetened chocolate. And if you just want the pure and simple health benefits, forego the chocolate and take raw cacao capsules. Although I definitely wouldn’t recommend giving your sweetheart a bottle of cacao capsules on Valentine’s Day. Indulge in the good-tasting stuff!

  1. Chocolate is an aphrodisiac. Legend has it that the Aztec emperor Montezuma was said to consume large amounts of the cocoa bean to fuel his libido. Today, scientists attribute the aphrodisiac qualities of chocolate to two chemicals: 1) tryptophan, which is a building block of serotonin, a brain chemical involved in sexual arousal. And, 2) phenylethylamine, a stimulant related to amphetamine, that is released in the brain when people fall in love. What about you? Do you experience a heightened sense of arousal after eating dark chocolate?
  2. Chocolate contains good-for-you antioxidants Chocolate comes from the cacao bean, which thrives in hot, rainy climates in South America, Africa and Indonesia. Similar to grapes, the local soil and climate affects the taste of the harvested beans. When you buy a chocolate bar that has the percentage number on the bar wrapper, that represents the weight that comes from the cacao bean content, according to Robert L. Wolke, author of What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained. The higher the number, the lower the percentage of sugar and the more bitter and complex the flavor, he says. And the higher the number the more antioxidants.
  3. Cacao is rich in magnesium, sulfur, calcium, iron, zinc, copper, potassium and manganese, all essential minerals . . . and antioxidants that support immune health.
  4. Chocolate reduces your risk of Type 2 Diabetes Researchers discovered that the flavanols in chocolate have beneficial effects on insulin resistance, a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. In a 30-year-long study of 953 men and women from the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS), researchers found that the individuals who never or rarely ate chocolate had a significantly higher chance of developing Type 2 diabetes after five years when compared to individuals who ate chocolate more than once a week. Habitual chocolate intake and type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study: (1975-2010): Prospective observations.
  5. Protects you from heart disease A 2012 report published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that dark chocolate has a beneficial effect on blood pressure, vascular dilation and cholesterol levels, and can play a role in reducing metabolic precursors that lead to diabetes and eventually to heart disease. However, a study published in October 2016 (John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.) found that out of 32 cocoa product samples analyzed, the cocoa flavanol dose must be about 900 mg or above to decrease blood pressure, and contain 100 mg of epicatechin. So if you want to eat chocolate for health benefits, be sure to check the ingredient label. The aim of the study was to review the effect of cocoa flavanols on cardiovascular health, with emphasis on the doses ingested, and to analyze a range of cocoa products for content of these compounds. PubMed was searched from 2010 to locate systematic reviews (SR) on clinical effects of chocolate consumption.
  6. Supports mental function In a study carried out by the University of L’Aquila in Italy, 90 elderly participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) drank cocoa containing high, medium or low levels of flavanoids. At the end of the eight-week study researchers found improvements in the motor response, working memory, task switching, and verbal memory in the participants who drank cocoa with a higher flavanol content. (Hypertension, Aug. 14, 2012) Alzheimer’s and dementia patients are especially fond of sweets because the taste of sweetness is the last taste to disappear.  So if your loved one has Alzheimer’s or dementia, indulge him/her in chocolate. Just remember not to overdo it and make sure to include good dental hygiene in your loved one’s daily regimen.
  7. Helps you think better after a sleepless night The next time you have a bad night’s sleep, instead of indulging in a cup of Joe drink hot chocolate. Sleep deprivation is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and scientists have found that flavanol-rich chocolate counteracted vascular impairment after sleep deprivation and restored working memory performance. Their theory is that the study’s participants had improved cognitive performance because of the effects of cocoa flavonoids on blood pressure and blood flow.Flavanol-rich chocolate acutely improves arterial function and working memory performance counteracting the effects of sleep deprivation in healthy individuals.
  8. Makes you feel gooood Scientists have discovered why chocolate uplifts your mood. Serotonin is the neurotransmitter responsible for keeping us happy, and cacao stops the amino acid tryptophan from breaking down. Since tryptophan is one of the amino acids that make serotonin this, in turn, limits the breakdown of serotonin. (Frontiers in Experimental Pharmacology and Drug Discovery, Dec. 2013)

On Valentine’s Day celebrate with your loved one by enjoy a steaming cup of delicious hot chocolate made with whole milk or rice or flax milk. Or indulge in a dark chocolate truffle, candy bar or chocolate ice cream. It’ll boost your spirit and your immunity. Just be careful not to overdo it because the calories can add up quickly.

As an added treat, make this yummy chocolate souffle. (Substitute coconut sugar, or raw sugar, if you like.)  It’s easier than you think.

Chocolate Souffle

Ingredients

  • 1⁄3 cup sugar, plus additional for sprinkling
  • 5 ounces bittersweet chocolate chips
  • 3 large egg yolks, at room temperature
  • 6 large egg whites
  • 1⁄8 tablespoon butter

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 375°F.
  • Measure out sugar, chocolate and separate eggs.
  • Butter soufflé dish entirely and then add sugar (additional) coating the entire dish.
  • Melt chocolate in a double boiler, or directly on the stove.
  • Add yolks to chocolate (this will harden the chocolate so don’t be alarmed).
  • Beat egg whites with a pinch of salt. Slowly add sugar, a little at a time. Beat until egg whites hold stiff peaks.
  • Fold white mixture into chocolate slowly and stir until smooth.
  • Pour into large soufflé dish or 4 ramekins and run the end of your thumb around inside to remove any extra batter.
  • Bake until puffed and crusted on top but still jiggly in center, 20 to 25 minutes.
  • Serve immediately with whipped cream or ice cream.

Yay chocolate!


For healthy and nutritious recipes and dozens of ways to reduce stress, feel happier and healthier and sleep more soundly, read Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s and Dementia.   Available on Amazon and at all bookstores that sell quality books.

BarbraCohn__

 

6 healing soups to help you get through the cold and flu season

fresh soup 1January is National Soup month. It’s also the month when there are a lot of colds and flues. This year there is an especially bad flu affecting seniors and young children. It’s important to support your immune system, get plenty of sleep, and try to maintain an uplifted mood.

Winter soups can warm us, strengthen us, help heal us and protect us from getting sick.  Home-made soup contains fresh ingredients that have more antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and protein. Canned soups are typically overcooked, high in sodium, and can have additives and preservatives. A big pot of soup will last several days, saving time in the kitchen. It is also an easy-to-eat, easy-to-digest form of nutrition for patients with a chronic illness such as Alzheimer’s, and for those bed-ridden with the flu.

If you’re lucky, your grandmother or mother gave you their delicious soup recipes. Here are some of my favorites for nourishing the body and soul during the cold winter months.

Immune boosting soups

Tomato Vegetable Soup

  • 2 cans whole tomatoes (organic, chopped)
  • 2 onions (sautéed)
  • 6 cloves garlic (pressed and sautéd)
  • 1⁄2 tsp oregano (dried)
  • 1 medium winter squash (peeled and cut into chunks)
  • 1 medium rutabaga (chopped)
  • 1 bunch turnips (chopped greens and roots)
  • 1 pound zucchini (cut into chunks)

Add water to cover and simmer until done. Serve with brown rice or couscous.

Miso Stew

  • 5 cups water
  • 1/2 cup dried quinoa, rinsed
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp-sized chunk minced ginger
  • 2 stalks chopped celery
  • 2 carrots chopped
  • 1 cup chopped kale
  • 1/4 cup torn pieces combo/arame/nori seaweed (your choice)
  • 2 eggs (optional)
  • 1/4 cup organic red or white miso
  • 3 tsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne

Saute onion until soft in 2 tsp of the sesame oil. Add garlic and cook for a few minutes. Bring water, quinoa and carrots to a boil.  Reduce  to medium and add onion, garlic, ginger, celery and seaweed (if it’s a firm variety). Cook for five minutes. Crack eggs into pot and stir gently. When egg is mostly cooked, remove from heat and add kale and any tender seaweed. In a separate bowl mix miso, the remaining sesame oil, turmeric and cayenne. Add a large spoonful of broth (not boiling) and stir until smooth. When pot of soup has cooled enough to touch, add in miso mixture and serve hot. This soup can be reheated but do not boil the miso because this will kill the beneficial enzymes.

Chicken soup (Jewish penicillin)

  • 1 large whole chicken
  • 4 carrots chopped
  • 3 stalks celery chopped
  • 2 medium parsnips chopped
  • 2 medium rutabagas
  • 1 large onion chopped
  • small bunch of fresh dill
  • 2 Tbs salt, or salt to taste

Wash the chicken inside and out, remove any feathers and place in a large pot. Cover the chicken with water. Bring the liquid to a boil, lower the heat, and for the next several minutes, remove any scum that rises to the surface. Add the vegetables and salt.

Cover the pan partially and simmer the soup for 2-1/2 hours or until the chicken meat is very soft when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife. Pour the soup through a strainer or colander into a large bowl or a second pot. Set the chicken and vegetables aside. Remove the fat from the surface of the liquid with a spoon or fat-skimming tool.

For best results, refrigerate the strained soup; when it is cold, the fat will rise to the surface and harden and you can scoop it off. (Refrigerate the vegetables and the chicken separately.) Serve the soup plain or with the vegetables and boned, cut-up chicken.

Ward off the negative effects of stress

Mineral Broth

This broth helps to alkalinize the body and warm the system. It also helps counter the negative effects of stress. Have it as a bowl of soup, or sip it throughout the day.

Wash with a scrub brush and cut into 1-inch chunks:

  • 1 medium potato (any variety, raw with skin)
  • 1 cup zucchini
  • 1 cup cabbage
  • 1 cup green beans
  • 2 cups celeryCut into strips:
  • 1 cup kale or collard greens
  • 1 cup onion 

 

Coarsely chop:

  • a small bunch of dill weed
  • 1 clove garlic

Place ingredients in a large pot with a lid. Cover with  water, just to the level of the vegetables and add:

  • 6 slices fresh ginger root
  • 1/4 cup or more seaweed (dulse, nori, wakame, hiziki, kombu)
  • Seasonal greens (kale, mustard, spinach, broccoli)

 

Bring the water to a boil, then turn down to a simmer, and cover for three to ve hours. Strain the broth with a colander. Let cool before refrigerating or freezing. Will keep in fridge for five to seven days or in the freezer for four months.

Variations:

  • Add cubed sweet potato to soup mix in the beginning of cooking time.
  • Add 1⁄2 tsp. curry 10 minutes before serving for a zesty flavor.

Alleviate joint and inflammation

Bone broth

  • 6 pounds of any kind of bones (beef, chicken, etc.)
  • 3 cups of your favorite vegetables, chopped (carrots, celery, onion, potatoes, etc.)
  • 1 bunch flat parsley
  • 1 bunch fresh thyme
  • 1 head garlic, halved crosswise
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • 1 Tbs vinegar*
  • pepper and salt to taste

Rinse the bones in a large pot with cold water. Drain the water and place the bones back in the pot. Cover with at least 4 inches of cold water and cook over medium-high heat for about 45 minutes until the liquid boils. Reduce heat to medium.

Simmer until broth looks clear, about 1 hour. Skim the fat off occasionally using a ladle. Add the rest of the ingredients and simmer for 2 hours. Skim off fat and discard bits of meat. Then pour the broth through a fine-mesh strainer. Discard the solids. Cool before storing. This broth can be sipped throughout the day. It will keep in the refrigerator for 3 days. It can also be frozen in BPA-free bags, glass jars and BPA-free plastic containers.

* You must add some vinegar to the pot of soup in order to force the calcium in the bones to dissolve from the bones into the soup juice. Just 1 pint of soup can give you as much as 1,000 milligrams of calcium.

Ayurvedic healing soup

This traditional soup is wonderful during times of stress, stomach upset, and any time the appetite is diminished due to sickness or stress.

Kicheree

  • 4 Tbs organic Basmati rice
  • 4 Tbs mung dal or red lentils
  • 4 1/2 cups water (more or less, depending on whether you like it soupy or thick)
  • 2 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • 2 Tbs fresh lemon juice
  • 1 cup assorted veggies cut bite-sized (zucchini, yam, carrot, cauliflower, broccoli, etc.)
  • 1 tsp ground coriander seed
  • 1 tsp ground cumin seed
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • salt and pepper to taste

Combine the rice, dal ginger, veggies and water in pot. Add the spices. Bring to a boil over medium heat; then lower to a simmer for 45-50 minutes. Add water if it gets too thick. Remove from the stove. Add the lemon juice, salt and pepper.

Enjoy!

For more great information about how you can reduce stress, feel happier, more energetic, healthier, deal with issues of grief and depression, and ultimately experience inner peace, read Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s and Dementia.   Available on Amazon and at all bookstores that sell quality books.

BarbraCohn__