Why it’s important to get an early diagnosis when cognitive problems appear

Doctor talking with patient

There were several indications that something was wrong with my husband two years before he was diagnosed. This tall, good-looking man, a graduate of the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, was having trouble calculating how much tip to leave a waitress. When we went to Spain for our twenty-fifth anniversary, Morris couldn’t figure out how much money the hotel would cost in dollars. This man, who once memorized trains and airplane schedules without even trying, followed me around the city like a puppy dog as we boarded a subway or bus enroute to tourist attractions.

That following fall — our daughter’s last year in high school — Morris couldn’t give directions to a friend who was taking the SAT at the high school my husband had attended. I got out the map to help him, but he couldn’t read the map. That was the moment I knew something was very wrong. When he left for a road trip to California without our son and forgot his suitcase, I sat on the stairs and cried. I couldn’t deny it any longer. I had a strong suspicion that Morris had Alzheimer’s disease, and although I pleaded with him for two years to see a neurologist, he refused.

What if he had gotten an early diagnosis? Would it have helped?

There’s no way to know for sure, but probably it would have. Because as soon as he started taking Aricept he stopped getting lost driving around our small city. And I started giving him nutritional supplements, which also seemed to help. Read “5 Things that Help Dementia that your Doctor Probably Hasn’t Mentioned.” https://barbracohn.com/2019/09/25/5-things-that-help-dementia-that-your-doctor-probably-hasnt-mentioned/

Professionals, both researchers and physicians and the Alzheimer’s Association, recommend that an early, accurate diagnosis is the key to living a less stressful life for both the patient and the family.

Here’s why:

  1. Cognitive problems can be caused by a number of physical conditions other than Alzheimer’s disease, vascular cognitive impairment, Lewy Bodies dementia and Frontotemporal dementia (FTD). These include thyroid problems, hydrocephalus, a brain tumor, and even depression. When my mother was severely dehydrated and hospitalized with a urinary tract infection (UTI), a psychiatrist called to tell me that she had full-blown dementia. “No she doesn’t,” I said. And sure enough, after being put on an IV saline drip Mom regained her full mental capacity. Memory problems can result from dehydration, severe diabetes and some forms of Parkinson’s disease, traumatic brain injury, HIV, and Huntington’s disease.

Certain medications can affect mental clarity and balance. Be sure to ask your pharmacist about drug contraindications, and interactions with natural supplements. Alcohol abuse and binge drinking can destroy brain cells that are critical for memory, thinking, and decision making and mimic or lead to dementia.

2. Cognitive symptoms may be reversible. There are a number of holistic doctors who claim that their protocol can treat the root cause of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. Please read my blog ” Significant study points to MIND diet for improving brain health and preventing Alzheimer’s disease.” https://barbracohn.com/2018/11/09/significant-study-points-to-mind-diet-for-improving-brain-health-and-preventing-alzheimers-disease/

Dale Bredesen, MD, a physician scientist in the Department of Pharmacology at UCLA who’s published more than 220 papers on Alzheimer’s, has spent 30 years looking at the root causes of the neurodegenerative phenomenon in hopes of eradicating it. In 2018, Bredesen published the case studies of more than 100 patients in cognitive decline in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease & Parkinsonism. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/reversal-of-cognitive-decline-100-patients-2161-0460-1000450.pdf

In her editorial in the Lancet Neurology, published in May 2020, Joanna Hellmuth, MD, of the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, said the “Bredesen protocol” – named by neurologist Dale Bredesen, MD – has reeled in patients and their families seeking hope outside of the physician’s office for a disease that is currently incurable.

The Bredesen protocol is propounded in his 2017 bestseller The End of Alzheimer’s Program and can be accessed for $1,399, which includes protocol assessments, lab tests and contact with practitioners, who provide the regimen for additional fees. Online support and cognitive games are available for an additional monthly charge. This protocol is timely, costly and requires steadfastness. But if you have the time and means, it’s probably worth a try.

3. An early diagnosis is empowering. Before the disease has progressed to the point where decision making is difficult, the patient can be included in financial and estate planning, creating end-of-life wishes and durable power of attorney decisions, etc.

4. An early diagnosis is easier for the physician to make when the patient is able to answer questions. Later in the progression of the disease, the patient isn’t able to make observations or answer accurately.

5. Family and loved ones who might be confused by particular behaviors such as anger, depression, disinterest, can better understand why their parent or spouse or significant other is behaving the way they are. This helps to preserve the person’s dignity rather than have someone close to them yell at them, treat them poorly, or want to distance them self, etc.

6. Individuals diagnosed early can take advantage of support groups, and caregivers can learn ways to better manage medications, and learn strategies for coping with unexpected and unusual behaviors and the ordinary progression of the disease. The Alzheimer’s Association was a godsend for me. I was able to connect with other caregivers who knew exactly what I was going through. I could talk about what was happening all day with my best friend, but there was no way she would be able to fully understand the stress of caregiving and the grief of losing a partner to Alzheimer’s. https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/research_progress/clinical-trials/about-clinical-trials

7. Getting an early diagnosis provides the opportunity to possibly enroll in a clinical trial. TrialMatch is a clinical trial matching service for Alzheimer’s and other dementias. It is a free, easy-to-use service that connects individuals living with AD, caregivers, and healthy volunteers with current research studies. Their continuously updated database of AD clinical studies includes hundreds of pharmacological and non-pharmacological studies being conducted at sites throughout the U.S. and online.

8. An early diagnosis allows the patient to prioritize what is important to them, whether it’s creating a masterpiece or traveling the world. There is still time at this point in the disease to enjoy a happy, satisfying life.

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Keep your cool with healthy summertime smoothies and popsicles.

Mango banana popsicles on ice
Mango banana popsicles on ice with fresh fruits and berries

It’s hot and you’re probably stressed like most of the world. It’s especially important to keep up with your supplement and exercise regimen, and eat well. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t enjoy the bounty of summer fruits and delicious smoothies and popsicles.

If you’ve been reading my blog for any length of time, you’ve heard me say repeatedly how important it is to stay hydrated — all year-long. It’s even more important during the summer and now during the pandemic.

Our body is 50-65% water. Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated and to flush out toxins. The brain, which is 70% water, gets dehydrated just like your body. When it is dehydrated, neurotransmission — which is heavily dependent on water — is impaired, resulting in poor memory, concentration and impaired abstract thinking. The next time your mind is muddled, drink a tall glass of water and notice the difference.

Stay away from carbonated and caffeinated drinks. herbal teas and fresh fruit or vegetable juices are great in summer. Just remember that fruit juices are high in sugar and calories. Coconut water is cooling and helps to replenish electrolytes, which is especially important during and after an illness.

Enjoy these smoothie and popsicle recipes. They provide hydration, vitamins and minerals, and are perfect for kids as well as for folks with dementia and Alzheimer’s who may forget to eat or lose interest in food.

Popsicles

Watermelon and Kiwi–makes 8

4 kiwis, peeled and sliced

3 cups of pureed watermelon

Place kiwi inside the sides of the popsicle molds. Pour in the watermelon. You can make this with other fruits: watermelon and strawberries, etc. Add basil or mint; lemon or lime juice with or without the rind.

For a beautiful popsicle with 3 layers: Add watermelon puree but leave room for 2 more layers. Freeze for 30 minutes. Take out of the freezer and pour in a small amount of coconut milk, the full-fat canned variety. Freeze again. Take out and add pureed kiwi and freeze. This is a treat for the eyes as well as your taste buds.

Strawberries and Cream–makes 8

2 cups of pureed strawberries (leave some chopped for texture)

2 cups cream of vanilla yogurt.

Blend and freeze.

Coco-Mango–makes 4-6

2 cups pureed mango

1/2 cup canned coconut milk

Optional: Add coconut flakes.

Blend and freeze.

Orange Cream–makes 4-6 popsicles

1 cup orange juice

1 cup vanilla yogurt

Blend together and freeze.

Protein shake recipes

My favorite delicious and easy-to-make shakes

Banana Berry Shake

  • 1 frozen banana
  • ¼ cup sliced strawberries
  • 8 ounces of milk or non-dairy drink such as soy, almond, or coconut milk
  • 1 scoop of whey protein powder
  • Blend together until smooth.

Berry Sunrise Shake

  • 1/3 cup frozen blueberries
  • 3 medium strawberries
  • 8 ounces of orange juice
  • 1 scoop of whey protein powder
  • Blend together until smooth.

Chocolate, Banana, Peanut Butter Protein Shake

  • 1 banana
  • 2 Tablespoons peanut butter
  • 1-cup almond, soy or coconut milk
  • 1 scoop chocolate protein powder
  • 3-5 ice cubes
  • Blend together until smooth

Enjoy!

Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

20 Natural Remedies for Depressed Caregivers (and everyone else)

Forest MeditationLots of us have experienced some form of depression during this pandemic. It may have been fleeting or may have set in for a longer period of time. If you’re a caregiver your “blues” may have cascaded into feelings of anger, resentment, anxiety, and or depression.

If you’re a caregiver you may not feel like it but remember that you are a hero/heroine. You are doing the best you can under duress, whether you’re caregiving during a pandemic or on just an ordinary day during a “normal” year.

Please, if you have suicidal thoughts or just can’t seem to shake the blues, get help.  Call the national suicide prevention lifeline: 1-800-273-8255.  The Lifeline provides 24/7 free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones.

Have you considered getting professional help? Like so many things nowadays, you can even get online therapy sessions. Check out his website for in-depth reviews on the best online therapy. https://www.consumersadvocate.org/online-therapy

Here are 20+ ways to combat depression

Natural supplements for depression

  1. St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is a flowering plant which is used to make liquid extracts, nutritional supplements, and teas. 
  • It is a safe and effective way to treat mild to moderate depression over long periods of time
  • Is similarly effective as standard antidepressants
  • It has minimal side effects when compared to standard antidepressants
  • Understand that it can take 3-6 weeks until you feel the full benefits.
  • Please consult your health practitioner if you are taking an anti-depressant or other medications before taking St. John’s Wort.

One study done on laboratory animals found that St, John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) has antidepressant properties similar to standard antidepressants. The antidepressant profile of H. perforatum is closely related to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors class of antidepressants.

A Swiss study evaluated 440 patients suffering from mild to moderate depression and treated them with 500 mg. of St. John’s wort for up to one year. Although mild side effects such as upset stomach were reported—which may or may NOT have been related to the treatment—the researchers reported that is a safe and effective way to treat mild to moderate depression over long periods of time. They also found that it is especially suitable for preventing a relapse.

A meta-analysis at the Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich, Germany analyzed 29 trials (which included 5,489 patients), comparing St. John’s wort with placebo or standard antidepressants. The evidence suggests that the hypericum extracts tested in the included trials a) are superior to placebo in patients with major depression; b) are similarly effective as standard antidepressants; c) and have fewer side effects than standard antidepressants.

2. Vitamin B complex optimizes cognitive activity and brain function, has a positive effect on memory, learning capacity and attention span, and supports a healthy nervous system and a stable mood. Vitamins B6 and B12, in particular, play a role in the synthesis of serotonin, the neurotransmitter linked to improving memory, lifting mood and regulating sleep.

3. Nervines

According to David Hoffmann, a leading herbalist and spokesperson for a return to herbal medicines, a nervine is a plant remedy that has a beneficial effect upon the nervous system in some way.  Nervines are especially useful during times of stress because they have a strong relaxing and calming effect without producing a dulling, “hang-over” side effect.  They also tone and restore the nervous system to a more balanced state.  Some nervines are also anti-spasmodic, meaning they relax the peripheral nerves and the muscle tissue, which in turn has a relaxing effect on the whole system.

The main types of nervines are tonics, relaxants, and stimulants.

  • Nervine Tonics – are fundamental to any long-term change in the individual’s ability to cope with their lives and make changes to their health regimen and lifestyle. They are particularly helpful for strengthening the nervous system and restoring balance. In addition to having a relaxing effect, they appear to have a vaso-dilating action on the blood vessels of the brain.  This increases oxygen availability to brain cells and helps with mental agility and mood.
  • Nervine Relaxants – are especially beneficial for short-term use, for example in treating mild depression or acute anxiety. “This group of nervines are most important in times of stress and confusion, alleviating many of the accompanying symptoms. They should always be used in a broad holistic way, not simply to tranquilize.  Too much tranquilizing, even that achieved through herbal medication, can in time deplete and weigh heavily on the whole nervous system,” says Hoffman.
  • Nervine Stimulants– are used as a restorative “pick-me-up” when the individual needs an energetic boost without that revved up feeling produced by caffeine.

Recommended nervines:

  • Passion flower- is beneficial for anxiety, insomnia, tension headaches, muscle aches and spasms, pain, hyperactivity, epilepsy, and to alleviate anger and help lower blood pressure.
  • Skullcap – is antispasmodic and relaxing and is recommended to relieve headaches, mood swings, insomnia, premenstrual syndrome, and nervous tension and exhaustion.
  • Blue Vervain – is a nervine herb that may help when you’re feeling overwhelmed and stressed, and just want to relax. It promotes relaxation and calmness.
  • Hops – the female flower from the top of the humulus lupulus creeping vine, does a lot more than make your beer taste good! It may reduce occasional stress, nervousness and restlessness.
  • Valerian – is the most researched herb for sleep. Interestingly, the word valerian is derived from the Latin verb valere, which means to be strong or healthy. It may provide relief of occasional sleeplessness and promote relaxation.
  • Catnip is a milder nervine that may soothe and promote a calming feeling and reduce irritability.

4. Support serotonin levels. Omega 3 fatty acids are rich in DHA, the major unsaturated fat in the brain. Your brain is 60% fat and depends on the fat you ingest from food. Healthy fats found in cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel, sardines, and in olive oil, walnuts, flax and avocado will improve your mood. It is important to cook with a healthy fat such as olive oil, walnut or avocado in order to feed your brain! Canola oil, peanut oil, and safflower are not able to provide you with the fat your brain needs.

As a nutrition educator, I also like to recommend foods that increase the “happy” neurotransmitter serotonin. Whole grains, sweet potatoes, brown rice, oatmeal, buckwheat, millet, quinoa, support your brain’s ability to process more serotonin.

5. Drink water. Your brain needs to stay hydrated. Make sure you drink at least six tall glasses of water every day. When my mom went into the hospital for severe dehydration, among other things, she began hallucinating. A psychiatrist called to tell me “your mom has full-blown dementia.” I said, “No she doesn’t,”  and refused to allow the doctor to prescribe an anti-psychotic prescription. Sure enough, several days later my mom sounded completely normal. Her body had been dehydrated, as well as her brain. The simple habit of drinking water is sometimes all we need to maintain mood and mental health.

6. The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments published a report in the “Canadian Journal of Psychiatry” in 2016 with this conclusion: For the management of mild to moderate depression it says exercise, light therapy, St. John’s wort, omega-3 fatty acids, SAM-e, and yoga are recommended as first- or second-line treatments.

7. A recently published study in the “Journal of Clinical Medicine” concluded that individuals who engaged in a meditative movement practice of Tai Chi, Qigong, or Yoga showed significantly improved treatment remission rates. The researchers conclude that emphasizing the therapeutic effects of meditative movements for treating MDD (Major Depressive Disorder) is critical because it may provide a useful alternative to existing mainstream treatments (drug therapy and psychotherapy) for MDD. Given the fact that meditative movements are safe and easily accessible, clinicians may consider recommending meditative movements for symptomatic management in this population.

8. Music is the universal language as well as one of the most common ways to affect mood.  My husband was never without head phones as he listened to music and wandered through the halls of the memory care home where he lived the last two years of his life. Music made him happy. It makes toddlers spin until they’re dizzy, teens hand bang until their necks get sore, and adults drum their car’s steering wheel. Music also helps decrease anxiety and improves functioning of depressed individuals as found in a meta-analysis that concluded music therapy provides short-term beneficial effects for people with depression. 

9. Dance! I was feeling pretty low the other day. My body hurt and I was lonely. I made myself get off the couch and stream a zumba class on my desktop. Within 30 minutes I felt like a new person.

10. Create a calm environment. Light candles at dinner, play classical music, have a vase of fresh flowers on the table.

11. Take a walk in a green environment, if possible. Forest bathing provides physiological and psychological benefits and there’s plenty of research to back it up.

12. Use aromatherapy oils to immediately diffuse feelings of sadness, depression, anxiety, etc. Lavender oil is the most frequently used fragrance. You can also try bergamot, grapefruit, lemon, orange, clary sage, geranium, rose, and ylang ylang, frankincense, and myrrh. Put the oil in a diffuser or spray bottle to mist your collar or pillow. Check online for ways to order aromatherapy oils. For more information about the use of aromatherapy to reduce stress, improve immunity, reduce agitation, and to promote relaxation read chapter 18 “Aromatherapy” in “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” by Barbra Cohn.

13. Maintain your social connections. Loneliness can actually lead to health problems and mental decline. Join a group—any kind of group: worship,  hiking, scrabble, table tennis, knitting, discussion group or book club. Volunteer at a food bank, soup kitchen or animal shelter. It’s important to stay connected and to feel as though you are a contributing member of society.

14. If you’re lucky to have a caring partner, give each other a massage. It’s a wonderful way to tune out the world and relax. Or do a self massage with warm oil. Olive or coconut works perfectly.

15. Avoid an excess of alcohol, caffeine and sugar. These will just make you feel more jittery in the long run, and add extra calories.

16. Avoid listening to the news before bed. When the coronavirus outbreak first occurred, I found myself glued to the news and I suffered the price. My sleep was restless and I had nightmares. Limit yourself to tuning in 2 or 3 times a day at most, for a limited period of time. Don’t keep the TV or radio on all day, and certainly not while you’re eating or before bed.

17. Limit your social media time, too. There are a lot of scary things on Facebook, etc. While it’s important to stay informed, too much information can overwhelm us and make us even more frightened.

18. Stay in close contact with family and friends. Reach out to those you haven’t been in touch with for a while. Laugh about old times.

19. Watch a comedy or funny You tube videos (cats, dogs, babies) that will make you laugh. Even when we’re depressed, we can laugh. And laughter is the very best medicine.

20. Sleep well by getting to bed before 11:00 pm, eating your last meal before 8pm, turning off your electronic devices, and eliminating light in your bedroom. If you have trouble sleeping consider using a lavender essential oil spray on your pillow or a sachet of lavender inserted into the pillowcase. There are lots of natural sleep aids available at your local health food store, such as melatonin, calcium/magnesium, valerian, hops, etc. Consult with a nutritional consultant about what might work best for you.

“Surround yourself with people who are only going to lift you higher.” anonymous


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Why hydration is crucial, especially during the pandemic

Glass of waterAdipsia is the fancy name for the loss of the sense of thirst. As we get older, our sense of thirst diminishes, just as our sense of smell and taste diminish. Chronic dehydration  is one of the most common problems among seniors and the elderly who reside in care facilities.

If you have a loved one at home with dementia or in a care facility it’s important that you learn the signs of dehydration (below) and offer water or another beverage to your patient every hour and throughout the day.

Many older adults often limit their fluid intake because they may be incontinent or fear accidents. Those who have limited mobility may try to avoid another trip to the toilet. Individuals who have aphasia (inability to speak due to dementia or brain damage from  stroke, etc.) may not be able to express their thirst.

Better monitoring of fluid intake is needed at care facilities

Studies have shown that nearly all nursing home residents suffer from inadequate hydration. Additionally, in one study, 25 out of 40 participants suffered from diseases that may have been caused or exacerbated by their being dehydrated.

If your loved one is in a care facility now—during the COVID-19 pandemic–it is more important than ever to try to encourage them to drink. Ask the staff to put signs up in their room as a reminder. It’s especially important if your loved one has dementia and forgets to drink or is not thirsty.

What happens when you are dehydrated?

Your blood begins to thicken, which interferes with normal blood flow and viscosity. This is one of the reasons why, especially during the  pandemic, it’s crucial to stay hydrated. There have been many reports of blood clots and other cardiovascular episodes in patients with COVID-19. The kidneys, liver, pancreas and other organs can be severely affected from dehydration, and severe dehydration can lead to acute pancreatitis in some individuals.

Dehydration can interfere with brain function

This is a good example of what happens when our brains are dehydrated. My mom wasn’t able to walk the last two years of her life, and was dependent upon two private caregivers. She also drank thickened water, which is a disgusting thickened pudding-like liquid that substitutes for water. The reason?  She aspirated water and food into her lungs, which caused her to cough. Sometimes, the result was pneumonia. She may have felt thirsty and not wanted to bother with the thickened water, or maybe she wasn’t thirsty. But she ended up being severely dehydrated on more than one occasion.

When Mom was admitted to the hospital for a UTI (urinary tract infection), she developed delirium. A psychiatrist called me to report that my mom was exhibiting full-blown dementia. I had just spoken to Mom a day before and she sounded fine. I refused the offer of an antipsychotic drug for her, knowing well the high risk of putting an older adult on those drugs. (see Why you should throw away that antipsychotic drug prescribed for your loved one). As it turned out, my mom was severely dehydrated. After a couple days on a hydrating intravenous solution she returned to her normal self.

It’s important to learn the signs of dehydration in everyone, but especially in seniors and young children. The physical symptoms are usually clear:

  • dry lips and sticky or dry mouth
  • no tears when crying
  • dry, papery skin that tents when it is pressed
  • decreased urine output
  • sunken eyes
  • headache
  • lethargy
  • dark urine
  • extreme thirst
  • unable to sweat
  • fast breath rate
  • low blood pressure
  • the mental symptoms are not as obvious, but can result in mental confusion, irritability, delirium
  • extreme cases of dehydration can lead to loss of consciousness, coma, kidney failure, and seizures.

Ways to stay hydrated

If you are a caregiver (and that includes caring for yourself!) here are some helpful guidelines:

The rule of thumb is to have 48 to 64 ounces of non-sweetened, non-artificially sweetened drinks. Hydration keeps the body in proper pH (how acidic or alkaline your body is) and protects it from getting dehydrated, which is a cause of inflammation and other kinds of imbalances. Dehydration can also contribute to urinary tract infections (UTIs).

  • Encourage and remind your care partner to drink.
  • Drinking healthy fluids is important as eating healthy foods. Water is the top choice, followed by herbal teas, milk, vegetable and fruit juices. Remember that juices contain a lot of sugar, both natural and added, so don’t overdo them. Soups are nourishing and hydrating but be aware of the sodium content. Avoid carbonated and caffeinated drinks which have a diuretic effect.
  • Serve liquids at a temperature that your care partner likes. Not everyone enjoys ice water.
  • Flavor water with lime or lemon.
  • Remind your care partner not to wait until s/he is thirsty. By then s/he is already dehydrated.
  • Serve juicy fruits such as watermelon, which contain lots of water.
  • Offer healthy popsicles as an addition to drinks and to those who refuse water.
  • Smoothies and shakes are nourishing and filling.

The next time your mind is muddled, drink a tall glass of water and notice the difference. Drink plenty of water, fresh juices, and herbal teas to stay hydrated, flush out toxins and enjoy mental clarity. It is especially important now as we head into summer and during the COVID-19 pandemic. But it’s just as important all year round.


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14 Ways to boost your immune system to stave off the VIRUS.

boost your immune systemDear Readers,

This is a crazy time, and there’s a lot of misinformation out there.

I’d like to share time-tested information, and a few new tips I’ve learned from health professionals about ways to boost your immunity . . . and the immunity of the people you lovingly care for.

You’ve heard it a million times: wash your hands, don’t touch your face, stay hydrated and rested, and eat well.

What else should you do?

The mucous membranes—the linings of our nose, throat, sinuses, eustachian tubes, upper respiratory system—-are the body’s first defense against bacteria, viruses and other toxins. Mucous traps the stuff we don’t want inside of us. We sneeze and cough in order to rid ourselves of the “invaders.” We also swallow the invaders. If the good bacteria in our stomach is doing its job, stomach acid will destroy the invaders.  So, you want to keep your mucous membranes hydrated. It’s important they stay moist and lubricated.

  1. Turn on the humidifier if you live in a dry climate. If you don’t have one, consider buying one.
  2. Use a Netti pot or Neil Med sinus rinse with Alkalol, an antimicrobial nasal wash. And please use distilled water, not purified water. This helps clear mucous to support healthier nasal passages.
  3. If your sinuses are congested use an ayurvedic oil in your nostril. Sinus Care & Nasal Oils. You can also use a cooking oil such as sesame, olive, or coconut. Just put a couple of drops of oil in each nostril 3 times a day.
  4. Gargle twice a day with warm salt water or oil. There is an email going around that says it will eliminate the virus. Although I don’t have a scientific reference for this, it’s worth a try.  Oil Pulling is an ayurvedic practice of holding and swishing 1-2 teaspoonfuls of herbalized oil in your mouth for 5-10 minutes. This practice is also said to reduce infection from bacteria and viruses.
  5. Drink water. Lots of it. Forget about sodas and juices. You need to stay hydrated in order to flush the toxins out of your body, and that includes the virus. Herbal tea and coconut water are good, also. Have coconut water on hand just in case you get a fever. It provides electrolytes naturally, without getting artificial color or sugars found in Gatorade.
  6. Take Vitamin D3–2-5,000 IU a day, depending on health and body weight. Please read my article Are You Getting Enough Vitamin D? Most people are not getting enough and that puts us in greater risk for getting the flu, and now COVID-19.
  7. Did you know that 70% of your immune system lies in your gut? Probiotics are live bacterial microorganisms that populate the human gastrointestinal tract. They combat the daily bombardment of toxins and pathogens (bacteria, fungus, parasites, and viruses) that enter our digestive system every day through contaminated food and other toxins. Recent studies show that the bacteria in your gut can also affect your mental health, mood and stress levels. Fermented foods such as kombucha, Greek yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, miso, cottage cheese are probiotics. Probiotic bacteria colonize the digestive tract with good bacteria. Prebiotics are the food and nutrients that feed probiotics. Prebiotic fiber is found in fruits and vegetables such as artichokes, jicama, wild yams, onions and garlic, asparagus, beans, oats, chicory root and Jerusalem artichokes. Prebiotics support mineral absorption, vitamin utilization, and healthy blood sugar levels. Your gut needs both pro- and prebiotics in order to stay healthy and keep you healthy.
  8. Include EFAs (Essential Fatty Acids) in your diet. EPA/DHA from fish, nuts or algae are essential for our brain, nerves and immune system to work efficiently. Under stress, our systems become inflamed so it’s more important now than ever to make sure you’re getting enough. Ways to increase your DHA intake: eat cold-water fish such as wild-caught salmon, sardines and mackerel, at least twice a week. Add flax meal to cereal and baked goods, sprinkle flax oil on your salad, eat a small handful of walnuts at least several times a week.
  9. Take a Multivitamin Mineral for overall added protection. Make sure it is high quality.
  10. Zinc has been shown to inhibit various coronaviruses in a couple of studies. SARS coronavirus, and ZN (2+) inhibits coronavirus.  However, it hasn’t been tested on COVID-19. Still, it is always a good idea to make sure you are taking a zinc supplement, and that doesn’t mean the zinc lozenge. Most people are deficient in zinc. A researcher at the University of Pittsburgh recommends taking 25 mg of zinc morning and evening.
  11. Make sure you’re getting enough Vitamin A. Beta Carotene is the antioxidant of choice for people who are unsure about which vitamin A to take. It is the precursor of vitamin A and can be converted into vitamin A if the body needs it. It gives added protection to the immune system, skin, eyes, and lungs.
  12. Get plenty of Vitamin C-Your body does not manufacture vitamin C on its own, nor does it store it. Since vitamin C is water-soluble, it dissolves in water, and leftover amounts of the vitamin leave your body through urine. That means you need to maintain your vitamin C intake by eating citrus and other fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamin C. Dr. Ed Bauman, founder and president of Bauman College of Nutrition recommends taking a high-quality vitamin C supplement such as Vitamin C with Bioflavonoids: 500 mg. 3-5 x day of Amla (natural vitamin C with bioflavonoids from gooseberry) or 2-4 times that amount of buffered vitamin C from ascorbic acid. Or, take Ascorbyl palmitate. It is a fat-soluble form of vitamin C, which is better absorbed than ascorbic acid, the water-soluble form. It offers all the benefits of ascorbic acid, plus it won’t flush out of the body as quickly as ascorbic acid, and it is able to be stored in cell membranes until the body needs it.
  13. Eat a variety of colored fruits and vegetables. There’s not much left on the grocery store shelves at the moment. But the next time you shop, fill up your cart with fruits and veggies that contain antioxidants and carotenoids to boost your immune system.
  14. Make Healthy Choices

Choose these

  • Water, green tea, herbal teas
  • Nuts & seeds
  • Avocado, olive oil, omega-3 fatty acids
  • Fresh fruits and Veggies
  • Fish, high-quality protein
  • SOUL foods (seasonal, organic, unadulterated, local)
  • Sugar alternatives: stevia, monk fruit, coconut sugar, maple syrup, agave, birch sugar, honey

Avoid these

  • Coffee, soda, artificial sweeteners
  • Chips, cookies, pastries, candy
  • Poor quality fats (hydrogenated,
  • Processed lunch meats
  • Dairy products with rBGH (growth hormones)

Remember this

Whether you’re eating breakfast, lunch, dinner or a snack, always think protein! Protein helps build cells and tissues and supports our strength.

Build your meal around chicken, fish, tofu, cottage cheese or eggs, and then add low-starch vegetables or fruits. The general rule is to eat 3-4 ounces of lean, dense meat or 6 ounces of fish. Women should aim for around 30 grams of protein. Men should aim for around 40 grams of protein. Another rule of thumb is to divide your plate in half. Fill half of the plate with veggies, one quart with a protein, and the other quarter with a whole grain such as quinoa, rice, barley, etc.

Please take care of yourself. And if you are a caregiver, take double care of yourself. You won’t be of help, if you get sick.

All the best to you and your family.

Barbra


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

When your loved one has difficulty eating

senior woman eatingMeals can be challenging for someone with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, not to mention their caregivers. As the disease progresses, it can become difficult for the person to consume enough calories to maintain a healthy weight. But there are ways to encourage healthy eating. Eventually, toward the end of life, it’s natural for humans, and all animals, to lose the desire for food.

As his Alzheimer’s progressed, my husband, had trouble recognizing food items. Morris forgot how to hold a sandwich, and I’d have to place it in his hand. He forgot how to cut his food, so I served it to him already cut into small pieces.

Once when I handed him a sandwich to eat, he asked what it was. I replied, “Chicken salad.” He threw the sandwich across the table and exclaimed, “This chicken is dead!” It was hilarious, and shocking.

But there are ways to encourage your loved one to enjoy food and get good nutrition throughout most of the course of the illness.

Here are some suggestions:

  • Seniors and elders with health issues tend to be hungriest in the morning and eat less as the day progresses. Make a healthy breakfast packed with protein, healthy fat, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Eggs, anywhere you like them, served with avocado, toast, beans, and  greens provides everything needed to establish the beginning of a good day. The same goes for caregivers! You need the strength and energy to get through the day, so start it off with a nutrient- rich breakfast.
  • Setting the table–Put as little on the table as possible in order to not confuse the patient or detract for their ability to clearly see what is in front of them. Use a colorful plate mat, and a white plate so the food stands out. And serve colorful foods, which are higher in antioxidants and vitamins and minerals. Think sweet potatoes, winter squash, corn, beets, greens, etc. Root veggies can be pureed and served in a mash, which is easier to chew and swallow.
  • Make sure the environment is clean and pleasing. Put on some favorite music. It can be stimulating or soothing, depending on the mood.
  • Has the patient kept up with their dental appointments? My mother was always fastidious about dental care, visiting her dentist several times a year for cleanings. But at the end of her life, she began to lose teeth, most likely from poor nutrition. Observe your loved one and make sure there are no signs of pain, grimacing, trouble chewing, etc.
  • Sometimes, a person will not remember that they have eaten just a little while before saying, “When is lunch (or dinner)?” Or, “I’m hungry. When are we going to eat?” Leave their plate on the table longer as a visual reminder. You might have to hide food, if they have the tendency to overeat. And if you want to make sure they, as well as you, are eating the best diet possible, refrain from buying cookies, sweets, chips, and crackers, that are filled with empty calories and hydrogenated fats.
  • Provide a meal companion for your loved one. If you can’t eat with him/her, ask a friend to share a meal. Or, if he/she is still able to eat in a restaurant, have a friend make a weekly lunch date and bring them to a quiet restaurant that serves their favorite food.
  • The taste for sweet things is the last one to go. If your loved one doesn’t have any appetite, it’s almost guaranteed that they will enjoy ice cream. There are lots of options on the market to choose from ranging from traditional ice cream to frozen desserts made with cashew cream, coconut cream and soy milk.
  • Make sure the temperature of the food isn’t too hot or too cold, and that the patient is seated comfortably in a room that is neither too hot or cold.

Dysphagia

Dysphagia is any problem with swallowing. This was a major issue for my dear mother, who, at the end, couldn’t eat without the food going into her lungs instead of her stomach. In determining the extent of dysphasia, the patient does a swallow test drinking liquid of various consistency and thickness.

Food and drink categories

  1. Nectar thick, he consistency of nectar, quickly runs off a spoon
  2. Honey thick, the consistency of honey, slowly drips off a spoon
  3. Pudding thick, the consistency of pudding, plops off a spoon

My mom had to drink water that was thickened, which tasted disgusting. As a result, she often refused to drink and once became dehydrated to the point where she was hospitalized.

If your patient is put on a dysphagia diet, experiment and find ways to keep him or her hydrated. Puree their favorite foods, make shakes that are delicious and nutritious. You can puree just about anything and make it taste good with herbs, tomato sauce, etc. Please don’t add salt. Yogurt and puddings are another good option. Read the labels and try to avoid added sugars. Especially watch out for high sugar content in flavored yogurt.

Poor appetite

If your loved one doesn’t want to eat, accept it as the course of the illness. But if they are still walking and reasonably active, rule out contra-indications of newly administered drugs and illness, such as urinary tract infections.

Additionally, your patient might have a poor sense of smell, which will translate into a poor appetite. Try adding more seasoning to the food, but try to avoid salt and use herbs and spices that include antioxidants such as thyme, basil, oregano, cumin, cinnamon, and cardamom.

Laraine Pounds, R.N., an internationally recognized aromatherapist lists aromatherapy essential oils that stimulate appetite in chapter 18 of my book “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia.”

Eating issues are common amongst individuals with dementia. Experiment with these suggestions and see what makes a difference. Sometimes, just sitting next to someone and offering gentle conversation helps.


 

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

What if your dementia patient becomes abusive, aggressive or violent?

Angry, enraged senior woman yelling at a landline office phone, unhappy with customer service provided by the agent on the other side, giving off steam and smokeMy husband Morris was a gentle man. But occasionally, if things didn’t go his way, he would get nasty. Once Alzheimer’s took his brain hostage, he exhibited a darker side. But only when he was frustrated or confused.

Morris spent the last two years of his life in a memory care home. He was popular among the staff because he liked to goof around. When he walked the halls listening to music on his Walkman, he’d have a smile on his face and swagger to the rhythm. But if another resident got in his way, watch out. If it was crowded in the dining room and someone accidentally bumped him, he’d swing his arm out to shoo that person away. When one of his neighbors walked into Morris’s room mistaking it for his own, the two got into a rumble on the bed and fought like school boys. After this happened a couple more times, the neighbor was moved to the opposite side of the facility.

When Morris hit a resident in the dining room, the on-call physician prescribed a depressant to “calm him down.” Morris reacted to the drug by transforming into a zombie who slumped in his chair and slept too many hours during the day. I insisted that he get off the drug and Morris returned to his mostly cheerful self.

I once had a next door neighbor whose wife had Alzheimer’s. She threatened to kill her husband with a knife and then went on to slash a painting hanging in their living room. Was she or Morris responsible for their actions? No. A person with dementia is not responsible for acts of violence because as the disease progresses, neurons in the cortex that are responsible for language, reasoning and social behavior are destroyed. This leads to some Alzheimer’s patients engaging in aggressive or violent behavior such as biting, kicking, spitting, slapping, punching, and/or using foul language.

Research from the National Institutes of Health indicates that up to 96 percent of patients with dementia who were studied over a 10-year-period exhibited aggressive behavior at one time or other. In 2011, CNN Health reported that 5 to 10 percent of Alzheimer’s patients exhibit violent behavior at some point during the course of the disease.

There is usually a reason for aggressive behavior.

What to watch out for

  • Urinary tract infection
  • Pain or stress
  • Loneliness, depression
  • Too much noise or stimulation
  • Boredom
  • Constipation
  • Soiled diaper or underwear
  • Uncomfortable room temperature
  • Physical discomfort (stomach ache, etc)
  • Confusion
  • Anger about loss of freedom (to drive, living independently)
  • Drug reaction or contra-indication
  • Resistance against being told what to do such as bathing
  • Sudden change in routine, environment or caregiver
  • Communication problems
  • Hunger or not liking the food
  • Dehydration

What to do

  1. If your life or the life of the person you care for is in danger, get help immediately!
  2. The Alzheimer’s Association has a 24-hour helpline at 800-272-3900.
  3. Rule out UTIs, pain, discomfort, etc.
  4. Use an essential oil to help calm the person down. When my husband got agitated I’d put a few drops of oil on a cotton pad inside a diffuser and plug it into the wall. He usually calmed down immediately.  The following oils can be used in a diffuser, or put in a bath or fragrance free moisturizer. They can also be sprayed on a pillow or handkerchief. Citrus oils are generally refreshing and uplifting for the mind and emotions, relieve stress and anxiety, and are useful for odor management and appetite support. Consider: bergamot, grapefruit, lemon, and orange. Floral oils are often used as a personal fragrance and are useful to relieve anxiety, depression, and irritability. These oils are useful as an inhaler, in a body lotion, and for the bath. Consider: clary sage, geranium, lavender, rose, and ylang ylang. Tree oils are revitalizing with immune boosting properties, ease respiratory congestion, and are supportive to breathing ease. They are useful for pain relief, skin infections, and odor management, and can relieve nervous exhaustion and depression. Consider: eucalyptus (Eucalytpus citriodora or globulus), pine needle, sandalwood, or Tea Tree.
  5. Reassure your patient by speaking gently and calmly.
  6. Play calming music, i.e. Mozart
  7. Try to distract the person with a TV show, favorite snack (ice cream almost always works), or a walk outside.
  8. Maintain a regular routine.
  9. Make sure the lighting is suitable in the home or facility.
  10. Help the person to maintain as much dignity and independence as possible.
  11. Make sure the person is eating a nutritious low-sugar, low-salt diet, with no or very limited amounts of alcohol and caffeine.

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

How dehydration can lead to delirium and other health issues

Different drinks in glass jugs on white background. Ideas for summer cocktailsIt’s hot outside and it’s easy to get dehydrated. Our body is 50-65% water. The brain, which is 70% water, gets dehydrated just like your body. When it is dehydrated, neurotransmission—which is heavily dependent on water—is impaired, resulting in poor memory, concentration and impaired abstract thinking.

Dehydration can also result in delirium. Delirium is a mental disturbance that is exhibited by a new or worsening confusion, changes in one’s consciousness or by hallucinations. It has a sudden onset from hours to days. It can be reversed but it’s easier to prevent delirium than to reverse it.

When my mom was admitted to the hospital for a UTI (urinary tract infection), she developed delirium. A psychiatrist called me to report that my mom was exhibiting full-blown dementia. I had just spoken to Mom a day before and she sounded fine. I refused the offer of an antipsychotic drug for her, knowing well the high risk of putting an older adult on those drugs. (see Why you should throw away that antipsychotic drug prescribed for your loved one). As it turned out, my mom was severely dehydrated. After a couple days on a hydrating intravenous solution she returned to her normal self.

It’s important to learn the signs of dehydration in everyone, but especially in seniors and young children. The physical symptoms are usually clear: dry lips and mouth, no tears when crying, decreased urine output, sunken eyes, headache, lethargy, dark urine and extreme thirst. The mental symptoms are not as obvious, but can result in mental confusion, irritability and delirium.

Many older adults often limit their fluid intake because they may be incontinent or fear accidents. Those who have limited mobility may try to avoid another trip to the toilet. Individuals who have aphasia (inability to speak due to dementia or brain damage from  stroke, etc.) may not be able to express their thirst.

If you are a caregiver, and that includes caring for yourself!) here are some helpful guidelines:

  • Encourage and remind your care partner to drink.
  • Drinking healthy fluids is important as eating healthy foods. Water is the top choice, followed by milk, vegetable and fruit juices. Remember that juices contain a lot of sugar, both natural and added, so don’t overdo them. Soups are nourishing and hydrating but be aware of the sodium content. Avoid carbonated and caffeinated drinks which have a diuretic effect.
  • Serve liquids at a temperature that your care partner likes. Not everyone enjoys ice water.
  • Flavor water with lime or lemon.
  • Remind your care partner not to wait until s/he is thirsty. By then s/he is already dehydrated.
  • Serve juicy fruits such as watermelon, which contain lots of water.
  • Offer healthy popsicles as an addition to drinks and to those who refuse water.

The rule of thumb is to have 48 to 64 ounces of non-sweetened, non-artificially sweetened drinks. Hydration keeps the body in proper pH (how acidic or alkaline your body is) and protects it from getting dehydrated, which is a cause of inflammation and other kinds of imbalances. Dehydration can also contribute to urinary tract infections (UTIs).

The dangers of UTIs

Urinary tract infections are notorious for causing delirium and delusional behavior in the elderly. When younger people get a urinary tract infection, they typically experience painful urination, an urgent need to urinate, lower abdominal pain, back pain on one side, and fever and chills. However, an older adult might not experience those symptoms. As we get older our immune system changes and it responds differently to infection. Instead of pain symptoms, seniors with a UTI may show increased signs of confusion, agitation or withdrawal. In older adults with dementia, these behavioral changes may come across as part of that condition or signs of advanced aging. If the underlying UTI goes unrecognized and untreated for too long, it can spread to the bloodstream and become life-threatening. In fact, I have a dear friend who died from a UTI that quickly became septic.

Always: Keep the patient hydrated since urination can flush out unwanted bacteria from the urinary tract.

The next time your mind is muddled, drink a tall glass of water and notice the difference. Drink plenty of water, fresh juices, and herbal teas to stay hydrated, flush out toxins and enjoy mental clarity—in summer and all year round.

 


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Keep your cool with these 10 summertime eating tips

Colorful smoothies in bottles, detox summer diet fresh drink for breakfast or snack.It’s summertime and the livin’ is easy—or at least we’d like it to be. This summer is especially hot all over the world. If you’re tired and stressed out from caregiving, these tips will help you stay cooler in summer. The same information applies to those we care for. . . and for everyone.

According to the ancient Indian system of Ayurveda our body consists of three main elements or doshas—Vatta, Pitta and Kapha. Pitta consists of water and fire. It’s hot, so during summer when the temperature rises we want to eat cooling foods. Eating cooling foods not only keeps us from overheating, it reduces the tendency to get irritable, impatient and angry.  (Chapters 20 and 31 in “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey through Alzheimer’s and Dementia” contain more information about ayurveda and nutrition that calms down the nervous system and supports immunity.)

  1. First and foremost, stay hydrated. It’s especially important to make sure you and your loved ones are getting enough liquids because when we forget to drink we can become dehydrated quickly, which leads to other health problems. It’s also crucial to keep the brain hydrated in order to maintain mental alertness. Drink plenty of water and stay away from carbonated and caffeinated drinks. Herbal teas, and fresh fruit or vegetable juices are great in summer. Just remember that fruit juices are high in sugar and calories. Coconut water is cooling and helps to replenish electrolytes, which is especially important during and after an illness.
  2. Enjoy the bounty of summer fruits. Peaches, apricots, cherries, watermelon, cantaloupe, and berries are especially good for helping the body reduce the fiery heat of summer. Juice them or make popsicles with watermelon juice or any other combination including yogurt. These are especially helpful to keep seniors hydrated and for people who have trouble chewing.
  3. According to Ayurveda, some of the recommended summer vegetables include cucumber, green leafy vegetables, green beans, squash, zucchini, asparagus, beets and eggplant. Juice a leafy green with cucumber and beets for a delicious cooling drink.
  4. Sprinkle on the herbs and spices. They’re easy to use and contribute added flavor and antioxidants to your diet. Cooling spices include cardamom, coriander, fennel and tumeric. Cooling herbs include cilantro, mint and dill.
  5. Avoid hot, sour and salty foods including fermented food, red meat, and greasy and spicy food. Excess pitta aggravates the tendency towards heartburn and gastric hyperacidity.
  6. Here’s some good news—Ayurveda recommends ice cream during the hot summer months! So by all means, enjoy! Dementia patients are especially fond of ice cream. If the person you are caring for refuses to eat or eats very little, try serving ice cream. It contains protein, calcium and calories, and it’s easy to serve and eat. If weight gain or cholesterol is a concern, select a dairy-free version of America’s favorite dessert. Rice Cream, Coconut Bliss and Soy Delicious make delicious non-dairy, frozen desserts.
  7. Cooling grains include amaranth, barley, quinoa, rice, tapioca and wheat. Use them in salads mixed with veggies. One of my favorites is quinoa salad. Cook 1 cup of quinoa. (Be sure to rinse it first to remove saponin, a naturally occurring chemical that coats each grain to ward off insects. It has a strong, bitter flavor. And yes, it is a pain to rinse quinoa. First soak it and then place it in a very fine mesh strainer and rinse.)  Sauté onion and zucchini, add a handful of fresh corn cut off the cob, mix with the quinoa. Add fresh tomatoes, black beans, and a dressing made with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Delicious!
  8. Make your own granola. Once you do, you’ll never go back to buying store-bought granola, which is typically filled with sugar. Plus, it is expensive. Oats, almonds, and coconut are all cooling. First toast 1/2 cup of slivered almonds on a cookie sheet in the oven. Watch carefully so they don’t burn. Add to 4 cups of oats, along with 1/2 cup coconut flakes, 1/4 cup coconut oil, 1/4 cup maple syrup. Add 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, if desired. (Cinnamon is warming, but a little bit won’t hurt.) Stir and bake at 325 degrees for about 20 minutes. Add raisins if desired.
  9. For added protein, top your salads with these cooling legumes: garbanzo, pinto, white beans, azuki beans, and black-eyed peas.
  10. If you eat meat try to avoid beef, chicken, and pork during the hot months and use cooling meats such as buffalo, turkey rabbit or venison instead.

Happy eating. . . and stay cool!


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.