Significant study points to MIND diet for improving brain health and preventing Alzheimer’s disease

Brain Nutrition

MIND diet includes salmon, beans, greens, nuts, berries

Have you heard of the MIND diet? It’s the Mediterranean diet and DASH diet slightly remade and combined to form the MIND diet. (MIND is an acronym that stands for the Mediterranean-DASH intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay.)

In a study published in September 2015 in Alzheimer’s & Dementia, the nutritional epidemiologist Martha Clare Morris and her colleagues at Rush University Medical Center borrowed concepts from the Mediterranean diet and the DASH diet. The result is the MIND diet.

The study followed 923 participantsages 58 to 98 years, for an average 4.5 years, and found the MIND diet lowered Alzheimer’s risk by about 35 percent for people who followed it moderately well and up to 53 percent for those who adhered to it rigorously. While more study is needed to better understand the long-term impact of the diet, Morris’s team’s second paper on the MIND diet notes that it’s superior to the DASH and Mediterranean diets for preventing cognitive decline. But it should be noted that high adherence to all three diets may reduce risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Food to eat on the MIND Diet

  • Green leafy vegetables: a minimum of 6 servings a week (kale, Swiss chard, spinach, collard, etc.)
  • Nuts: a minimum of 5 servings a week (walnuts, pistachios, almonds, cashews, etc)
  • Berries: a minimum of 2 servings a week
  • Beans: a minimum of 3 servings a week (garbanzo, red, black, kidney, white, pinto, etc.)
  • Whole grains: a minimum of 3 servings a day (millet, oats, brown rice, quinoa, wheat berries, etc.)
  • Fish: at least 1 serving a week
  • Poultry (like chicken or turkey): at least twice a week
  • Olive oil as the primary oil used
  • Wine: no more than 1 glass a day

Foods to limit or avoid

  • Red meat: no more than 4 servings a week
  • Butter and margarine: no more than 1 tablespoon (tbsp) daily
  • Cheese: no more than 1 serving a week
  • Sweets: no more than 5 servings a week
  • Fried or fast food: no more than 1 serving a week

To summarize the MIND DIET—

On a daily basis you eat at least three servings of whole grains, a salad and another vegetable, along with drinking a glass of wine. The jury is still out on whether a little alcohol consumption is better for the brain than none at all. I just heard a panel of researchers and neuroscientist address this issue. If you don’t consumer alcohol, there is certainly no reason for you to start now. But if you do, limit your consumption to one glass of wine a day.)

It’s advised that on most days you should snack on nuts, and every other day eat half a cup of beans. At least twice a week eat poultry and a half-cup serving of berries (blueberries are best), and eat fish at least weekly. Olive oil is the preferred cooking oil.

What is the DASH diet?

The healthy DASH diet plan was developed to lower blood pressure without medication in research sponsored by the US National Institutes of Health, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The first DASH diet research showed that it could lower blood pressure as well as the first line blood pressure medications, even with a sodium intake of 3300 mg/day!  Since then, numerous studies have shown that the DASH diet reduces the risk of many diseases, including some kinds of cancer, stroke, heart disease, heart failure, kidney stones, and diabetes. It has been proven to be an effective way to lose weight and become healthier at the same time.

The DASH diet eating plan is a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat or non-fat dairy. It also includes mostly whole grains; lean meats, fish and poultry; nuts and beans. It is high fiber and low to moderate in fat. It is a plan that follows US guidelines for sodium content, along with vitamins and minerals. In addition to lowering blood pressure, the DASH eating plan lowers cholesterol and makes it easy to lose weight. It is a healthy way of eating, designed to be flexible enough to meet the lifestyle and food preferences of most people.

How is it different from the Mediterranean diet? It can be considered to be an Americanized version of the Mediterranean diet, and to be easier to follow, since it has more specific guidelines. But if you love tabouli, hummus, and olives, you might prefer the Mediterranean diet.

Although there are similarities among all three diets, the MIND diet is the only one that encourages the consumption of foods that have been found to promote cognitive health.

There is a saying that “what’s good for your heart is good for your brain.” So please start switching over to the MIND diet while eliminating foods high in calories and low in nutrients. You will feel better and your brain will stay healthier longer.


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Caring for yourself and others with good nutrition

Mary Collette Rogers interviewed me on her podcast “The Healthy Kitchen Companion.”

Find out more about Mary’s programs around The New Kitchen Way: cookhappylivehealthy.org/blog/

Discover insights and tools for handling the challenges of caregiving, particularly stress. Sobering statistics highlight the need for addressing this topic: In 2017, fully 16 million friends and family provided 18 billion hours of unpaid care for 5½ million Americans with Alzheimer’s. That figure, of course, accounts for just one of many chronic conditions that required the services of caregivers.

Equally important is the need for self-care since it is said that at some point you’ll either be a caregiver or be cared for yourself. Self-care can minimize the need for care from others, or make it possible to provide care to those you love.

In this conversation, Barbra Cohn and Mary Collette Rogers share a wealth of knowledge and strategies for using the power of good nutrition to alleviate the stress of caregiving–whether for yourself or others.

Barbra, author of Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia, provides solid nutritional advice for
** Introducing the Stress Vitamins and minerals, and foods where they can be found
** How neurotransmitters like serotonin improve mood and how to use natural mood boosters in foods to uplift mood
** Why breakfast is the most important meal of the day for caregivers and key breakfast foods
** Barbra’s secret for boosting immunity, staying hydrated and replenishing nutrients drained by stress

Mary Collette, Healthy Kitchen Companion, explores how to ensure that Barbra’s nutritional wisdom doesn’t just get parked at the kitchen door. With The New Kitchen Way, her integrated approach to meal making, you’ll see good nutrition advice actually show up on your table–deliciously and easily. Learn
** About the power of organization and why it works as well in the kitchen as the business world
** How chaos and lack of control are the true culprits that sabotage kitchen fun and success
** How organization alleviates stress when you invite it into your kitchen and meal making
** How the kitchen and meal making can be broken down into just six areas, and
** How the 6 KitchenSmart Strategies easily guide you to get those six areas under control, leaving you relieved and confident about making nourishing meals.

 

 

6 surprising ways to increase your chances of living a healthy longer life

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Ponce de Leon claimed to have discovered the Fountain of Youth in Florida. I’ve been to Warm Mineral Springs, in North Port, Florida, which lays claim to de Leon’s discovery and calls itself the Fountain of Youth. Another natural spring in northwest Florida in Ponce de Leon springs State Park also calls itself the Fountain of Youth. I am a frequent visitor to hot springs (see my article on AAA’s Encompass website: ) and I feel refreshed and rejuvenated after soaking for several hours. But I need something stronger than a dose of calcium carbonate or sulphur to slow down the ticking of the clock, as far as my skin, muscles and cells are concerned.

I’ve asked myself and my guess is that you have also pondered the age-old question “would you want to live forever?”  The children’s book “Tuck Everlasting” by Natalie Babbitt explores the concept of immortality and explores whether living forever is as desirable as it may appear to be.

The typical response is only if I could stay healthy and vibrant. In our life time we will most likely not attain immortality, but there are a number of anti-aging tricks for slowing down the clock.

Age defying nutrients

  1. Study finds link between high EPA and DHA Omega-3 blood levels and decreased risk of death  Higher Omega-3 levels are linked to longer life. In a 15-year study of 6,500 elderly women, those with the highest blood concentration of omega-3 fatty acids were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause compared to those with the lowest levels. The researchers estimated that intakes of about 1 gram per day of EPA and DHA would be enough for a woman with the lowest blood serum concentration to shift to the group with the highest concentration. How? By taking one to three soft-gels of a high-quality omega-3 supplement daily or one teaspoon of a liquid supplement. Another option is to eat two or three salmon fillets each week.
  2. Study Finds Association Between Eating Hot Peppers And Decreased Mortality  If you like hot chile peppers eat more of them! After studying more than 16,000 adults, researchers at the University of Vermont found that those who ate chili peppers had a lower risk of dying from heart disease or stroke. The study did not indicate the quantity of peppers consumed, but capsaicin, the active ingredient that makes peppers “hot” aids in preventing obesity, supports blood flow, reduces inflammation and has antimicrobial properties.
  3. Beans, beans the musical fruit, the more you eat the more you toot. There’s another reason to eat beans. They contain phytates, nutritional compounds that strengthen the immune system and kill cancer cells. They also support brain health and are said to reverse the aging process at the cellular level. Beans are also high in fiber which helps lower cholesterol and regulate blood sugar.
  4. Two studies found that those with higher levels of vitamin D have longer telomeres, and thus may actually age more slowly than people with low vitamin D levels. Telomeres are the caps at the end of each strand of DNA that protect our chromosomes. A good analogy is that they are like the plastic tips at the end of shoelaces. Without the coating, shoelaces become frayed until they can no longer do their job.  Similarly, without telomeres DNA strands become damaged and then cells can’t do their job.  A study that included 4,347 participants in which 47% were men and 42% were women, researchers concluded that there is positive association between vitamin D levels and telomere length. This means that people with higher levels of vitamin D may actually age more slowly than people with lower levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D reduces the effects of chronic inflammation and may play a role in protecting your body from deteriorating from diseases associated with aging.The association of telomere length and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in US adults: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
  5. The traditional diet in Okinawa is anchored by root vegetables, especially sweet potatoes, green and yellow vegetables, soybean-based foods, and medicinal plants. Another feature of the Okinawan diet is the consumption of green tea. There have been more than 1000 studies done on the antioxidants found in green tea, demonstrating how they may be providing some level of chemoprevention in prostate and breast cancer. Green tea has also been shown to help reduce cardiovascular disease. Drink green tea for health and relaxation

    Many characteristics of the traditional Okinawan diet are shared with other healthy dietary patterns, including the traditional Mediterranean diet, DASH diet, and Portfolio diet. All these dietary patterns are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, among other age-associated diseases. Overall, the important shared features of these healthy dietary patterns include: high intake of unrefined carbohydrates, moderate protein intake with emphasis on vegetables/legumes, fish, and lean meats as sources, and a healthy fat profile (higher in mono/polyunsaturated fats, lower in saturated fat; rich in omega-3). The healthy fat intake is likely one mechanism for reducing inflammation, optimizing cholesterol, and other risk factors. Additionally, the lower caloric density of plant-rich diets results in lower caloric intake with concomitant high intake of phytonutrients and antioxidants. Other shared features include low glycemic load, less inflammation and oxidative stress, and potential modulation of aging-related biological pathways. This may reduce risk for chronic age-associated diseases and promote healthy aging and longevity.

    Social interaction is important

     

  6.  Dan Buettler, author of The Blue Zones of Happiness: Lessons From the World’s Happiest People, Oct 3, 2017 researched communities around the world to find out what centenarians had in common. These amazing people had one thing in common: strong social relationships. Being socially connected actually helps you to live longer! Studies are showing that loneliness might be a bigger health risk than smoking or obesity. In fact, loneliness and social isolation is considered not just a psychological issue but a medical one that can actually kill you. According to a far-reaching study (meta-analysis of scientific literature on the subject January 1980 to February 2014) conducted by Brigham Young University, social isolation and loneliness is as dangerous to health as smoking 15 cigarettes and drinking six ounces of alcohol a day, and increases one’s likelihood of death by 32%. Isolation and feeling alone has also been shown to contribute to depression, cognitive decline, the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, and poor recovery from illness and surgery.

If you are feeling a lonely or isolated, get ahead of the lonely curve now to expand your social network. Don’t put it off. Getting socially connected might take some effort, but it is definitely worth it for so many reasons. You will gain friendship, companionship, better health, and in the process you will be giving of yourself, which is the best gift of all.


“Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” by Barbra Cohn contains a treasure trove of information on how to stay connected with your loved one, keep calm, improve immunity, reduce stress and feel happier and healthier. Plus, it includes 20 healing modalities that the caregiver can do alone or with their loved one. Available wherever fine books are sold and on Amazon.


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