Do you have any of these risk factors for Alzheimers?

Woman with hypertension treating by a nurse

  1. Dizziness when standing up
  2. Reduced levels of plasmalogens
  3. High blood pressure
  4. Obesity
  5. Alcohol
  6. Head trauma
  7. Family history
  8. Smoking
  9. Age
  10. Social Isolation (see Loneliness vs. Aloneness: Why one is dangerous to your health

Most people know that old age is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, after age 65 the risk of Alzheimer’s doubles every five years. And after age 85 one out of three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or other form of dementia. You’ve probably also heard that obesity, alcohol consumption, head trauma, family history, smoking, and social isolation put you at increase risk.

But here are a few risk factors that you may not have heard about.

Dizziness when standing up

A new risk factor, and a concern for me personally, is orthostatic hypotension (OH), a fancy name for feeling  dizzy when you stand up. According to a new study, middle-aged people who experience orthostatic hypotension may have a higher risk of developing dementia later in life. The study analyzed data from 11,709 participants without a history of coronary heart disease or stroke. It concluded that individuals who experience a drop in systolic blood pressure (the bottom number) of at least 20 mm Hg or a drop in diastolic blood pressure (the top number) of at least 10 mm Hg on standing are said to have orthostatic hypotension.

Over a 25-year period, 1,068 participants developed dementia and 842 had an ischemic stroke. Compared to persons without OH at baseline, those with OH had a higher risk of dementia and ischemic stroke. Persons with OH had greater, although insignificant, cognitive decline over 20 years. But since the study doesn’t take any other risk factors into consideration, I’m not going to lose sleep over this.

2. We’ve heard how omega 3 fatty acids are necessary for a healthy cardiovascular system. But if your liver doesn’t process these key lipids properly it can spell trouble in your brain.

Reduced levels of plasmalogens — a class of lipids created in the liver that are integral to cell membranes in the brain — are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to new research presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2018 by Mitchel A. Kling, MD, an associate professor of Psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A reduced level is also implicated in Down’s Syndrome and Parkinson’s disease.

In 2012, scientists found a 40% reduction in plasmalogen content of white matter in the brain in individuals with early stage Alzheimer’s.

Plasmalogens are created in the liver and are dispersed through the blood stream in the form of lipoproteins, which also transport cholesterol and other lipids to and from cells and tissues throughout the body, including the brain. The researchers measured several plasmalogens including those containing omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), as well as an omega-6 fatty acid and closely-related non-plasmalogen lipids, in blood-based fluids collected from two groups. The first group included 1,547 subjects that have Alzheimer’s disease, MCI or significant memory concerns (SMC), and subjects who were cognitively normal (CN) and who are enrolled in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The second group included 112 subjects from the Penn Memory Center, including those with Alzheimer’s, MCI, and CN.

“Our findings provide renewed hope for the creation of new treatment and prevention approaches for Alzheimer’s disease,” Kling said. “Moving forward, we’re examining the connections between plasmalogens, other lipids, and cognition, in addition to gene expression in the liver and the brain. While we’re in the early stages of discovering how the liver, lipids, and diet are related to Alzheimer’s disease and neurodegeneration, it’s been promising.”



You would think that taking omega 3s would help, right? Well, according to the study, they don’t. However, plasmalogens from mussels are being sold in Japan and Singapore as a health supplement for Alzheimer’s disease. See Scallop-derived PLASMALOGEN. There is also a Singapore product for sale in the U.S. that supposedly helps your body increase the level of plasmalogens. It’s called NeuroREGAIN. You can read about it here: NeuroREGAIN

According to the first study cited, these products don’t help because of the pH in the
digestive system and the ability to utilize the ingredients.
But it’s up to you. I tried lots of things with my husband, and if he were still alive I’d probably try this product, too.


3. Recently, researchers from the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL, set up a study funded by the National Institutes of Health to look for links between blood pressure and physical markers of brain health in older adults. The findings are published in the July 11, 2018, online issue of Neurology. Study co-author Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis explains the types of pathology they were searching for.

“We researched whether blood pressure in later life was associated with signs of brain aging that include plaques and tangles linked to Alzheimer’s disease, and brain lesions called infarcts, areas of dead tissue caused by a blockage of the blood supply, which can increase with age, often go undetected and can lead to stroke, said Arvanitakis.”

Healthy blood pressure is less than 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mmHg). The higher number is called systolic blood pressure, the pressure in the blood vessels when the heart beats. The lower number is called diastolic blood pressure, the pressure when the heart is at rest.

For the study, 1,288 older people were followed until they died, which was an average of eight years later. The average age at death was 89 years. Blood pressure was documented yearly for each participant and autopsies were conducted on their brains after death. The average systolic blood pressure for those enrolled in the study was 134 mmHg and the average diastolic blood pressure was 71 mmHg. Two-thirds of the participants had a history of high blood pressure, and 87 percent were taking high blood pressure medication. A total of 48 percent of the participants had one or more brain infarct lesions.

Researchers found that the risk of brain lesions was higher in people with higher average systolic blood pressure across the years. For a person with one standard deviation above the average systolic blood pressure, for example 147 mmHg versus 134 mmHg, there was a 46 percent increased risk of having one or more brain lesions, specifically infarcts. For comparison, the effect of an increase by one standard deviation on the risk of having one or more brain infarcts was the equivalent of nine years of brain aging.

Those with one standard deviation above the average systolic blood pressure also had a 46 percent greater chance of having large lesions and a 36 percent greater risk of very small lesions. Arvanitakis noted that an important additional result of the study was that people with a declining systolic blood pressure also had an increased risk of one or more brain lesions, so it was not just the level but also the declining blood pressure which was associated with brain lesions.

Separately, higher average diastolic blood pressure was also related to brain infarct lesions. People who had an increase of one standard deviation from an average diastolic blood pressure, for example from 71 mmHg to 79 mmHg, had a 28 percent greater risk of one or more brain lesions.

The results did not change when researchers controlled for other factors that could affect the risk of brain lesions, such as whether they used high blood pressure drugs.

When looking for signs of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain at autopsy, researchers found a link between higher average late-life systolic blood pressure across the years before death and a higher number of tangles, but not plaques. Arvanitakis said this link is difficult to interpret and will need more research.

 The bottom line is be aware of your blood pressure and how to maintain healthy levels.

Natural remedies to support healthy blood pressure and circulation:

  • Magnesium
  • Potassium
  • Vitamin B complex
  • Vitamin C
  • CoQ10
  • Resveratrol
  • Astaxanthin
  • Nattokinase
  • Pomegranate
  • Acetyl-L-carnitine

A healthy heart supports a healthy brain. Here are 12 ways to support both.

12 ways to support a healthy heart

  1. Eat a nutritious, high-fiber, low-fat heart healthy diet.
  2. Include foods high in phytonutrients (the nutrients found in plants)
  3. Get plenty of foods containing omega-3 fatty acids (found in cold water fish). Vegetarians should take flax-seed oil or ground flax seed.
  4. Take nutritional supplements proven to support a healthy heart
  5. Practice a stress reduction technique such as yoga or meditation
  6. Exercise
  7. Stop smoking!
  8. Reduce and/or avoid alcohol
  9. Get an annual physical exam to rule out other health factor risks
  10. Protect yourself from environmental toxins
  11. Drink 6 to 8 glasses of purified, filtered water every day
  12. Get plenty of restful sleep!

 

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Helpin order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Men: Are you taking care of yourself?

仲の良い父と娘Happy Father’s Day to all men who play a caring role in the life of a child, and kudos for  all that you do. But let me ask you this: Do you take care of yourself? Typically, most men take better care of their cars than themselves. Most men wait until a symptom pops up, and by then the illness or disease has progressed.

I’m not going to give you a lecture about how you should make an appointment tomorrow to get a routine preventative check-up, but hopefully after going through the following list, you’ll see my point.

Take this quiz to see how much you really know about men’s health. 

1) As a man gets older, it’s almost inevitable that he:

  1. loses interest in sex
  2. has a difficult time maintaining an erection
  3. doesn’t need to exercise as much
  4. develops an enlarged prostate

2) To detect prostate cancer early, a man should:

  1. have a colonoscopy
  2. practice a monthly self prostate examination
  3. have a digital rectal exam and PSA blood test
  4. have a sonogram of his prostate every year

3) Impotence can result from:

  1. drinking too much alcohol
  2. recreational drug use (smoking marijuana)
  3. high blood pressure
  4. diabetes
  5. all of the above

4) 75% of prostate cancer occurs in:

  1. Hispanic men
  2. men over 65
  3. men who eat a low-fat diet
  4. men with low testosterone levels

5) The most common cancer among men is:

  1. prostate cancer
  2. lung cancer
  3. skin cancer
  4. colon cancer

6) Which racial/ethnic group is most likely to develop prostate cancer?

  1. Caucasian
  2. Asian
  3. Hispanic
  4. African-American

7) A common risk factor for developing prostate cancer is:

  1. lack of exercise
  2. high fat diet
  3. high testosterone levels
  4. growing older
  5. all of the above

8) What beverage has been found to support prostate health?

  1. beer
  2. green tea
  3. orange juice
  4. red wine

9) What common food has been found to support prostate health?

  1. oranges
  2. tomatoes
  3. beef
  4. cheese

10) Which disease is considered the number one cause of death among American males?

  1. diabetes
  2. prostate cancer
  3. obesity
  4. cardiovascular disease

11) Cardiovascular disease kills far more men and women than cancer.

  1. True
  2. False

12) Eating a diet that includes plenty of pasta, potatoes and white rice can reduce your risk of heart disease.

  1. True
  2. False

13) The heart muscle is totally responsible for maintaining normal blood pressure levels.

  1. True
  2. False

14) Cardiovascular disease is hereditary and cannot be prevented.

  1. True
  2. False

15) CVD starts in the teenage years.

  1. True
  2. False

16) An aspirin a day is the best way to thin the blood, in order to reduce the chance of stroke and heart attack.

  1. True
  2. False

17) High blood cholesterol is the best overall indicator of cardiovascular disease.

  1. True
  2. False

18) Statistics show that the stress of caregiving can result in chronic disease for the caregiver and take as many as ten years off one’s life.


Answers:

1) d

2) g

3) e- all of the above. Not smoking, eating a healthy diet, not overdoing it when it comes to drinking, regular exercise, getting enough sleep, will all help support normal blood flow. Also, Ginkgo biloba extract helps support normal blood flow to the penis

4) b. Simply growing older increases a man’s risk. Seventy-five percent of prostate cancer occurs in men over 65 with only 7% diagnosed in men under 60 years of age.

5) c. Skin cancer is the number one form of cancer in the US. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men next to skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men after lung cancer.

6) d. African-American males have the highest incidence of prostate cancer, a third higher than white males, and African-American males are also twice as likely to die from it.

7) e. Also, men who have higher testosterone levels, or who eat a high fat diet have been shown to have an increased risk of developing prostate cancer.

8) b. Green tea is chock full of antioxidants that have been shown to reduce cancer. Red wine, on the other hand, is a natural preventative against cardiovascular disease.

9) b. Tomatoes contain lycopene, especially potent in the fight against prostate cancer.

10) d. Among major disease groups, heart disease is the leading cause of death within the elderly population.

11) True. Although cancer fears are more common, cardiovascular disease is the chief cause of death and disability in the United States today. It affects close to 60 million Americans and every year more than a million people suffer from new or recurrent heart attacks. In fact,every 20 seconds a person in the United States has a heart attack, and one-third of these attacks leads to death. The American Heart Association calls CVD “the silent epidemic.”

12) False. For years we were told that a heart-healthy diet included foods low in fat and high in carbohydrates, such as fruits, veggies, legumes, grains and other starches. But now experts are saying that overloading on carbohydrates (especially the wrong kind) can make you fat and increase your risk of heart disease. Eating foods with a high glycemic index—such as cookies, cake, candy, bagels, pasta, white rice, refined bread and grains, potatoes and potato chips—raises blood sugar and insulin levels, which in turn stimulates the production of triglycerides (blood fats that raise heart disease risk).

13) False. Your kidneys, blood vessels and heart all control blood pressure. In order to maintain healthy blood pressure and keep blood moving, the walls of your arteries, capillaries and veins need to be flexible and strong. Research has shown that nutrients such as Co-Q10, hawthorne, red wine polyphenols, notoginseng (a cousin of ginseng), and astragalus help strengthen blood flow throughout the entire body, maintaining healthy blood pressure. In addition, EDTA (the main ingredient in Health Freedom Nutrition’s Cardio Clear) removes heavy metals and toxins that interfere with the production of nitric oxide, a major factor in controlling blood pressure.

14) False. Even if there’s heart disease in your family, and even if you have high cholesterol, combining an regular exercise program with and a Mediterranean based diet and healthy lifestyle (no smoking, reduced alcohol consumption) can dramatically reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke.

15) True. Dr. Scoot Calig, M.D., a pediatrician at West Hills Medical Center and an assistant clinical professor at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, says, “It’s important to keep in mind that the development of cardiovascular disease begins in the teenage years. Studies have shown that by that time, arterial plaque formation is well under way.”  Just another reason to exercise, eat a healthy diet, and take nutritional supplements such as oral EDTA to strengthen the heart and arteries and clear out toxic metals that inhibit the production of nitric oxide.

16) False. For years, aspirin has been prescribed after a heart attack, in order to avoid a subsequent heart attack. And now, a panel of experts is recommending aspirin as a precaution against heart disease for all at-risk, healthy adults over 40. But Alfred Berg, M.D., of the University of Washington, head of the panel says, “Do not assume that an aspirin a day is without risk.” Aspirin can cause intestinal bleeding and hemorrhagic stroke. Herbs such as hawthorne, nattokinase, garlic and Ginkgo biloba have the ability to thin the blood like aspirin, without damaging the esophageal and intestinal linings, or exacerbating ulcers.

17) False. Homocysteine—a by-product of the amino acid methionine— is a more sensitive indicator of cardiovascular health than cholesterol. Too much of it increases injury to arterial walls, as well as accelerates oxidation and accumulation of cholesterol in blood vessel. The good news is that folic acid, and vitamins B6 and B12 help keep homocysteine levels low!

18) True—for men and women! Click here to read 16 Stress-busters to nourish your body, mind and soul

Have a happy Father’s Day, and please take care of your health so you can continue to enjoy life and be a support and friend to everyone who loves you.


For dozens of general health tips and caregiving help read Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s and Dementia  by Barbra Cohn.image

10 signs you need help with stress

Businessman sinking in heap of documentsStress is a part of life, and it can be a motivator or it can be a deadly menace. If you are stressed about an exam or need to be at church on time to get married, it can be a good thing. But if you’re a caregiver and have been stressed for years, it can be terrible for your health.

First described by Walter Cannon in the 1920s, the fight-or-flight response, also called the acute stress response, kicks in when we are presented with danger or an emergency. Our brains react quickly to keep us safe by preparing the body for action. Hunters who were responsible for killing game to provide food for their tribe and the animals being hunted experienced the fight-or-flight response on a regular basis. Today, because of the stressful world we live in, the fight-or- flight response is more commonly triggered by psychological threats than physical ones, such as an argument with a spouse, demanding bosses, out-of-control drivers, road rage, etc.

In the physiological response to stress, pupils dilate to sharpen vision, and heart rate and blood pressure increase to accelerate the delivery of oxygen to fuel muscles and critical organs. Blood flow is diverted from non-critical areas, such as the gastrointestinal tract, to the critical areas, such as the heart, skeletal muscles, and liver.

The liver releases glucose and fatty acids into the bloodstream. Glucose is for immediate energy; fat is needed when the fight-or-flight response lasts longer than expected. Bronchial tubes dilate to maximize the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

When the body is in a constant state of “emergency alert” due to chronic stress such as caregiving, the adrenal glands—the small walnut shaped glands that sit on top of your kidneys—get “stuck” in the on position. When this happens, the whole system goes into chronic fight-or-flight. Glucose that is dumped into your blood stream goes unused, so your body has to produce an enormous amount of insulin to handle it. Eventually, this can result in hypoglycemia or diabetes. Fat that is dumped into your blood also goes unused, so it clogs your arteries, leading to cardiovascular disease. If you drink three or more cups of coffee every day, the stress hormone cortisol becomes elevated, which can set you up for countless health problems, including poor quality of sleep, impaired immunity, and age-related deterioration.

The key is to be alert to stress triggers, recognize that you are stressed, and discover ways that help keep you on an even keel.

If you experience any of the following symptoms, it’s time for you to take charge of your stress before you succumb to a serious illness or disease.

  1. Fatigue and sluggishness
  2. Difficulty falling asleep and or staying asleep
  3. Chronic colds or other health issues
  4. Depression
  5. Suicidal thoughts
  6. Dependence on drugs, both recreational and pharmaceutical
  7. Too much alcohol and/or tobacco consumption
  8. Irritability, anger and/or anxiety
  9. Weight control issues including abdominal fat or weight loss
  10. Heart palpitations
  11. High blood pressure
  12. Mental fog or forgetfulness
  13. Headaches or back pain
  14. Jaw and/or tooth pain could indicate that you are clenching your jaw at night
  15. Unexplained hair loss
  16. Stomach pain or chronic diarrhea
  17. Twitching in a facial muscle
  18. Holding your breath, or taking sudden deep breaths because you have forgotten to breathe
  19. Painful adrenal band across the kidney region
  20. Skin irritations

If you want to learn more about stress and how you can prevent it, deal with it and conquer it, read 12 quick energy and stress fixes to use throughout the holiday season. . . and all year long.

For a resource guide containing 20 modalities for feeling less stressed, happier and healthier read: Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s and Dementia.   Available on Amazon and at all bookstores that sell quality books.

BarbraCohn__

 

16 Stress-busters to nourish your body, mind and soul

Girl can't sleep

Susan, a recent divorcee, is the 48-year-old mother of two college students. She works full-time as a legal secretary and after work she helps her mother, who is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. On weekends Susan catches up on her errands and shops for her mom.  During the week she falls into bed exhausted at 9 p.m. . . . if her mom doesn’t require extra help. But Susan can’t sleep. She’s too worried about everything she has to do, and she is worried about her mom. Susan develops an ulcer and is diagnosed with hypertension. Unfortunately, Susan is a composite of the more than 16 million caregivers in the United States who spend 18 billion hours of unpaid time each year caring for a loved one with dementia.

Every day, one million Americans are absent from work because of stress-related disorders. Experts agree that stress is a factor in most diseases, and a major factor in disorders such as anxiety, insomnia, depression, ulcers, rheumatoid arthritis, headache, hypoglycemia, asthma, herpes, hypertension and heart disease.

Yet, stress is a fact of life. Even a positive experience like a new job, marriage or house can be a stress-provoking event—because stress is defined as a reaction to any stimulus that upsets our normal functioning. The bad news is we all have to face stress. The good news is, it’s easier than ever to neutralize stress before it takes its toll. The key is to maintain a balance, both mentally and physically, so stress doesn’t upset your equilibrium.

The Chemistry of Stress

First, let’s look at what happens to your body as a result of stress.

Once upon a time, stress was episodic. For instance, if a tiger approached you, your body released stress hormones to help you fight or flee. By the time the encounter was over, the entire stress response had been fully utilized and the body returned to normal.

The Fight-or-Flight Response looks something like this:

  • Pupils dilate to sharpen vision.
  • Heart rate and blood pressure increase to accelerate the delivery of oxygen to fuel the muscles and critical organs.
  • Blood flow is diverted from non-critical areas such as the gastrointestinal tract to the critical areas such as the heart, skeletal muscles and liver.
  • Liver releases glucose and fatty acids into the bloodstream. Glucose is for immediate energy; fat is needed when the fight-or-flight response lasts longer than expected.
  • Bronchial tubes dilate to maximize the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

Today, however, you may be sitting at a desk or driving your car when the stress mechanism is triggered. The modern response is not to fight or flee, but to gnash your teeth, grip the steering wheel, scream, yell or “stuff it.” Our bodies are in a constant state of “emergency alert,’ and the results can be devastating:

  • Blood pressure rises. Depending on how many stressful situations you encounter, it may stay elevated, damaging the sensitive tubules of your kidneys. Ultimately, kidney function is compromised, which raises your blood pressure even more, which contributes to further kidney damage, which raises blood pressure…
  • Glucose that is dumped into your bloodstream goes unused, so your body has to produce an enormous amount of insulin to handle it. Eventually, this may result in hypoglycemia or diabetes.
  • Fat that is dumped into your blood also goes unused, so it clogs your arteries, leading to cardiovascular disease.
  • If you drink caffeine, the stress hormone cortisol becomes elevated, which can set you up for countless health problems including: poor quality of sleep, impaired immunity and age-related deterioration.
  • The adrenal glands produce or contribute to the production of about 150 hormones—all vital to your health. When they are stressed, they become exhausted. Once the adrenal buffer is gone, you become a prime candidate for asthma, allergy, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and other autoimmune disorders.

Devise a Plan that Works for You

So, how do your live in the 21st century and not let stress affect your health?

First of all, you need a plan to help you deal with tough issues, so you can think more clearly and act from a calm, centered position. That plan should include a good diet, and excellent nutritional support with nutrients that enhance relaxation. Establish a daily routine that includes plenty of quality sleep, exercise and a stress-reducing or relaxation technique. Just keep in mind that even though it’s impossible not to have some stress in your life, you can strengthen and nourish yourself on a daily basis, so that you’re better prepared to deal with the next challenge life has to offer.

16 Stress-busters to nourish your body, mind and soul

Daytime

1) Get proper nutritional support to help stop free radical damage, and eat a balanced diet.

2) Exercise! It lowers stress hormones and gives you more energy. Choose an activity that you enjoy and is appropriate for your age and condition. And do it regularly!

3) Learn a relaxation technique such as meditation or yoga. Research has shown they both lower blood pressure, relieve anxiety, enhance overall health, accelerate weight loss, improve sleep and increase blood levels of DHEA. It also restores your sense of clarity and purpose.

4) Laughter is real medicine. It’s a tension tamer and your body produces endorphins (“feel good”chemicals) when you laugh. Rent a funny movie or play charades.

5) Learn to “let go.” Next time you’re in a traffic jam, instead of getting worked up about something you have no control over, use the time to visualize something you want to happen … or listen to a new book-on-tape.

6) Avoid stimulants such as tobacco, caffeine, sugar or coping-solutions that involve alcohol or drugs. Using a chemical means of reducing your stress leads to addiction and increases your problems.

7) Get outside! A little sunlight every day will enhance your body’s natural rhythms and provide you with vitamin D.

8) Take regular breaks at work. Get up and stretch, roll your neck and make sure you drink at least 8-10 glasses of water a day.

 

Nighttime

9) Wind down earlier in the evening. It’s difficult to fall asleep after working late or watching a suspenseful movie. Relax instead with an inspirational book, soft music and a cup of herbal tea or warm milk.

10) A warm bath helps increase circulation to the skin and relax the muscles. Add a few drops of pine needle essence, oil of eucalyptus, mustard powder or lavender oil for a soothing effect.

11) Take five minutes at the end of each day to prepare for the next. Don’t make long lists. Rather, prioritize. It will help you feel more in control.

12) Go to bed earlier. Research shows that the hours of sleep before 2 a.m. are more rejuvenating than the hours after 2 a.m. Sleeping from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. will do you more good than sleeping from midnight to 7 a.m.

13) Don’t eat right before bed. Your digestive system won’t get the break it needs, and you won’t feel completely rested in the morning.

14) Cut back on caffeine. If you do consume caffeine, be moderate and try not to consume any after 2pm.

16) Put a sachet filled with lavender flowers under your pillow for sweet dreams.