10 of the best nutrients for men that you may not know about

Man eating salad

Calling all men, and the people who love them. June is Men’s Health Month, and a perfect time of year to evaluate your diet. There are no more excuses for being a couch potato. It’s time to get up, go outdoors, have fun, and get some exercise!

It’s also a great time to boost your nutrition with antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables, and learn some easy ways to cook them on the grill. Here’s a list of some of the important nutrients to add to your health regimen for a boost in overall health, energy, uplifted mood, brain support, and, yes, your sex life.

  1. Lycopene offers the best antioxidant protection of the 600 naturally occurring carotenoids. Carotenoids are the pigments found in colorful fruits such as watermelon, guavas, and tomatoes.  Thousands of articles have been published discussing lycopene’s potential as a protectant against prostate, lung, breast, skin, and pancreatic cancer. There is even a new study indicating that because of the strength of its antioxidant ability, lycopene has the potential to be developed as a clinical nutrient supplement for the prevention of AD –Alzheimer’s disease. The best way to get the benefits of lycopene is by eating tomatoes cooked in olive oil or tomato sauce.
  2. Did you know that if you are a man living in the United States it’s almost inevitable you’ll eventually have to face prostate problems? The prostate gland begins to grow in most males after they reach 40 years of age because DHT (dihydrotestosterone), a potent form of the male hormone testosterone, increases in the body. Testosterone is produced by the testicles and the adrenal glands and DHT accumulates in the prostate, causing prostate cells to rapidly divide. This overgrowth of prostate tissue compresses the urethra and slows or even stops the flow of urine in a similar way that a bent garden hose inhibits the flow of water. This occurs in 75 percent of men over 60 and sometimes the enlargement is the result of something more serious. Numerous studies have found that saw palmetto contains fatty acids and sterols effective in balancing male hormones, supporting testicular functions, and relieving prostate discomfort. Saw Palmetto helps reduce the level of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by blocking its receptor sites in the prostate, and by inhibiting enzymes necessary for DHT conversion. It also helps shrink over-grown prostate tissue without bothersome side effects.
  3. B6, B12, and folic acid are important for reducing homocysteine levels, which is considered a major culprit in heart disease. Medical professionals are learning that homocysteine—a by-product of the amino acid methionine—is often a better indicator of your cardiovascular health than cholesterol. High levels of homocysteine indicate inflammation within the arteries, which can increase injury to the arterial wall. Consequently, this causes plaque to form, inhibiting blood flow, which increases risk of a blood clot from forming. Scientists and physicians have observed that most people with a high homocysteine level don’t get enough folic acid, vitamin B6 or B12 in their diet. In fact, in 1969 Dr. Kilmer S. McCully of Harvard Medical School discovered that patients with heart disease had nearly 80% less vitamin B6 in their blood serum than healthy individuals. Supplementing with these vitamins helps return the homocysteine level to normal. B6 also helps support healthy blood pressure.
  4. Resveratrol is a super antioxidant found in red grapes and wine. It has also been shown to reduce the inflammation and damage in the blood vessels that results from homocysteine. Hundreds of studies have shown that it supports cardiovascular health and may even provide anti-aging benefits.
  5. CoQ10 (Coenzyme Q10) is a co-enzyme that is called the “spark plug” of your cells. It is essential for electron transport within the mitochondria, and the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is responsible for energizing the 70-100 trillion cells in your body. The highest concentration of this important antioxidant resides in the heart. Without it your heart wouldn’t be able to beat 100,000 times a day, and some experts believe that if deficiency levels reach 75% your heart would stop beating. As we get older our levels of CoQ10 naturally start to decline. Our body needs vitamins, trace minerals and the amino acid tyrosine in order to produce CoQ10. If you are deficient in any of those nutrients because your diet is inadequate then your body will not be able to adequately produce CoQ10.Also, statins (cholesterol-lowering drugs) block CoQ10 production by blocking cholesterol synthesis, which is necessary for the production of CoQ10. So if you take Lipator or another statin drug it is crucial that you take a CoQ10 supplement. An 8-week study of 59 men already taking medications for high blood pressure found that 120 mg daily of CoQ10 reduced blood pressure by about 9% when compared to placebo.  Recent studies have shown that CoQ10 supplementation can save the lives of patients with congestive heart failure, and that 91% of heart attack victims improve within 30 days of adding CoQ10 to their list of daily supplements.  CoQ10 supplementation has also been found to support numerous cardiovascular illnesses, including atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and hypertension.
  6. Siberian ginseng is an adaptogen or substance that normalizes and balances all of the body’s systems, increasing your ability to handle physical and mental stress. It also helps support the adrenal glands, which help regulate energy levels.
  7. Multi-vitamin mineral supplements for men are formulated to address the unique nutritional needs of today’s man and to insure your  health. Look for one that is iron-free, since iron can negatively affect heart health.
  8. L-Arginine is an amino acid that is involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO), a chemical released by the blood that helps the muscles in the penis to relax. This, in turn, allows healthy blood flow in order to sustain a healthy erection. Without arginine in the diet, there would be no NO, and without NO men would not be able to have erections. And without erections there would be no . . . . Get the picture? But beyond sex, L-arginine helps build muscle mass, enhance immune function, improve blood pressure, increase memory, and speed wound healing. Arginine-derived nitric oxide has also been found to play a supporting role in the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems and has been validated by hundreds of studies. Foods that include arginine include meat, legumes, nuts and seeds, and turkey breast, chicken, and pork.
  9. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential acids, meaning your body does not manufacture them. You must obtain them through diet or nutritional supplementation. They are vital to supporting cardiovascular health, including blood flow to your heart and brain, and numerous other body functions. EPA and DHA, the long-chain omega-3s support healthy function of the brain and retina. DHA is a building block of tissue in the brain and retina in the eye. It is important in the production of phosphatidylserine, a neurotransmitter vital to brain cell communication. Studies show that omega-3s are also important to supporting an uplifted, even mood, and that a deficiency can lead to depression. It is also beneficial to creaky joints. Omega-3 fatty acids are the healthy fats that you can’t live without. To make sure you are getting adequate amounts, eat cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel, cod, herring, sardines, at least twice a week. It is also found in freshly ground flaxseed or flaxseed oil; dark, leafy greens, hemp seed, soybeans, canola, walnut and flaxseed and oils made from those beans, nuts and seeds. To play it safe, my advice is to take an omega-3 fatty acid supplement.
  10. Chromium Picolinate is a first class blood sugar and insulin regulator. Nine out of 10 American diets fall short of this trace mineral, which is essential for the transfer of sugar from the bloodstream to muscle cells, thereby giving them the fuel they need to work.  Chromium is involved in maintaining cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and it is also necessary for our muscles to function properly. Chromium is believed to help build new muscle and act as a fat burner. When combined with an exercise program, chromium supplementation has been shown to produce significant weight loss.  Research suggests that chromium may help those with diabetes II and hypoglycemia. In a recent study, participants with a binge-eating disorder who took chromium picolinate supplementation, had improved glucose regulation.

Happy Father’s Day to everyone who is involved in the life of a child.

You are appreciated!


 

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

 

Do you have any of these risk factors for Alzheimers?

Woman with hypertension treating by a nurse

  1. Dizziness when standing up
  2. Reduced levels of plasmalogens
  3. High blood pressure
  4. Obesity
  5. Alcohol
  6. Head trauma
  7. Family history
  8. Smoking
  9. Age
  10. Social Isolation (see Loneliness vs. Aloneness: Why one is dangerous to your health

Most people know that old age is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, after age 65 the risk of Alzheimer’s doubles every five years. And after age 85 one out of three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or other form of dementia. You’ve probably also heard that obesity, alcohol consumption, head trauma, family history, smoking, and social isolation put you at increase risk.

But here are a few risk factors that you may not have heard about.

Dizziness when standing up

A new risk factor, and a concern for me personally, is orthostatic hypotension (OH), a fancy name for feeling  dizzy when you stand up. According to a new study, middle-aged people who experience orthostatic hypotension may have a higher risk of developing dementia later in life. The study analyzed data from 11,709 participants without a history of coronary heart disease or stroke. It concluded that individuals who experience a drop in systolic blood pressure (the bottom number) of at least 20 mm Hg or a drop in diastolic blood pressure (the top number) of at least 10 mm Hg on standing are said to have orthostatic hypotension.

Over a 25-year period, 1,068 participants developed dementia and 842 had an ischemic stroke. Compared to persons without OH at baseline, those with OH had a higher risk of dementia and ischemic stroke. Persons with OH had greater, although insignificant, cognitive decline over 20 years. But since the study doesn’t take any other risk factors into consideration, I’m not going to lose sleep over this.

2. We’ve heard how omega 3 fatty acids are necessary for a healthy cardiovascular system. But if your liver doesn’t process these key lipids properly it can spell trouble in your brain.

Reduced levels of plasmalogens — a class of lipids created in the liver that are integral to cell membranes in the brain — are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to new research presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2018 by Mitchel A. Kling, MD, an associate professor of Psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A reduced level is also implicated in Down’s Syndrome and Parkinson’s disease.

In 2012, scientists found a 40% reduction in plasmalogen content of white matter in the brain in individuals with early stage Alzheimer’s.

Plasmalogens are created in the liver and are dispersed through the blood stream in the form of lipoproteins, which also transport cholesterol and other lipids to and from cells and tissues throughout the body, including the brain. The researchers measured several plasmalogens including those containing omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), as well as an omega-6 fatty acid and closely-related non-plasmalogen lipids, in blood-based fluids collected from two groups. The first group included 1,547 subjects that have Alzheimer’s disease, MCI or significant memory concerns (SMC), and subjects who were cognitively normal (CN) and who are enrolled in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The second group included 112 subjects from the Penn Memory Center, including those with Alzheimer’s, MCI, and CN.

“Our findings provide renewed hope for the creation of new treatment and prevention approaches for Alzheimer’s disease,” Kling said. “Moving forward, we’re examining the connections between plasmalogens, other lipids, and cognition, in addition to gene expression in the liver and the brain. While we’re in the early stages of discovering how the liver, lipids, and diet are related to Alzheimer’s disease and neurodegeneration, it’s been promising.”



You would think that taking omega 3s would help, right? Well, according to the study, they don’t. However, plasmalogens from mussels are being sold in Japan and Singapore as a health supplement for Alzheimer’s disease. See Scallop-derived PLASMALOGEN. There is also a Singapore product for sale in the U.S. that supposedly helps your body increase the level of plasmalogens. It’s called NeuroREGAIN. You can read about it here: NeuroREGAIN

According to the first study cited, these products don’t help because of the pH in the
digestive system and the ability to utilize the ingredients.
But it’s up to you. I tried lots of things with my husband, and if he were still alive I’d probably try this product, too.


3. Recently, researchers from the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL, set up a study funded by the National Institutes of Health to look for links between blood pressure and physical markers of brain health in older adults. The findings are published in the July 11, 2018, online issue of Neurology. Study co-author Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis explains the types of pathology they were searching for.

“We researched whether blood pressure in later life was associated with signs of brain aging that include plaques and tangles linked to Alzheimer’s disease, and brain lesions called infarcts, areas of dead tissue caused by a blockage of the blood supply, which can increase with age, often go undetected and can lead to stroke, said Arvanitakis.”

Healthy blood pressure is less than 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mmHg). The higher number is called systolic blood pressure, the pressure in the blood vessels when the heart beats. The lower number is called diastolic blood pressure, the pressure when the heart is at rest.

For the study, 1,288 older people were followed until they died, which was an average of eight years later. The average age at death was 89 years. Blood pressure was documented yearly for each participant and autopsies were conducted on their brains after death. The average systolic blood pressure for those enrolled in the study was 134 mmHg and the average diastolic blood pressure was 71 mmHg. Two-thirds of the participants had a history of high blood pressure, and 87 percent were taking high blood pressure medication. A total of 48 percent of the participants had one or more brain infarct lesions.

Researchers found that the risk of brain lesions was higher in people with higher average systolic blood pressure across the years. For a person with one standard deviation above the average systolic blood pressure, for example 147 mmHg versus 134 mmHg, there was a 46 percent increased risk of having one or more brain lesions, specifically infarcts. For comparison, the effect of an increase by one standard deviation on the risk of having one or more brain infarcts was the equivalent of nine years of brain aging.

Those with one standard deviation above the average systolic blood pressure also had a 46 percent greater chance of having large lesions and a 36 percent greater risk of very small lesions. Arvanitakis noted that an important additional result of the study was that people with a declining systolic blood pressure also had an increased risk of one or more brain lesions, so it was not just the level but also the declining blood pressure which was associated with brain lesions.

Separately, higher average diastolic blood pressure was also related to brain infarct lesions. People who had an increase of one standard deviation from an average diastolic blood pressure, for example from 71 mmHg to 79 mmHg, had a 28 percent greater risk of one or more brain lesions.

The results did not change when researchers controlled for other factors that could affect the risk of brain lesions, such as whether they used high blood pressure drugs.

When looking for signs of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain at autopsy, researchers found a link between higher average late-life systolic blood pressure across the years before death and a higher number of tangles, but not plaques. Arvanitakis said this link is difficult to interpret and will need more research.

 The bottom line is be aware of your blood pressure and how to maintain healthy levels.

Natural remedies to support healthy blood pressure and circulation:

  • Magnesium
  • Potassium
  • Vitamin B complex
  • Vitamin C
  • CoQ10
  • Resveratrol
  • Astaxanthin
  • Nattokinase
  • Pomegranate
  • Acetyl-L-carnitine

A healthy heart supports a healthy brain. Here are 12 ways to support both.

12 ways to support a healthy heart

  1. Eat a nutritious, high-fiber, low-fat heart healthy diet.
  2. Include foods high in phytonutrients (the nutrients found in plants)
  3. Get plenty of foods containing omega-3 fatty acids (found in cold water fish). Vegetarians should take flax-seed oil or ground flax seed.
  4. Take nutritional supplements proven to support a healthy heart
  5. Practice a stress reduction technique such as yoga or meditation
  6. Exercise
  7. Stop smoking!
  8. Reduce and/or avoid alcohol
  9. Get an annual physical exam to rule out other health factor risks
  10. Protect yourself from environmental toxins
  11. Drink 6 to 8 glasses of purified, filtered water every day
  12. Get plenty of restful sleep!

 

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Helpin order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.