10 of the best nutrients for men that you may not know about

Man eating salad

Calling all men, and the people who love them. June is Men’s Health Month, and a perfect time of year to evaluate your diet. There are no more excuses for being a couch potato. It’s time to get up, go outdoors, have fun, and get some exercise!

It’s also a great time to boost your nutrition with antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables, and learn some easy ways to cook them on the grill. Here’s a list of some of the important nutrients to add to your health regimen for a boost in overall health, energy, uplifted mood, brain support, and, yes, your sex life.

  1. Lycopene offers the best antioxidant protection of the 600 naturally occurring carotenoids. Carotenoids are the pigments found in colorful fruits such as watermelon, guavas, and tomatoes.  Thousands of articles have been published discussing lycopene’s potential as a protectant against prostate, lung, breast, skin, and pancreatic cancer. There is even a new study indicating that because of the strength of its antioxidant ability, lycopene has the potential to be developed as a clinical nutrient supplement for the prevention of AD –Alzheimer’s disease. The best way to get the benefits of lycopene is by eating tomatoes cooked in olive oil or tomato sauce.
  2. Did you know that if you are a man living in the United States it’s almost inevitable you’ll eventually have to face prostate problems? The prostate gland begins to grow in most males after they reach 40 years of age because DHT (dihydrotestosterone), a potent form of the male hormone testosterone, increases in the body. Testosterone is produced by the testicles and the adrenal glands and DHT accumulates in the prostate, causing prostate cells to rapidly divide. This overgrowth of prostate tissue compresses the urethra and slows or even stops the flow of urine in a similar way that a bent garden hose inhibits the flow of water. This occurs in 75 percent of men over 60 and sometimes the enlargement is the result of something more serious. Numerous studies have found that saw palmetto contains fatty acids and sterols effective in balancing male hormones, supporting testicular functions, and relieving prostate discomfort. Saw Palmetto helps reduce the level of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by blocking its receptor sites in the prostate, and by inhibiting enzymes necessary for DHT conversion. It also helps shrink over-grown prostate tissue without bothersome side effects.
  3. B6, B12, and folic acid are important for reducing homocysteine levels, which is considered a major culprit in heart disease. Medical professionals are learning that homocysteine—a by-product of the amino acid methionine—is often a better indicator of your cardiovascular health than cholesterol. High levels of homocysteine indicate inflammation within the arteries, which can increase injury to the arterial wall. Consequently, this causes plaque to form, inhibiting blood flow, which increases risk of a blood clot from forming. Scientists and physicians have observed that most people with a high homocysteine level don’t get enough folic acid, vitamin B6 or B12 in their diet. In fact, in 1969 Dr. Kilmer S. McCully of Harvard Medical School discovered that patients with heart disease had nearly 80% less vitamin B6 in their blood serum than healthy individuals. Supplementing with these vitamins helps return the homocysteine level to normal. B6 also helps support healthy blood pressure.
  4. Resveratrol is a super antioxidant found in red grapes and wine. It has also been shown to reduce the inflammation and damage in the blood vessels that results from homocysteine. Hundreds of studies have shown that it supports cardiovascular health and may even provide anti-aging benefits.
  5. CoQ10 (Coenzyme Q10) is a co-enzyme that is called the “spark plug” of your cells. It is essential for electron transport within the mitochondria, and the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is responsible for energizing the 70-100 trillion cells in your body. The highest concentration of this important antioxidant resides in the heart. Without it your heart wouldn’t be able to beat 100,000 times a day, and some experts believe that if deficiency levels reach 75% your heart would stop beating. As we get older our levels of CoQ10 naturally start to decline. Our body needs vitamins, trace minerals and the amino acid tyrosine in order to produce CoQ10. If you are deficient in any of those nutrients because your diet is inadequate then your body will not be able to adequately produce CoQ10.Also, statins (cholesterol-lowering drugs) block CoQ10 production by blocking cholesterol synthesis, which is necessary for the production of CoQ10. So if you take Lipator or another statin drug it is crucial that you take a CoQ10 supplement. An 8-week study of 59 men already taking medications for high blood pressure found that 120 mg daily of CoQ10 reduced blood pressure by about 9% when compared to placebo.  Recent studies have shown that CoQ10 supplementation can save the lives of patients with congestive heart failure, and that 91% of heart attack victims improve within 30 days of adding CoQ10 to their list of daily supplements.  CoQ10 supplementation has also been found to support numerous cardiovascular illnesses, including atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and hypertension.
  6. Siberian ginseng is an adaptogen or substance that normalizes and balances all of the body’s systems, increasing your ability to handle physical and mental stress. It also helps support the adrenal glands, which help regulate energy levels.
  7. Multi-vitamin mineral supplements for men are formulated to address the unique nutritional needs of today’s man and to insure your  health. Look for one that is iron-free, since iron can negatively affect heart health.
  8. L-Arginine is an amino acid that is involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO), a chemical released by the blood that helps the muscles in the penis to relax. This, in turn, allows healthy blood flow in order to sustain a healthy erection. Without arginine in the diet, there would be no NO, and without NO men would not be able to have erections. And without erections there would be no . . . . Get the picture? But beyond sex, L-arginine helps build muscle mass, enhance immune function, improve blood pressure, increase memory, and speed wound healing. Arginine-derived nitric oxide has also been found to play a supporting role in the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems and has been validated by hundreds of studies. Foods that include arginine include meat, legumes, nuts and seeds, and turkey breast, chicken, and pork.
  9. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential acids, meaning your body does not manufacture them. You must obtain them through diet or nutritional supplementation. They are vital to supporting cardiovascular health, including blood flow to your heart and brain, and numerous other body functions. EPA and DHA, the long-chain omega-3s support healthy function of the brain and retina. DHA is a building block of tissue in the brain and retina in the eye. It is important in the production of phosphatidylserine, a neurotransmitter vital to brain cell communication. Studies show that omega-3s are also important to supporting an uplifted, even mood, and that a deficiency can lead to depression. It is also beneficial to creaky joints. Omega-3 fatty acids are the healthy fats that you can’t live without. To make sure you are getting adequate amounts, eat cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel, cod, herring, sardines, at least twice a week. It is also found in freshly ground flaxseed or flaxseed oil; dark, leafy greens, hemp seed, soybeans, canola, walnut and flaxseed and oils made from those beans, nuts and seeds. To play it safe, my advice is to take an omega-3 fatty acid supplement.
  10. Chromium Picolinate is a first class blood sugar and insulin regulator. Nine out of 10 American diets fall short of this trace mineral, which is essential for the transfer of sugar from the bloodstream to muscle cells, thereby giving them the fuel they need to work.  Chromium is involved in maintaining cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and it is also necessary for our muscles to function properly. Chromium is believed to help build new muscle and act as a fat burner. When combined with an exercise program, chromium supplementation has been shown to produce significant weight loss.  Research suggests that chromium may help those with diabetes II and hypoglycemia. In a recent study, participants with a binge-eating disorder who took chromium picolinate supplementation, had improved glucose regulation.

Happy Father’s Day to everyone who is involved in the life of a child.

You are appreciated!


 

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

 

Mouth-watering recipes in celebration of International Mediterranean Diet Month!

свежая рыба с овощами на деревянном столе

The Mediterranean diet emphasizes eating a plant-based diet including: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts; replacing butter with healthy fats such as olive oil and avocado oil; using herbs and spices instead of salt; limiting red meat to no more than a few times a month, and eating fish such as salmon, halibut, sardines, and tuna at least twice a week. It is considered one of the healthiest diets in the world.

I hope you enjoy some of the following recipes. Please share your favorite Mediterranean recipe. I’d love to try it!

Enjoy!

Pour on the olive oil

Olives and avocados, and other foods rich in monounsaturated fatty acids, have a positive effect on blood glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride and insulin levels.

Olive oil is great on everything. It has been shown to help increase HDL “good” cholesterol while it lowers LDL “bad” cholesterol. Further, olive oil helps reduce cardiovascular risk and provides vitamin E, an important antioxidant.

Tomatoes are a rich source of beta-carotene and the powerful antioxidant lycopene, which has been shown to help reduce the risk of prostate cancer in numerous studies.

A 1995 Italian study researched the effects of nutrient-derived antioxidants on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation.  The study found that olive oil constituents effectively inhibit (LDL) oxidation, suggesting that the intake of such antioxidants plays a role in the lower incidence of coronary heart disease in the Mediterranean countries, where olive oil and other high-antioxidant foods are a major part of the diet.Creole Fish

One of my favorite summertime meals is Nicoise salad. Grill a salmon fillet (I like to have leftovers), and add it to a bed of salad greens. Add whatever veggies taste good to you and/or in your fridge: Cook them first: beets, green beans, potatoes, etc. Top with dressing, toasted pumpkin seeds, feta cheese, etc. The possibilities are endless.

 

Halibut or salmon 

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces of halibut or salmon fillet
  • 1 15-ounce can no-salt, organic stewed tomatoes, or 2 cups chopped fresh tomatoes
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • ½ cup chopped green pepper
  • 2 Tbs fresh basil
  • 1 tsp. fresh thyme
  • 2 Tbs fresh parsley
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 Tbs olive oil

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350
  2. Put washed fish fillet inside a baking dish that has been greased with olive oil.
  3. Sauté onion, green pepper and tomatoes in 2 Tbs. olive oil.
  4. Blend veggies with the herbs and place on top of the fish.
  5. Bake covered for 10-15 minutes, or until the fish is cooked.
  6. Season with lemon juice, and salt and pepper if desired.

Avocado  Enjoy a few slices of avocado in your tossed salad, or mix some chopped avocado into your favorite salsa.

Curried Lentils -serves 4. (from whfoods.com)

 Ingredients

  • 1 cup brown or green lentils, washed
  • 4 cups + 1 Tbs vegetable broth
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 medium cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, diced into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 2 medium celery stalks, diced into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 2 cups finely chopped kale
  • 2 tsp curry powder
  • 1 15 oz can diced tomatoes (do not drain)
  • 3 Tbs chopped fresh cilantro
  • salt and black pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Rinse lentils in strainer and sort through, removing debris.
  2. Chop onions and garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out their hidden health benefits.
  3. Heat 1 Tbs broth in medium soup pot.
  4. Sauté onion in broth over medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until translucent.
  5. Add garlic, carrots, and celery.
  6. Continue to sauté for another couple of minutes.
  7. Add curry powder and mix to bring out its flavor.
  8. Add rinsed and drained lentils, 4 cups broth and tomatoes.
  9. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium low, and simmer uncovered until lentils and vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes.
  10. Add kale and simmer for another 10 minutes.

Spinach salad with orange and walnuts —serves 4.

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces spinach, washed, trimmed and dried (1 bunch)
  • 2 navel oranges
  • 1/3 cup walnuts, coarsely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce

Dressing

  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon poppy seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Directions

  1. Mix soy sauce and walnuts and roast for 15 minutes at 350°F or until golden.
  2. Peel oranges and slice crosswise in 1/4 inch slices, and then cut in fourths.
  3. Mix spinach greens, torn into smaller pieces, oranges and walnuts.
  4. Mix salad dressing in the blender. Toss dressing and spinach mixture together and serve.

Watermelon salad with feta and mint (serves 8-10)

Ingredients

  •  1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp Balsamic vinegar
  • One-8 pound seedless watermelon, scooped into balls or cut into chunks
  • ½ pound feta cheese, crumbled (2 cups)
  • 1 small sweet onion, cut into ½ inch pieces
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped mint leaves

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, whisk the oil, lemon juice, salt, Tabasco and pepper.
  2. Add the watermelon, feta, olives and onion and toss gently with the watermelon.
  3. Garnish with the mint and serve.

Avocado and Bean Burrito—serves 2

(from The Ultra-Metabolism Cookbook by Mark Hyman, M.D.Great for a delicious, quick lunch.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups shredded romaine lettuce
  • 2 Tbs. yellow onion, chopped
  • ½ medium avocado, peeled, pitted and chopped
  • 2 Tbs. chopped cilantro
  • 4 Tbs. chunky tomato salsa
  • ½ cup nonfat refried beans
  • 2 corn tortillas

Directions

  1. Mix the lettuce, onion, avocado, cilantro and salsa in a medium bowl until the vegetables are evenly coated.
  2. Smear half of the beans on each tortilla, fill with veggie mixture, and wrap burrito style.

Italian pesto—Use on broiled chicken, fish, pasta or bread

Ingredients

  • 1 large bunch basil, finely chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese (optional)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil

Directions

  1. Place basil, garlic, pine nuts and Parmesan cheese in a blender or food processor.
  2. Blend until thoroughly chopped and mixed.
  3. Continue processing while gradually adding olive and flax oils.
  4. Blend until smooth. Use within two days. Makes about 1 cup.

Three-Bean Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cooked kidney beans
  • 1 cup cooked garbanzos
  • 1 cup cooked, cooled green beans
  • ¾ cup lemon and oil dressing (recipe follows)
  • ¼ cup chopped celery
  • ½ cup chopped green pepper
  • ½ cup chopped red pepper
  • 1 Tbs. chopped parsley or cilantro

Directions

  1. Toss all the ingredients together.
  2. Marinate in the refrigerator, stirring occasionally to coat the beans. Makes 3 cups.

Lemon and oil dressing (basic dressing and marinade)

  • 2 Tbs lemon juice
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ¼ to ½ tsp salt
  • fresh pepper

Mix the ingredients together. Makes 1/3 cup.

Hummus

Hummus (pronounced hum´-es) is a dip/spread that is made from chickpeas, which are considered one of the oldest foods, dating back to ancient Egypt, Greece and Italy.Today, hummus is one of the most popular foods to emerge from the Mediterranean and Middle East region.

In addition to pureed chickpeas, hummus is an exotic blend of sesame tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, and spices including garlic, the most important. You can experiment and add others such as roasted red peppers, scallion and dill. Hummus is traditionally served with pita bread, crackers or fresh cut veggies. It can also be used as a spread on sandwiches. Hummus contains no saturated fat or cholesterol and is high in protein and fiber.

Ingredients:

  • 1 16 oz can of organic chickpeas or garbanzo beans
  • 1/4-cup liquid from can of chickpeas
  • juice of one or two lemons – to taste
  • 1/4 cup—1/2-cup tahini
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/4—1/2-teaspoon salt – to taste
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons parsley or chives
  • paprika—gives it color and doesn’t take away from taste

Directions

  1. Drain chickpeas and set aside liquid from can.
  2. Rinse the beans and combine with rest of ingredients in blender or food processor.
  3. Add 1/4 cup of liquid from chickpeas.
  4. Blend for 3-5 minutes on low until thoroughly mixed and smooth.
  5. Place in serving bowl or dish, and create a shallow well in the center of the hummus.
  6. Add a small amount (1-2 tablespoons) of olive oil in the well. Garnish with parsley and paprika.
  7. Serve with pita bread, crackers, and/or carrot and celery sticks, red peppers, or whatever you like.

Ricotta, feta and spinach spread (4 servings)

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ricotta cheese
  • ¼ pound feta
  • 1 cup spinach (frozen is ok)
  • ¼ cup walnuts, chopped
  • 1 Tbs. olive oil
  • ½ cup onion, sautéed in olive oil
  • 1 Tbs. rosemary
  • ¼ tsp. black pepper.

Directions

Blend together and eat with raw veggies or healthy crackers

Healthy snacks

  • Hummus and/or Baba Ganoosh with celery and carrot sticks, Bell pepper slices, or any other veggies that appeal to you.
  • Turkey slices wrapped around raw veggies (Buy roasted turkey slices, available at most deli counters, as opposed to turkey preserved with nitrates.)
  • Avocados contain healthy fats. Eat ¼ to ½ an avocado by scooping out with a spoon, or mash it up, add your favorite herbs/spices, and use as a dip for veggies or healthy chips.
  • Sliced apple with almond butter, peanut butter, or tahini
  • Hard boiled eggs or deviled eggs
  • Small handful of nuts—almonds, cashews, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, with an apple
  • Whole milk yoghurt and fruit
  • Bean tacos or tortillas, stuffed with tomatoes, greens, avocado, shredded carrots, Bell pepper, salsa
  • Chicken drumsticks
  • A scoop of tuna salad topped with sunflower seeds, chopped tomato, celery, fresh basil
  • ½ cup of whole milk cottage cheese with berries, or fruit of your choice, or ½ chopped raw veggies
  • Bake a sweet potato or yam the night before. Cut in half and top with 1 Tbs. cashews, almonds or pumpkin seeds, ¼ cup whole milk yoghurt or coconut milk yoghurt, cinnamon

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What happens to your body when you’re a stressed caregiver?

Woman having a headacheStatistics show the stress of care giving can result in chronic disease for the caregiver and take as many as 10 years off one’s life. In comparison to caregivers of people in all categories, caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients in particular rate their health more poorly, take worse care of themselves, and spend more money on their health care. Feeling more tired and depleted, they evaluate themselves as less healthy, engage in fewer health-promoting behaviors, and use more health services.

Given the demands on caregivers’ time and energy, they may neglect their own self-care by sleeping less, eating too much or too little, not exercising, or not managing their own health problems. Neglect of their own health may worsen pre-existing illnesses or increase vulnerabilities to new stress-related problems.

The Physiology of Stress

Walter Cannon described the fight or flight response in 1929.  Adrenaline is the fight-or-flight hormone: It causes cells, especially muscle cells, to speed up energy production so that the body will be ready to fight a foe or run away. It is needed for short blasts of stress.

  • Pupils dilate to sharpen vision.
  • Heart rate and blood pressure increase to accelerate the delivery of oxygen to fuel the muscles and critical organs.
  • Blood flow is diverted from non-critical areas such as the gastrointestinal tract to the critical areas such as the heart, skeletal muscles and liver.
  • Liver releases glucose and fatty acids into the bloodstream. Glucose is for immediate energy; fat is needed when the fight-or-flight response lasts longer than expected.
  • Bronchial tubes dilate to maximize the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

Cortisol bolsters us in long-lasting stress situations. But when the body is dealing with chronic stress, the adrenals get “stuck” in the on position and the whole system goes into chronic “fight or flight.”

  • Glucose that is dumped into your bloodstream goes unused, so your body has to produce an enormous amount of insulin to handle it. Eventually, this may result in hypoglycemia or diabetes.
  • Fat that is dumped into your blood also goes unused, so it clogs your arteries, leading to cardiovascular disease.
  • If you drink caffeine, the stress hormone cortisol becomes elevated, which can set you up for countless health problems including: poor quality of sleep, impaired immunity and age-related deterioration.

Adrenal exhaustion–The adrenal glands produce or contribute to the production of about 150 hormones. When they are stressed, they become exhausted. Once the adrenal buffer is gone, you become a prime candidate for asthma, allergy, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, autoimmune disorders, hypoglycemia

Alcohol, caffeine, sugar and salt put added stress on the adrenals.

Stimulate, such as caffeine increase the effects of your body’s own stimulating neurotransmitters: norepinephrine and dopamine, which are similar to adrenaline in their effects. Caffeine and these natural stimulants provide short-term energy, focus and even a lifted mood. But in the long-term, caffeine depletes your stores of norepinephrine and dopamine, leaving you more tired, sluggish and down than you were before the caffeine habit.

Psychological stress can impact cardiovascular function and lead to cardiovascular disease, and possible stroke/heart attack.

Stress and sleep

Adequate sleep repairs your body, sharpens your mind and stabilizes emotions. Lack of sleep triggers the body to increase production of cortisol, which makes it harder to fall asleep and stay in a deep sleep because on some level your body and brain think they need to stay alert for danger.

  • Loss of sleep as a result of caring for a loved one can lead to serious depression.
  • As little as five nights of poor sleep can significantly stress the heart.

Weight gain and insulin resistance

  • Increased cortisol production leads to weight gain. The adrenals increase gluconeogenesis, which provides the body with glucose from protein, rather than carbohydrates. This decreases serotonin and melatonin, which results in poor sleep and leads to food cravings for carbohydrate-rich foods in order to uplift mood, which releases more serotonin and insulin. This leads to more stress and insulin production to regulate glucose, which may lead to fat storage, weight gain and insulin resistance. It becomes a vicious cycle.
  • Insufficient sleep is also associated with lower levels of leptin, a hormone that alerts the brain that it has enough food, as well as higher levels of ghrelin, a biochemical that stimulates appetite. Consequently, poor sleep may result in food cravings.

Exercise

  1. Insufficient sleep may leave us too tired to burn off extra calories with exercise.
  2. When your body is stressed and prepared to fight or run it’s full of stress hormones. If you’re sedentary, those hormones will continue to circulate and cause damage to your body. Vigorous exercise, however, burns off those hormones. Exercise also releases the neurotransmitter serotonin and endorphins, the body’s natural pain relievers.
  3. Doctors from Nottingham Trent University suggest the chemical phenylethylamine is released during exercise and could play a part in uplifting mood as a result of exercise. Phenylethylamine is a naturally produced chemical that has been linked to the regulation of physical energy, mood and attention.

Impact of food on mood and physiology

Hazards of caffeine

  1. Caffeine stresses the adrenal glands and can contribute to anxiety, insomnia, depression, irritability, anxiousness—not good for caregivers. In fact, studies show that those who drink the most coffee often suffer from chronic depression. It depletes the body of B1, biotin, inositol, vitamin C, calcium, potassium, and zinc. It increases thirst because it is dehydrating, over stimulates and weakens the kidneys, pancreas, liver, stomach, intestines, heart, and nervous system.
  2. Can increase production of cortisol, leading to stronger cravings for fat and carbohydrates. This increases blood glucose, release of insulin and fat stored in the abdomen.
  3. Increases dopamine levels, making you feel good until it wears off
  4. May interfere with restful sleep
  5. Try not to drink coffee after 2pm
  6. Simple carbohydrates increase insulin production.

People who are stressed often crave and overeat sugar and simple carbohydrates, like chips, cookies and white bread or pasta, because those foods provide a fast release of the feel-good chemical serotonin. But eating this way causes a blood-sugar crash a couple of hours later, leaving you tired and moody. The more of these foods that you eat the more you crave. Although these foods are high in calories, they contribute few nutrients and deplete the body of essential vitamins and minerals, raise triglycerides, and contribute to inflammation and excess weight.

  1. Lack of water/fiber can rob the body of nutrients because of problems with digestion and assimilation
  • HFCS and other artificial sweeteners can interfere with your natural production of neurotransmitters. Aspartame (NutraSweet and Equal) competes with tryptophan by blocking its conversion into serotonin. Artificial sweeteners contribute to numerous adverse symptoms, as compiled by the Food and Drug Administration and include everything from menstrual changes, weight gain, and headaches to severe depression, insomnia and anxiety attacks.

High fructose corn syrup (glucose and fructose) can lead to a decrease in leptin production leading your body into thinking it’s hungry so you eat more, especially processed foods. HFCS can lead to insulin resistance and higher levels of triglycerides, as well as obesity, hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

Bad habits, i.e. forgetting to eat, eating on the run, not eating breakfast all contribute to unstable blood sugar and adrenal exhaustion, which makes you grab foods that aren’t good for you, so you end up feeling irritable, moody, and even more stressed.


You get the picture? It’s important to take care of yourself, especially when you are taking care of someone else. I don’t want to overwhelm you with information or preach to you. Here’s a short checklist to help you stay healthy and balanced.

  • Eat a serving of high-quality protein with every meal and snack
  • Focus on complex carbohydrates (whole grains, veggies and fruits), and eliminate junk foods (refined carbs).
  • Enjoy unlimited amounts of fresh veggies.
  • Eat a good breakfast!
  • Eat 3 balanced meals and 1-2 snacks/day.
  • Magnesium, B complex, fish-oil, walnuts, flax seeds, dark leafy greens, and high quality all help reduce stress and uplift mood.
  • Meditate or find some quiet time for yourself
  • Exercise! At least take a short walk everyday.
  • Put on a funny YouTube video and laugh.
  • Use aromatherapy.
  • Do the best you can.

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Does gum disease really cause Alzheimer’s disease?

Doctor holding blue crystal ball with gum disease sign on medical background.A study published January 23, 2019 in Science Advances caused a lot of people to freak out. It implied that the bacteria called Prophyromonas gingivalis that cause gum disease—gingivitis– might be the culprit in Alzheimer’s disease. It sounded too good to be true. But can you reduce your risk by getting regular dental check-ups, and brushing and flossing every day?

I posted a link to the study on my Facebook page and got some heated responses such as “I don’t believe that. My mom and husband always went to the dentist??????” Another person called the study “BS.” 

So, what is the bottom line? And what is the response of scientists who were not involved in the research paid for and conducted in part by employees of Cortexyme, Inc., a San Francisco–based biotech company? 

Here’s the gist of the Cortexyme study: the researchers found that enzymes made by P. gingivalis, called gingipains, interact with amyloid-beta and tau (the proteins implicated in Alzheimer’s disease) in test tube experiments and in the brains of mice. According to the study, gingipains cause A-beta to accumulate and tau to behave abnormally. These are the primary signposts of Alzheimer’s disease in the brains of humans.  The Cortexyme group also found genetic material from P. gingivalis in the cerebral cortex – an area involved in conceptual thinking – in the three Alzheimer’s brains they examined. Cortexyme, Inc. is developing compounds that block gingipains, which their scientists claim reduce the amount of A-beta in the infected mice.

In a previous study, Sim Singhrao at the University of Central Lancashire, UK, found that P. gingivalis can migrate from the mouth to the brain in mice with gum infections. Her group of researchers concluded that periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

A cautious response

Rudolph Tanzi,PhD, an Alzheimer’s researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston says that the Science Advances study is inconclusive.  An interview in Science News (January 31, 2019) conducted by Laura Sanders reported Tanzi’s responses to the following questions:

Do we now know what causes Alzheimer’s disease?

No. “It would be a complete fantasy to say that now we’ve solved Alzheimer’s based on this,” Tanzi says.  “People need to know that this was a small study…. It’s way too early to say that this result is valid.  We need to see many more samples. We need much more replication.”

Headlines that claim gum bacteria causes Alzheimer’s disease stretch the science way too far, he says. “It got out of hand. People should not be freaking out just because they didn’t floss enough. It doesn’t mean you’re going to get Alzheimer’s.”

But did it make sense to look at whether gum bacteria play a role in Alzheimer’s?

Yes. Tanzi and his colleagues suspect that Alzheimer’s is kicked off by brain inflammation, perhaps prodded along by bacteria, viruses or fungi. His team has been looking at large swaths of genetic material found in brains to figure out exactly which infectious entities might be in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s.

“We went in expecting to see periodontal bacteria in the brain. That was a leading hypothesis. One of the biggest pools of bacteria in your body lives in your gums if your gums are not clean. We expected to find them, but we didn’t.” (Those negative results, from dozens of brains, are unpublished.)

What you need to know

Periodontitis is the most common infectious inflammatory disease of humans. A recent survey in the USA concluded that 47.2% of adults aged 30 years and older had periodontitis. The disease is characterized by the loss of periodontal ligament, connective tissue, and alveolar bone, and is a major cause of tooth loss. 

Now we know that virulent strains of P. gingivalis can affect the central nervous system, which can result in Alzheimer’s and dementia. Although the research is still in its early stages, it’s a good idea to amp up your dental care and get thee to a dentist at least once a year for an exam and cleaning. It is certainly worth the bucks if it will help reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Don’t you think?

For more information about periodontal disease and why it’s important to floss please take a look at my previously published blog Do you still need to floss


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Significant study points to MIND diet for improving brain health and preventing Alzheimer’s disease

Brain Nutrition

MIND diet includes salmon, beans, greens, nuts, berries

 

Have you heard of the MIND diet? It’s the Mediterranean diet and DASH diet slightly remade and combined to form the MIND diet. (MIND is an acronym that stands for the Mediterranean-DASH intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay.)

In a study published in September 2015 in Alzheimer’s & Dementia, the nutritional epidemiologist Martha Clare Morris and her colleagues at Rush University Medical Center borrowed concepts from the Mediterranean diet and the DASH diet. The result is the MIND diet.

The study followed 923 participantsages 58 to 98 years, for an average 4.5 years, and found the MIND diet lowered Alzheimer’s risk by about 35 percent for people who followed it moderately well and up to 53 percent for those who adhered to it rigorously. While more study is needed to better understand the long-term impact of the diet, Morris’s team’s second paper on the MIND diet notes that it’s superior to the DASH and Mediterranean diets for preventing cognitive decline. But it should be noted that high adherence to all three diets may reduce risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Food to eat on the MIND Diet

  • Green leafy vegetables: a minimum of 6 servings a week (kale, Swiss chard, spinach, collard, etc.)
  • Nuts: a minimum of 5 servings a week (walnuts, pistachios, almonds, cashews, etc)
  • Berries: a minimum of 2 servings a week
  • Beans: a minimum of 3 servings a week (garbanzo, red, black, kidney, white, pinto, etc.)
  • Whole grains: a minimum of 3 servings a day (millet, oats, brown rice, quinoa, wheat berries, etc.)
  • Fish: at least 1 serving a week
  • Poultry (like chicken or turkey): at least twice a week
  • Olive oil as the primary oil used
  • Wine: no more than 1 glass a day

Foods to limit or avoid

  • Red meat: no more than 4 servings a week
  • Butter and margarine: no more than 1 tablespoon (tbsp) daily
  • Cheese: no more than 1 serving a week
  • Sweets: no more than 5 servings a week
  • Fried or fast food: no more than 1 serving a week

To summarize the MIND DIET—

On a daily basis you eat at least three servings of whole grains, a salad and another vegetable, along with drinking a glass of wine. The jury is still out on whether a little alcohol consumption is better for the brain than none at all. I just heard a panel of researchers and neuroscientist address this issue. If you don’t consumer alcohol, there is certainly no reason for you to start now. But if you do, limit your consumption to one glass of wine a day.)

It’s advised that on most days you should snack on nuts, and every other day eat half a cup of beans. At least twice a week eat poultry and a half-cup serving of berries (blueberries are best), and eat fish at least weekly. Olive oil is the preferred cooking oil.

What is the DASH diet?

The healthy DASH diet plan was developed to lower blood pressure without medication in research sponsored by the US National Institutes of Health, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The first DASH diet research showed that it could lower blood pressure as well as the first line blood pressure medications, even with a sodium intake of 3300 mg/day!  Since then, numerous studies have shown that the DASH diet reduces the risk of many diseases, including some kinds of cancer, stroke, heart disease, heart failure, kidney stones, and diabetes. It has been proven to be an effective way to lose weight and become healthier at the same time.

The DASH diet eating plan is a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat or non-fat dairy. It also includes mostly whole grains; lean meats, fish and poultry; nuts and beans. It is high fiber and low to moderate in fat. It is a plan that follows US guidelines for sodium content, along with vitamins and minerals. In addition to lowering blood pressure, the DASH eating plan lowers cholesterol and makes it easy to lose weight. It is a healthy way of eating, designed to be flexible enough to meet the lifestyle and food preferences of most people.

How is it different from the Mediterranean diet? It can be considered to be an Americanized version of the Mediterranean diet, and to be easier to follow, since it has more specific guidelines. But if you love tabouli, hummus, and olives, you might prefer the Mediterranean diet.

Although there are similarities among all three diets, the MIND diet is the only one that encourages the consumption of foods that have been found to promote cognitive health.

There is a saying that “what’s good for your heart is good for your brain.” So please start switching over to the MIND diet while eliminating foods high in calories and low in nutrients. You will feel better and your brain will stay healthier longer.


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Caring for yourself and others with good nutrition

Mary Collette Rogers interviewed me on her podcast “The Healthy Kitchen Companion.”

Find out more about Mary’s programs around The New Kitchen Way: cookhappylivehealthy.org/blog/

Discover insights and tools for handling the challenges of caregiving, particularly stress. Sobering statistics highlight the need for addressing this topic: In 2017, fully 16 million friends and family provided 18 billion hours of unpaid care for 5½ million Americans with Alzheimer’s. That figure, of course, accounts for just one of many chronic conditions that required the services of caregivers.

Equally important is the need for self-care since it is said that at some point you’ll either be a caregiver or be cared for yourself. Self-care can minimize the need for care from others, or make it possible to provide care to those you love.

In this conversation, Barbra Cohn and Mary Collette Rogers share a wealth of knowledge and strategies for using the power of good nutrition to alleviate the stress of caregiving–whether for yourself or others.

Barbra, author of Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia, provides solid nutritional advice for
** Introducing the Stress Vitamins and minerals, and foods where they can be found
** How neurotransmitters like serotonin improve mood and how to use natural mood boosters in foods to uplift mood
** Why breakfast is the most important meal of the day for caregivers and key breakfast foods
** Barbra’s secret for boosting immunity, staying hydrated and replenishing nutrients drained by stress

Mary Collette, Healthy Kitchen Companion, explores how to ensure that Barbra’s nutritional wisdom doesn’t just get parked at the kitchen door. With The New Kitchen Way, her integrated approach to meal making, you’ll see good nutrition advice actually show up on your table–deliciously and easily. Learn
** About the power of organization and why it works as well in the kitchen as the business world
** How chaos and lack of control are the true culprits that sabotage kitchen fun and success
** How organization alleviates stress when you invite it into your kitchen and meal making
** How the kitchen and meal making can be broken down into just six areas, and
** How the 6 KitchenSmart Strategies easily guide you to get those six areas under control, leaving you relieved and confident about making nourishing meals.

 

 

Have you tried any of these natural ways to combat depression?

St. John's Wort capsulesOctober 11 is National Depression Screening Day. If you are feeling overwhelmed, depressed or have a hard time getting out of bed in the morning because you don’t want to face the world it’s time to evaluate your emotional health. You can take an anonymous screening online here: Select a state to find a screening.

If you are suicidal please call the national suicide prevention lifeline: 1-800-273-8255.  The Lifeline provides 24/7 free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones.


If you have mild to moderate depression, there are a number of proven natural supplements and modalities that can help.

While I cared for my husband who had younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease, I lived behind a persona of forced cheerfulness because I didn’t want anyone to know that my private world was being deconstructed bit by bit. I went through bouts of depression and grieving periods. I took the supplement St. John’s wort, danced and meditated. I met with girlfriends and did yoga. I also used essential oils and tried to eat well. It all helped.

I gave St John’s wort to my husband, too, until he was in late-stage Alzheimer’s disease. By then he needed a pharmaceutical anti-depressant. But the St. John’s wort worked well for mild to moderate depression.

  1. Here’s what we know about St. John’s wort
  • It is a safe and effective way to treat mild to moderate depression over long periods of time
  • Is similarly effective as standard antidepressants
  • It has minimal side effects when compared to standard antidepressants

One study done on laboratory animals found that St, John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) has antidepressant properties similar to standard antidepressants. The antidepressant profile of H. perforatum is closely related to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors class of antidepressants.

A Swiss study evaluated 440 patients suffering from mild to moderate depression and treated them with 500 mg. of St. John’s wort for up to one year. Although mild side effects such as upset stomach were reported—which may or may NOT have been related to the treatment—the researchers reported that is a safe and effective way to treat mild to moderate depression over long periods of time. They also found that it is especially suitable for preventing a relapse.

A meta-analysis at the Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich, Germany analyzed 29 trials (which included 5,489 patients), comparing St. John’s wort with placebo or standard antidepressants. The evidence suggests that the hypericum extracts tested in the included trials a) are superior to placebo in patients with major depression; b) are similarly effective as standard antidepressants; c) and have fewer side effects than standard antidepressants.

2. Support serotonin levels. Omega 3 fatty acids are rich in DHA, the major unsaturated fat in the brain. Your brain is 60% fat and depends on the fat you ingest from food. Healthy fats found in cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel, sardines, and in olive oil, walnuts, flax and avocado will improve your mood. It is important to cook with a healthy fat such as olive oil, walnut or avocado in order to feed your brain! Canola oil, peanut oil, and safflower are not able to provide you with the fat your brain needs.

As a nutrition educator, I also like to recommend foods that increase the “happy” neurotransmitter serotonin. Whole grains, sweet potatoes, brown rice, oatmeal, buckwheat, millet, quinoa, support your brain’s ability to process more serotonin.

3. Drink water. Your brain needs to stay hydrated. Make sure you drink at least six tall glasses of water every day. When my mom went into the hospital for severe dehydration, among other things, she began hallucinating. A psychiatrist called to tell me “your mom has full-blown dementia.” I said, “No she doesn’t,”  and refused to allow the doctor to prescribe an anti-psychotic prescription. Sure enough, several days later my mom sounded completely normal. Her body had been dehydrated, as well as her brain. The simple habit of drinking water is sometimes all we need to maintain mood and mental health.

4. The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments published a report in the “Canadian Journal of Psychiatry” in 2016 with this conclusion: For the management of mild to moderate depression it says exercise, light therapy, St. John’s wort, omega-3 fatty acids, SAM-e, and yoga are recommended as first- or second-line treatments.

5. A recently published study in the “Journal of Clinical Medicine” concluded that individuals who engaged in a meditative movement practice of Tai Chi, Qigong, or Yoga showed significantly improved treatment remission rates. The researchers conclude that emphasizing the therapeutic effects of meditative movements for treating MDD (Major Depressive Disorder) is critical because it may provide a useful alternative to existing mainstream treatments (drug therapy and psychotherapy) for MDD. Given the fact that meditative movements are safe and easily accessible, clinicians may consider recommending meditative movements for symptomatic management in this population.

6. Music is the universal language as well as one of the most common ways to affect mood.  My husband was never without head phones as he listened to music and wandered through the halls of the memory care home where he lived the last two years of his life. Music made him happy. It makes toddlers spin until they’re dizzy, teens hand bang until their necks get sore, and adults drum their car’s steering wheel. Music also helps decrease anxiety and improves functioning of depressed individuals as found in a meta-analysis that concluded music therapy provides short-term beneficial effects for people with depression. 

Other natural ways to combat depression

7. Create a calm environment. Light candles at dinner, play classical music, have a vase of fresh flowers on the table.

8. Get some physical exercise every day; even just a 20 minute walk helps tremendously.

9. Use aromatherapy oils. For more information about the use of aromatherapy to reduce stress, improve immunity, reduce agitation, and to promote relaxation read chapter 18 “Aromatherapy” in “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” by Barbra Cohn

10. Vitamin B complex optimizes cognitive activity and brain function, has a positive effect on memory, learning capacity and attention span, and supports a healthy nervous system and a stable mood. Vitamins B6 and B12, in particular, play a role in the synthesis of serotonin, the neurotransmitter linked to improving memory, lifting mood and regulating sleep.

11. Maintain your social connections. Loneliness can actually lead to health problems and mental decline. Join a group—any kind of group: worship,  hiking, scrabble, table tennis, knitting, discussion group or book club. Volunteer at a food bank, soup kitchen or animal shelter. It’s important to stay connected and to feel as though you are a contributing member of society.

12. Sleep well by getting to bed before 11:00 pm, eating your last meal before 8pm, turning off your electronic devices, and eliminating light in your bedroom. If you have trouble sleeping consider using a lavender essential oil spray on your pillow or a sachet of lavender inserted into the pillowcase. There are lots of natural sleep aids available at your local health food store, such as melatonin, calcium/magnesium, valerian, hops, etc. Consult with a nutritional consultant about what might work best for you.

“Surround yourself with people who are only going to lift you higher.” anonymous


 

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Do you have any of these risk factors for Alzheimers?

Woman with hypertension treating by a nurse

  1. Dizziness when standing up
  2. Reduced levels of plasmalogens
  3. High blood pressure
  4. Obesity
  5. Alcohol
  6. Head trauma
  7. Family history
  8. Smoking
  9. Age
  10. Social Isolation (see Loneliness vs. Aloneness: Why one is dangerous to your health

Most people know that old age is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, after age 65 the risk of Alzheimer’s doubles every five years. And after age 85 one out of three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or other form of dementia. You’ve probably also heard that obesity, alcohol consumption, head trauma, family history, smoking, and social isolation put you at increase risk.

But here are a few risk factors that you may not have heard about.

Dizziness when standing up

A new risk factor, and a concern for me personally, is orthostatic hypotension (OH), a fancy name for feeling  dizzy when you stand up. According to a new study, middle-aged people who experience orthostatic hypotension may have a higher risk of developing dementia later in life. The study analyzed data from 11,709 participants without a history of coronary heart disease or stroke. It concluded that individuals who experience a drop in systolic blood pressure (the bottom number) of at least 20 mm Hg or a drop in diastolic blood pressure (the top number) of at least 10 mm Hg on standing are said to have orthostatic hypotension.

Over a 25-year period, 1,068 participants developed dementia and 842 had an ischemic stroke. Compared to persons without OH at baseline, those with OH had a higher risk of dementia and ischemic stroke. Persons with OH had greater, although insignificant, cognitive decline over 20 years. But since the study doesn’t take any other risk factors into consideration, I’m not going to lose sleep over this.

2. We’ve heard how omega 3 fatty acids are necessary for a healthy cardiovascular system. But if your liver doesn’t process these key lipids properly it can spell trouble in your brain.

Reduced levels of plasmalogens — a class of lipids created in the liver that are integral to cell membranes in the brain — are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to new research presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2018 by Mitchel A. Kling, MD, an associate professor of Psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A reduced level is also implicated in Down’s Syndrome and Parkinson’s disease.

In 2012, scientists found a 40% reduction in plasmalogen content of white matter in the brain in individuals with early stage Alzheimer’s.

Plasmalogens are created in the liver and are dispersed through the blood stream in the form of lipoproteins, which also transport cholesterol and other lipids to and from cells and tissues throughout the body, including the brain. The researchers measured several plasmalogens including those containing omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), as well as an omega-6 fatty acid and closely-related non-plasmalogen lipids, in blood-based fluids collected from two groups. The first group included 1,547 subjects that have Alzheimer’s disease, MCI or significant memory concerns (SMC), and subjects who were cognitively normal (CN) and who are enrolled in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The second group included 112 subjects from the Penn Memory Center, including those with Alzheimer’s, MCI, and CN.

“Our findings provide renewed hope for the creation of new treatment and prevention approaches for Alzheimer’s disease,” Kling said. “Moving forward, we’re examining the connections between plasmalogens, other lipids, and cognition, in addition to gene expression in the liver and the brain. While we’re in the early stages of discovering how the liver, lipids, and diet are related to Alzheimer’s disease and neurodegeneration, it’s been promising.”



You would think that taking omega 3s would help, right? Well, according to the study, they don’t. However, plasmalogens from mussels are being sold in Japan and Singapore as a health supplement for Alzheimer’s disease. See Scallop-derived PLASMALOGEN. There is also a Singapore product for sale in the U.S. that supposedly helps your body increase the level of plasmalogens. It’s called NeuroREGAIN. You can read about it here: NeuroREGAIN

According to the first study cited, these products don’t help because of the pH in the
digestive system and the ability to utilize the ingredients.
But it’s up to you. I tried lots of things with my husband, and if he were still alive I’d probably try this product, too.


3. Recently, researchers from the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL, set up a study funded by the National Institutes of Health to look for links between blood pressure and physical markers of brain health in older adults. The findings are published in the July 11, 2018, online issue of Neurology. Study co-author Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis explains the types of pathology they were searching for.

“We researched whether blood pressure in later life was associated with signs of brain aging that include plaques and tangles linked to Alzheimer’s disease, and brain lesions called infarcts, areas of dead tissue caused by a blockage of the blood supply, which can increase with age, often go undetected and can lead to stroke, said Arvanitakis.”

Healthy blood pressure is less than 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mmHg). The higher number is called systolic blood pressure, the pressure in the blood vessels when the heart beats. The lower number is called diastolic blood pressure, the pressure when the heart is at rest.

For the study, 1,288 older people were followed until they died, which was an average of eight years later. The average age at death was 89 years. Blood pressure was documented yearly for each participant and autopsies were conducted on their brains after death. The average systolic blood pressure for those enrolled in the study was 134 mmHg and the average diastolic blood pressure was 71 mmHg. Two-thirds of the participants had a history of high blood pressure, and 87 percent were taking high blood pressure medication. A total of 48 percent of the participants had one or more brain infarct lesions.

Researchers found that the risk of brain lesions was higher in people with higher average systolic blood pressure across the years. For a person with one standard deviation above the average systolic blood pressure, for example 147 mmHg versus 134 mmHg, there was a 46 percent increased risk of having one or more brain lesions, specifically infarcts. For comparison, the effect of an increase by one standard deviation on the risk of having one or more brain infarcts was the equivalent of nine years of brain aging.

Those with one standard deviation above the average systolic blood pressure also had a 46 percent greater chance of having large lesions and a 36 percent greater risk of very small lesions. Arvanitakis noted that an important additional result of the study was that people with a declining systolic blood pressure also had an increased risk of one or more brain lesions, so it was not just the level but also the declining blood pressure which was associated with brain lesions.

Separately, higher average diastolic blood pressure was also related to brain infarct lesions. People who had an increase of one standard deviation from an average diastolic blood pressure, for example from 71 mmHg to 79 mmHg, had a 28 percent greater risk of one or more brain lesions.

The results did not change when researchers controlled for other factors that could affect the risk of brain lesions, such as whether they used high blood pressure drugs.

When looking for signs of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain at autopsy, researchers found a link between higher average late-life systolic blood pressure across the years before death and a higher number of tangles, but not plaques. Arvanitakis said this link is difficult to interpret and will need more research.

 The bottom line is be aware of your blood pressure and how to maintain healthy levels.

Natural remedies to support healthy blood pressure and circulation:

  • Magnesium
  • Potassium
  • Vitamin B complex
  • Vitamin C
  • CoQ10
  • Resveratrol
  • Astaxanthin
  • Nattokinase
  • Pomegranate
  • Acetyl-L-carnitine

A healthy heart supports a healthy brain. Here are 12 ways to support both.

12 ways to support a healthy heart

  1. Eat a nutritious, high-fiber, low-fat heart healthy diet.
  2. Include foods high in phytonutrients (the nutrients found in plants)
  3. Get plenty of foods containing omega-3 fatty acids (found in cold water fish). Vegetarians should take flax-seed oil or ground flax seed.
  4. Take nutritional supplements proven to support a healthy heart
  5. Practice a stress reduction technique such as yoga or meditation
  6. Exercise
  7. Stop smoking!
  8. Reduce and/or avoid alcohol
  9. Get an annual physical exam to rule out other health factor risks
  10. Protect yourself from environmental toxins
  11. Drink 6 to 8 glasses of purified, filtered water every day
  12. Get plenty of restful sleep!

 

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Helpin order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Are you putting yourself at risk for dementia with OTC medications and prescription drugs?

Reading Instructions from PharmacyA new study links the increased risk of dementia with certain medications. (Anticholinergic drugs and risk of dementia: case-control study) The focus of the study was on drugs that have anticholinergic effects. Acetylcholine is vital to memory and learning. There are lower levels of this neurotransmitter in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, animal studies have shown that anticholinergic drugs may contribute to brain inflammation, another risk factor for dementia.

It’s estimated that approximately 50% of adults in the U.S. take one or more medications with an anticholinergic effect. Some of the most common are:

  • amitriptyline (Endep, Elavil), paroxetine (Paxil, Pexeva), and bupropion (Aplenzin, Wellbutin). These drugs are commonly taken for depression)
  • oxybutynin and tolterodine, taken for an overactive bladder, found in Ditropan, Oxytrol.
  • diphenhydramine, a common antihistamine found in: Advil PM, Aleve PM, Bayer PM, Benadryl, Excedrin PM, Nytol, Simply Sleep, Sominex, Tylenol PM, Unisom, etc.
  • Chlorpheniramine, found in Actifed, Allergy & Congestion RElief, Chlor-Trimeton, Codeprex, Efidac-24 Chlorpheniramine, etc.

According to Shelly Gray, professor pharmacy at the University of Washington, and author of  Cumulative Use of Strong Anticholinergics and Incident Dementia” (March 2015, JAMA Internal Med.), the longer people took the drugs and the higher the dose, the higher the risk of dementia, although it’s important to note that short-term use was not linked to higher risks.

Gray suggested that people, especially seniors, who have trouble sleeping find a non-drug therapy for insomnia Celexa and Prozac for depression and Claritin for allergies.  She emphasized that it is important to speak with one’s doctor before stopping a medication that you have been taking.

Natural alternatives

Help for depression

  1. Get some physical exercise every day; even just a 20 minute walk helps tremendously.
  2. Use aromatherapy oils. For more information about the use of aromatherapy to reduce stress, improve immunity, reduce agitation, and to promote relaxation read chapter 18 “Aromatherapy” in “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” by Barbra Cohn
  3.  I gave my husband Ginkgo biloba for depression (and also took it myself). It helped right up until he was in late stage Alzheimer’s. One word of advice, not all brands are efficacious, so pick one carefully. Also note that it takes about 6 weeks to notice an effect. This is a typical difference of taking a pharmaceutical versus a natural remedy.
  4. Vitamin B complex optimizes cognitive activity and brain function, has a positive effect on memory, learning capacity and attention span, and supports a healthy nervous system and a stable mood. Vitamins B6 and B12, in particular, play a role in the synthesis of serotonin, the neurotransmitter linked to improving memory, lifting mood and regulating sleep.
  5. Omega-3 fatty acids are rich in DHA, the major unsaturated fat in the brain. This long-chain fatty acid provides the necessary fluid quality to the membranes of the nerve cells so that electrical nerve impulses can flow easily along the circuits of the brain. One study found that Alzheimer’s patients given an omega-3-rich supplement experienced a significant improvement in their quality of life.
  6. Maintain your social connections. Loneliness can actually lead to health problems and mental decline. Join a group—any kind of group: worship,  hiking, scrabble, table tennis, knitting, discussion group, or book club. Volunteer at a food bank, soup kitchen or animal shelter. It’s important to stay connected and to feel as though you are a contributing member of society.

Natural sleep aids

  1. Try valerian, passion-flower or skullcap herbal tea at least a couple of hours before bedtime.
  2. A cup of warm milk with a small pinch of cardamom, coriander, cinnamon, turmeric and cumin, and an 1/8 of a tsp of ghee is a tasty and relaxing bedtime drink. The calcium in the milk is a muscle relaxant and the Indian spices help induce relaxation. Experiment to see which spices you like.
  3. Eat a banana. Bananas contain potassium and magnesium that help reduce risk of muscle cramps. These two minerals also support heart health and cognitive function.
  4. A drop in blood sugar during the night can cause us to wake up. Although it’s better to not go to sleep on a full stomach, a small protein snack such as a slice of cheese or smear of peanut butter on a cracker can help maintain balanced blood sugar.
  5. Melatonin supplements help some people, but you might have to experiment with the dosage. I like Natural Vitality’s Natural Calm, a powdered calcium supplement that you put in water or juice. I also like the homeopathic remedy Hyland’s Calms Forte.
  6. Spritz lavender oil on your pillow or put a sachet of lavender flowers under your pillow.

Natural antihistamines

  1. Quercetin is a bioflavonoid that is naturally found in plant foods such as apples, cruciferous vegetables (like broccoli or cauliflower), onions/shallots, green tea and citrus fruits. It stabilizes the release of histamines and helps to naturally control allergy symptoms.
  2. Apple cider vinegar is my new “go to” remedy for almost everything. I take 1 Tablespoon everyday by pinching my nose and drinking water to flush it down. It helps alkalize the body and supports immune function.
  3. Butterbur is a natural herb that is sold as an extract. A study published in August 2005 in Phytotherapy Research found that when compared to an antihistamine, the butterbur extract worked just as well, without the side effect of drowsiness.
  4. Remember that Claritin does not contain diphenhydramine, so use it by all means if these other remedies do not do the trick.

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Can depression be a sign of dementia?

Depressed Senior Woman Sitting OutsideDepression can affect our memory, and it can result from not being able to do the things that were once easy for us, as in the case of Alzheimer’s or dementia. Depression can result from a number of factors and it often appears differently in different people

Some people are able to hide the fact that they are terribly depressed. I did. I tried to put on a happy face during my husband’s illness, but inside I often felt as though I was dying. Following the recent suicides of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain, we have to remind ourselves that we usually don’t know what is happening inside someone else’s head.

Before my husband was diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease he was withdrawn and depressed. I didn’t know what exactly what was going on, and he was unable to articulate how he felt. I eventually realized that he was depressed because the things that were once effortless for him to do, such as driving around town or figuring out how much tip to leave in a restaurant, had become difficult.

Alzheimer’s and depression often occur simultaneously, which often makes it difficult for physicians to make a diagnosis without further testing. According to James M. Ellison, MD of the Swank Memory Care Center, Christiana Care Health System, approximately half of individuals affected by Alzheimer’s disease will experience clinically significant depressive symptoms at some point.  Depression can occur during any phase of the illness.

Symptoms common to Alzheimer’s and depression

  • Loss of interest in things that were once enjoyable
  • Memory issues
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Social withdrawal or isolation
  • Impaired concentration
  • Eating too much or too little
  • Crying, feelings of hopelessness, despair
  • Unmotivated
  • Lack of energy, lethargy, apathy
  • Irritability
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

A case of the chicken or the egg: which came first, Alzheimer’s or depression?

Some health professionals think that depression can put one at greater risk for Alzheimer’s. There is also a belief that depression is a symptom of Alzheimer’s. In any case, physicians feel that a person with dementia who is depressed can experience a quicker cognitive decline and need to rely more on caregivers.

What to do?

8 natural ways to combat depression.

Antidepressants may not work as well with people who have Alzheimer’s and are depressed. Before resorting to antidepressants and other drugs,  try these options:

  1. Provide a safe and calm environment. Light candles at dinner, play classical music, have a vase of fresh flowers on the table.
  2. Get some physical exercise every day; even just a 20 minute walk helps tremendously.
  3. Use aromatherapy oils. For more information about the use of aromatherapy to reduce stress, improve immunity, reduce agitation, and to promote relaxation read chapter 18 “Aromatherapy” in “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” by Barbra Cohn
  4.  I gave my husband Ginkgo biloba for depression (and also took it myself). It helped right up until he was in late stage Alzheimer’s. One word of advice, not all brands are efficacious, so pick one carefully. Also note that it takes about 6 weeks to notice an effect. This is a typical difference of taking a pharmaceutical versus a natural remedy.
  5. Vitamin B complex optimizes cognitive activity and brain function, has a positive effect on memory, learning capacity and attention span, and supports a healthy nervous system and a stable mood. Vitamins B6 and B12, in particular, play a role in the synthesis of serotonin, the neurotransmitter linked to improving memory, lifting mood and regulating sleep.
  6. Omega-3 fatty acids are rich in DHA, the major unsaturated fat in the brain. This long-chain fatty acid provides the necessary fluid quality to the membranes of the nerve cells so that electrical nerve impulses can flow easily along the circuits of the brain. One study found that Alzheimer’s patients given an omega-3-rich supplement experienced a significant improvement in their quality of life.
  7. Maintain your social connections. Loneliness can actually lead to health problems and mental decline. Join a group—any kind of group: worship,  hiking, scrabble, table tennis, knitting, discussion group, or book club. Volunteer at a food bank, soup kitchen or animal shelter. It’s important to stay connected and to feel as though you are a contributing member of society.
  8. Sleep well by getting to bed before 11:00 pm, eating your last meal before 8pm, turning off your electronic devices, and eliminating light in your bedroom. Studies have indicated that sleep deprivation can increase risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. If you have trouble sleeping consider using a lavender essential oil spray on your pillow or a sachet of lavender inserted into the pillowcase. There are lots of natural sleep aids available at your local health food store, such as melatonin, calcium/magnesium, valerian, hops, etc. Consult with a nutritional consultant about what might work best for you.

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.