Men: Are you taking care of yourself?

仲の良い父と娘Happy Father’s Day to all men who play a caring role in the life of a child, and kudos for  all that you do. But let me ask you this: Do you take care of yourself? Typically, most men take better care of their cars than themselves. Most men wait until a symptom pops up, and by then the illness or disease has progressed.

I’m not going to give you a lecture about how you should make an appointment tomorrow to get a routine preventative check-up, but hopefully after going through the following list, you’ll see my point.

Take this quiz to see how much you really know about men’s health. 

1) As a man gets older, it’s almost inevitable that he:

  1. loses interest in sex
  2. has a difficult time maintaining an erection
  3. doesn’t need to exercise as much
  4. develops an enlarged prostate

2) To detect prostate cancer early, a man should:

  1. have a colonoscopy
  2. practice a monthly self prostate examination
  3. have a digital rectal exam and PSA blood test
  4. have a sonogram of his prostate every year

3) Impotence can result from:

  1. drinking too much alcohol
  2. recreational drug use (smoking marijuana)
  3. high blood pressure
  4. diabetes
  5. all of the above

4) 75% of prostate cancer occurs in:

  1. Hispanic men
  2. men over 65
  3. men who eat a low-fat diet
  4. men with low testosterone levels

5) The most common cancer among men is:

  1. prostate cancer
  2. lung cancer
  3. skin cancer
  4. colon cancer

6) Which racial/ethnic group is most likely to develop prostate cancer?

  1. Caucasian
  2. Asian
  3. Hispanic
  4. African-American

7) A common risk factor for developing prostate cancer is:

  1. lack of exercise
  2. high fat diet
  3. high testosterone levels
  4. growing older
  5. all of the above

8) What beverage has been found to support prostate health?

  1. beer
  2. green tea
  3. orange juice
  4. red wine

9) What common food has been found to support prostate health?

  1. oranges
  2. tomatoes
  3. beef
  4. cheese

10) Which disease is considered the number one cause of death among American males?

  1. diabetes
  2. prostate cancer
  3. obesity
  4. cardiovascular disease

11) Cardiovascular disease kills far more men and women than cancer.

  1. True
  2. False

12) Eating a diet that includes plenty of pasta, potatoes and white rice can reduce your risk of heart disease.

  1. True
  2. False

13) The heart muscle is totally responsible for maintaining normal blood pressure levels.

  1. True
  2. False

14) Cardiovascular disease is hereditary and cannot be prevented.

  1. True
  2. False

15) CVD starts in the teenage years.

  1. True
  2. False

16) An aspirin a day is the best way to thin the blood, in order to reduce the chance of stroke and heart attack.

  1. True
  2. False

17) High blood cholesterol is the best overall indicator of cardiovascular disease.

  1. True
  2. False

18) Statistics show that the stress of caregiving can result in chronic disease for the caregiver and take as many as ten years off one’s life.


Answers:

1) d

2) g

3) e- all of the above. Not smoking, eating a healthy diet, not overdoing it when it comes to drinking, regular exercise, getting enough sleep, will all help support normal blood flow. Also, Ginkgo biloba extract helps support normal blood flow to the penis

4) b. Simply growing older increases a man’s risk. Seventy-five percent of prostate cancer occurs in men over 65 with only 7% diagnosed in men under 60 years of age.

5) c. Skin cancer is the number one form of cancer in the US. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men next to skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men after lung cancer.

6) d. African-American males have the highest incidence of prostate cancer, a third higher than white males, and African-American males are also twice as likely to die from it.

7) e. Also, men who have higher testosterone levels, or who eat a high fat diet have been shown to have an increased risk of developing prostate cancer.

8) b. Green tea is chock full of antioxidants that have been shown to reduce cancer. Red wine, on the other hand, is a natural preventative against cardiovascular disease.

9) b. Tomatoes contain lycopene, especially potent in the fight against prostate cancer.

10) d. Among major disease groups, heart disease is the leading cause of death within the elderly population.

11) True. Although cancer fears are more common, cardiovascular disease is the chief cause of death and disability in the United States today. It affects close to 60 million Americans and every year more than a million people suffer from new or recurrent heart attacks. In fact,every 20 seconds a person in the United States has a heart attack, and one-third of these attacks leads to death. The American Heart Association calls CVD “the silent epidemic.”

12) False. For years we were told that a heart-healthy diet included foods low in fat and high in carbohydrates, such as fruits, veggies, legumes, grains and other starches. But now experts are saying that overloading on carbohydrates (especially the wrong kind) can make you fat and increase your risk of heart disease. Eating foods with a high glycemic index—such as cookies, cake, candy, bagels, pasta, white rice, refined bread and grains, potatoes and potato chips—raises blood sugar and insulin levels, which in turn stimulates the production of triglycerides (blood fats that raise heart disease risk).

13) False. Your kidneys, blood vessels and heart all control blood pressure. In order to maintain healthy blood pressure and keep blood moving, the walls of your arteries, capillaries and veins need to be flexible and strong. Research has shown that nutrients such as Co-Q10, hawthorne, red wine polyphenols, notoginseng (a cousin of ginseng), and astragalus help strengthen blood flow throughout the entire body, maintaining healthy blood pressure. In addition, EDTA (the main ingredient in Health Freedom Nutrition’s Cardio Clear) removes heavy metals and toxins that interfere with the production of nitric oxide, a major factor in controlling blood pressure.

14) False. Even if there’s heart disease in your family, and even if you have high cholesterol, combining an regular exercise program with and a Mediterranean based diet and healthy lifestyle (no smoking, reduced alcohol consumption) can dramatically reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke.

15) True. Dr. Scoot Calig, M.D., a pediatrician at West Hills Medical Center and an assistant clinical professor at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, says, “It’s important to keep in mind that the development of cardiovascular disease begins in the teenage years. Studies have shown that by that time, arterial plaque formation is well under way.”  Just another reason to exercise, eat a healthy diet, and take nutritional supplements such as oral EDTA to strengthen the heart and arteries and clear out toxic metals that inhibit the production of nitric oxide.

16) False. For years, aspirin has been prescribed after a heart attack, in order to avoid a subsequent heart attack. And now, a panel of experts is recommending aspirin as a precaution against heart disease for all at-risk, healthy adults over 40. But Alfred Berg, M.D., of the University of Washington, head of the panel says, “Do not assume that an aspirin a day is without risk.” Aspirin can cause intestinal bleeding and hemorrhagic stroke. Herbs such as hawthorne, nattokinase, garlic and Ginkgo biloba have the ability to thin the blood like aspirin, without damaging the esophageal and intestinal linings, or exacerbating ulcers.

17) False. Homocysteine—a by-product of the amino acid methionine— is a more sensitive indicator of cardiovascular health than cholesterol. Too much of it increases injury to arterial walls, as well as accelerates oxidation and accumulation of cholesterol in blood vessel. The good news is that folic acid, and vitamins B6 and B12 help keep homocysteine levels low!

18) True—for men and women! Click here to read 16 Stress-busters to nourish your body, mind and soul

Have a happy Father’s Day, and please take care of your health so you can continue to enjoy life and be a support and friend to everyone who loves you.


For dozens of general health tips and caregiving help read Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s and Dementia  by Barbra Cohn.image

6 surprising ways to increase your chances of living a healthy longer life

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Ponce de Leon claimed to have discovered the Fountain of Youth in Florida. I’ve been to Warm Mineral Springs, in North Port, Florida, which lays claim to de Leon’s discovery and calls itself the Fountain of Youth. Another natural spring in northwest Florida in Ponce de Leon springs State Park also calls itself the Fountain of Youth. I am a frequent visitor to hot springs (see my article on AAA’s Encompass website: ) and I feel refreshed and rejuvenated after soaking for several hours. But I need something stronger than a dose of calcium carbonate or sulphur to slow down the ticking of the clock, as far as my skin, muscles and cells are concerned.

I’ve asked myself and my guess is that you have also pondered the age-old question “would you want to live forever?”  The children’s book “Tuck Everlasting” by Natalie Babbitt explores the concept of immortality and explores whether living forever is as desirable as it may appear to be.

The typical response is only if I could stay healthy and vibrant. In our life time we will most likely not attain immortality, but there are a number of anti-aging tricks for slowing down the clock.

Age defying nutrients

  1. Study finds link between high EPA and DHA Omega-3 blood levels and decreased risk of death  Higher Omega-3 levels are linked to longer life. In a 15-year study of 6,500 elderly women, those with the highest blood concentration of omega-3 fatty acids were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause compared to those with the lowest levels. The researchers estimated that intakes of about 1 gram per day of EPA and DHA would be enough for a woman with the lowest blood serum concentration to shift to the group with the highest concentration. How? By taking one to three soft-gels of a high-quality omega-3 supplement daily or one teaspoon of a liquid supplement. Another option is to eat two or three salmon fillets each week.
  2. Study Finds Association Between Eating Hot Peppers And Decreased Mortality  If you like hot chile peppers eat more of them! After studying more than 16,000 adults, researchers at the University of Vermont found that those who ate chili peppers had a lower risk of dying from heart disease or stroke. The study did not indicate the quantity of peppers consumed, but capsaicin, the active ingredient that makes peppers “hot” aids in preventing obesity, supports blood flow, reduces inflammation and has antimicrobial properties.
  3. Beans, beans the musical fruit, the more you eat the more you toot. There’s another reason to eat beans. They contain phytates, nutritional compounds that strengthen the immune system and kill cancer cells. They also support brain health and are said to reverse the aging process at the cellular level. Beans are also high in fiber which helps lower cholesterol and regulate blood sugar.
  4. Two studies found that those with higher levels of vitamin D have longer telomeres, and thus may actually age more slowly than people with low vitamin D levels. Telomeres are the caps at the end of each strand of DNA that protect our chromosomes. A good analogy is that they are like the plastic tips at the end of shoelaces. Without the coating, shoelaces become frayed until they can no longer do their job.  Similarly, without telomeres DNA strands become damaged and then cells can’t do their job.  A study that included 4,347 participants in which 47% were men and 42% were women, researchers concluded that there is positive association between vitamin D levels and telomere length. This means that people with higher levels of vitamin D may actually age more slowly than people with lower levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D reduces the effects of chronic inflammation and may play a role in protecting your body from deteriorating from diseases associated with aging.The association of telomere length and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in US adults: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
  5. The traditional diet in Okinawa is anchored by root vegetables, especially sweet potatoes, green and yellow vegetables, soybean-based foods, and medicinal plants. Another feature of the Okinawan diet is the consumption of green tea. There have been more than 1000 studies done on the antioxidants found in green tea, demonstrating how they may be providing some level of chemoprevention in prostate and breast cancer. Green tea has also been shown to help reduce cardiovascular disease. Drink green tea for health and relaxation

    Many characteristics of the traditional Okinawan diet are shared with other healthy dietary patterns, including the traditional Mediterranean diet, DASH diet, and Portfolio diet. All these dietary patterns are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, among other age-associated diseases. Overall, the important shared features of these healthy dietary patterns include: high intake of unrefined carbohydrates, moderate protein intake with emphasis on vegetables/legumes, fish, and lean meats as sources, and a healthy fat profile (higher in mono/polyunsaturated fats, lower in saturated fat; rich in omega-3). The healthy fat intake is likely one mechanism for reducing inflammation, optimizing cholesterol, and other risk factors. Additionally, the lower caloric density of plant-rich diets results in lower caloric intake with concomitant high intake of phytonutrients and antioxidants. Other shared features include low glycemic load, less inflammation and oxidative stress, and potential modulation of aging-related biological pathways. This may reduce risk for chronic age-associated diseases and promote healthy aging and longevity.

    Social interaction is important

     

  6.  Dan Buettler, author of The Blue Zones of Happiness: Lessons From the World’s Happiest People, Oct 3, 2017 researched communities around the world to find out what centenarians had in common. These amazing people had one thing in common: strong social relationships. Being socially connected actually helps you to live longer! Studies are showing that loneliness might be a bigger health risk than smoking or obesity. In fact, loneliness and social isolation is considered not just a psychological issue but a medical one that can actually kill you. According to a far-reaching study (meta-analysis of scientific literature on the subject January 1980 to February 2014) conducted by Brigham Young University, social isolation and loneliness is as dangerous to health as smoking 15 cigarettes and drinking six ounces of alcohol a day, and increases one’s likelihood of death by 32%. Isolation and feeling alone has also been shown to contribute to depression, cognitive decline, the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, and poor recovery from illness and surgery.

If you are feeling a lonely or isolated, get ahead of the lonely curve now to expand your social network. Don’t put it off. Getting socially connected might take some effort, but it is definitely worth it for so many reasons. You will gain friendship, companionship, better health, and in the process you will be giving of yourself, which is the best gift of all.


“Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” by Barbra Cohn contains a treasure trove of information on how to stay connected with your loved one, keep calm, improve immunity, reduce stress and feel happier and healthier. Plus, it includes 20 healing modalities that the caregiver can do alone or with their loved one. Available wherever fine books are sold and on Amazon.


BarbraCohn__

Could leaky gut cause Alzheimer’s?

Leaky Gut Syndrome - Irritable Bowel Syndrome

When I took my husband to a “holistic” neurologist almost two decades ago she questioned him for hours about his medical and lifestyle history. Together, we came up with a hypothesis that my husband’s Alzheimer’s could have been triggered by his life-long inflammation issues and digestive problems. As a child Morris suffered from eczema and severe asthma. He was an allergic adult with poor digestion.

We theorized that Morris had leaky gut syndrome caused by intestinal permeability. Although this is not typically taught in medical school, the term “leaky gut syndrome” is being studied more and more as people complain of various symptoms such as bloating, gas, food sensitivities and unexplained aches and pains.

Basically, the syndrome occurs when tight junctions in the gut, which control what passes through the lining of the small intestine, don’t work properly. Inflammation in the gut, due to poor eating habits, low levels of healthy intestinal bacteria, infections, intestinal parasites, over-use of medications (especially NSAIDs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), and imbalanced gastric juices can all lead to a weakening of the intestinal lining. Tiny breaks in the tissue lining can result in leaky gut syndrome, allowing protein molecules to travel via the blood throughout the body all the way to the brain. Antibodies attack the proteins which are viewed as foreign enemies in the blood bathing the brain, which results in inflammation.

(Chapters 20 and 31 in “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey through Alzheimer’s and Dementia” contain more information about ayurveda and nutrition that calms down the nervous system and supports immunity.)  

What is Inflammation?
Inflammation is part of the immune system’s response to defend you against microbial
infections. It is the body’s first line of defense against the invasion of microorganisms such as bacteria and viruses, and it is activated rapidly after infection. The microbes are detected as foreign to the body by immune cells such as macrophages, which literally means “big eater.” Macrophages engulf foreign microorganisms and then release cytokines and chemokines that attract other cells that help in regulating the infected or affected area. Blood flow to the area is increased, which you notice when the area around a cut swells, turns red and feels warm. These are all signs of external inflammation. The chronic internal inflammation caused by leaky gut can result in inflammatory conditions leading to a host of diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease.

Approximately 70% of your immune system cells are found in your gut.

In one study, researchers found that when they compared healthy mice to mice with induced Alzheimer’s symptoms the sick mice had a different composition of gut bacteria. The researchers also studied Alzheimer’s disease in mice that completely lacked bacteria to further test the relationship between intestinal bacteria and the disease. Mice without bacteria had a significantly smaller amount of beta-amyloid plaque in the brain. (Beta-amyloid plaques are the lumps that form at the nerve fibres in the brain and are considered the main culprit of Alzheimer’s disease.)

To clarify the link between intestinal flora and the occurrence of Alzheimer’s, the researchers transferred intestinal bacteria from diseased mice to germ-free healthy mice. They discovered that the mice with the unhealthy bacteria developed more beta-amyloid plaques in the brain compared to the healthy mice.

“Our study is unique as it shows a direct causal link between gut bacteria and Alzheimer’s disease. It was striking that the mice which completely lacked bacteria developed much less plaque in the brain,” says researcher Frida Fåk Hållenius, at the Food for Health Science Centre.

The important thing to note here, though, is that the bacteria found in the “Alzheimer’s” mice was abnormal. It was not the healthy bacteria crucial to healthy immunity and digestion in the human body.

Other recent studies are pointing to possible links between Alzheimer’s disease and infections. As reported by Gina Kolata in the New York Times (May 25, 2016), Harvard researchers  reported in the journal “Science Translational Medicine” this hypothesis: “that a virus, fungus or bacterium gets into the brain, passing through a membrane — the blood-brain barrier — that becomes leaky as people age. The brain’s defense system rushes in to stop the invader by making a sticky cage out of proteins, called beta amyloid. The microbe, like a fly in a spider web, becomes trapped in the cage and dies. What is left behind is the cage — a plaque that is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s.”

David Perlmutter, MD, a neurologist, author and Fellow of the American College of Nutrition, offers this interesting article about probiotics as being a possible  tool for reversing Alzheimer’s disease. http://www.drperlmutter.com/reversing-alzheimers-with-probiotics/

Researchers evaluated 60 patients with Alzheimer’s for 12 weeks. First the group went through a blood test to determine their levels of highly sensitive c-reactive protein (hs-CRP) a powerful marker of inflammation. They also took the mini-mental status exam (MMSE), the most commonly used cognitive assessment tool for memory impairment.

Half the group was given a placebo, with the other half taking a probiotic milk containing the probiotic species, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium bifidum, and Lactobacillus fermentum. The results of the study were stunning. The placebo group showed an increase in hs-CRP, an inflammation marker, by an impressive 45%. In the group taking the probiotic, hs-CRP actually declined by 18% indicating a dramatic reduction in inflammation.
Dr. Perlmutter says, “But here’s the truly exciting news. Over the 12 weeks, the patients in the placebo continued to decline mentally, as you might expect. Their MMSE score dropped from 8.47 to 8.00, a substantial reduction. But the group on the inflammation reducing probiotics actually demonstrated, not a decline in brain function, but an actual improvement, with their MMSE scores going from 8.67 up to 10.57, and that’s a huge improvement. Again, not only was their mental decline stopped in it’s tracks, these individuals regained brain function!

He continues, “The message here is that inflammation is directly determined by the health and diversity of our gut bacteria, and this has major implications in terms of brain health, function, and disease resistance. Recognizing that inflammation is the mechanism underlying not just Alzheimer’s disease, but Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and even cancer means that the findings in this report may have wide implications.”

Healing the gut. . .reducing inflammation

It seems there might be a two-pronged approach to healing the gut by reducing inflammation and restoring beneficial bacterial.

  1. Restore beneficial bacteria
  • Eat fermented foods such as yogurt, kefir, kimchi, Sauerkraut, apple cider vinegar, and Japanese foods like miso, kombucha and natto.
  • Take a daily probiotic such as Garden of Life’s Raw Probiotics Colon Care or MegaFloria Probiotics, or check out the reviewed probiotic supplements at The Best Probiotic Supplement site.
  • Take L-glutamine, an amino acid, which is essential to a healthy immune and digestive system, heals leaky gut and reduces sugar cravings.

2. To reduce inflammation

Reduce consumption of foods that are known to cause inflammation

  • sugary drinks and desserts
  • white flour products
  • fried foods
  • artificial sweeteners and additives
  • vegetables oils such as canola, sunflower, soy, corn, safflower or palm oil which have a high concentration of the inflammatory fat omega 6 and are low in the anti-inflammatory fat omega-3. Instead, use olive, avocado, walnut and coconut oils.
  • saturated fats
  • meat—reduce your consumption and try to eat only grass-fed beef and chicken that is free-range
  • alcohol

 

It also helps to reduce your stress, get a good nights’ sleep, drink plenty of water, and exercise!

 

How lack of sleep can lead to osteoporosis . . . and what to do about it.

Radiography

May is Osteoporosis Awareness Month, and just when we thought we didn’t need one more thing to worry about, The Endocrine Society has published a new study linking prolonged sleep disturbance with bone loss in men.

The study researchers found that healthy men had reduced levels of a marker of bone formation in their blood after just three weeks of restricted sleep and circadian disruption similar to that seen in jet lag or night shift work. A biological marker of bone resorption, or breakdown, was unchanged.

“This altered bone balance creates a potential bone loss window that could lead to osteoporosis and bone fractures,” said lead investigator Christine Swanson, M.D., an assistant professor at the University of Colorado in Aurora, Colorado.

“If chronic sleep disturbance is identified as a new risk factor for osteoporosis, it could help explain why there is no clear cause for osteoporosis in the approximately 50 percent of the estimated 54 million Americans with low bone mass or osteoporosis,” Swanson said.

Inadequate sleep is also prevalent, affecting more than 25 percent of the U.S. population occasionally and 10 percent frequently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report.

The 10 men in this study were part of a larger study that some of Swanson’s co-authors conducted in 2012 at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Mass. That study evaluated health consequences of sleep restriction combined with circadian disruption. Swanson defined circadian disruption as “a mismatch between your internal body clock and the environment caused by living on a shorter or longer day than 24 hours.”

Study subjects stayed in a lab, where for three weeks they went to sleep each day four hours later than the prior day, resulting in a 28-hour “day.” Swanson likened this change to “flying four time zones west every day for three weeks.” The men were allowed to sleep only 5.6 hours per 24-hour period, since short sleep is also common for night and shift workers. While awake, the men ate the same amounts of calories and nutrients throughout the study. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and again after the three weeks of sleep manipulation for measurement of bone biomarkers. Six of the men were ages 20 to 27, and the other four were ages 55 to 65. Limited funding prevented the examination of serum from the women in this study initially, but the group plans to investigate sex differences in the sleep-bone relationship in subsequent studies.

After three weeks, all men had significantly reduced levels of a bone formation marker called P1NP compared with baseline, the researchers reported. This decline was greater for the younger men than the older men: a 27 percent versus 18 percent decrease. She added that levels of the bone resorption marker CTX remained unchanged, an indication that old bone could break down without new bone being formed.

“These data suggest that sleep disruption may be most detrimental to bone metabolism earlier in life, when bone growth and accrual are crucial for long-term skeletal health,” she said. “Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and to explore if there are differences in women.”

What to do about it?

The first line of defense is to improve sleep hygiene. Find more ways to get a good night’s sleep in my book “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia,” (Blue River Press) available wherever books are sold.cropped-front-cover-42316.jpg

  1. Exercise early, not in the last two hours before going to bed. Regular exercise has been shown to help people fall asleep faster and benefit from deeper and more restful sleep.
  2. Alleviate the stress and fatigue of the day with safe, proven herbs such as passion flower, magnolia, and valerian, and amino acids taurine, theanine and GABA, and melatonin which have been scientifically shown to produce a gentle calming effect on the whole physiology.
  3. Get thyself outside! Researchers found that bright light in the early morning and avoidance of light in the evening promotes a healthy circadian rhythm, whereas bright light in the evening disrupts the sleep cycle. And make sure you sleep with the lights off in you room.
  4. People with stressful lives often take their stress into bed with them and are unable to turn off the mental chatter. Eat dinner earlier, and don’t watch an exciting or scary movie before bed (that goes for reading matter as well), and certainly do not smoke, or drink alcohol or caffeine in the evening.
  5. Go to bed earlier. Research shows that the hours of sleep before 2 a.m. are more rejuvenating than all the hours after.
  6. Take a warm bath with soothing lavender oil to help you unwind.
  7. Establish a regular bedtime, but don’t go to bed if you feel wide awake.
  8. Once in bed, use creative imagery and relaxation techniques to pacify your mind.
  9. Avoid staying in bed for long periods of time while awake, or going to bed because of boredom.
  10. Take your TV or computer out of your bedroom. If not, your brain becomes used to the stimulation and starts to expect it when you are there. This makes it harder for you to fall asleep.
  11. A snack before bedtime helps many people. Foods such as warm milk, turkey, tuna, nuts, banana, grapefruit, dates and figs are high in the amino acid L-tryptophan, which promotes the production of serotonin, a natural relaxant. Avoid eating heavy meals at least two hours prior to going to sleep.
  12. Sex can be a natural sleep inducer for some people.
  13. Avoid emotional upset or stressful situations prior to bedtime.
  14. Relax with an inspirational book, soft music, and a cup of herbal tea.
  15. Talk with your health care provider if you’ve tried the above and are still having difficulty falling asleep, awaken several times throughout the night, have early morning awakenings or have marked difficulty getting out to bed in the morning.
  16. Good night, sleep tight.

A popular prostate cancer treatment puts men at risk for Alzheimer’s & dementia

Man thinking.

I know several men with prostate cancer. In fact, one of them is on his death-bed. But don’t worry. It’s a slow-growing cancer, and it’s possible to live with it for a long time. It’s also possible to avoid. (see below) But first, here are some things you should know

The American Cancer Society predicts that 220,800 new cases of prostate cancer would be diagnosed in 2015. An estimated 27,640 men will die of it. African-American men are more likely to get prostate cancer and have the highest death rate. Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men. In other parts of the world — notably Asia, Africa, and Latin America — prostate cancer is rare.

If you are a man over 50 years old and don’t already suffer from prostate problems, the odds are 2 to 1 that you will before you turn 59.

Almost all men experience the symptoms of prostate enlargement and some form of prostate-induced discomfort during their lifetime, and especially after the age 50. These include frequent and urgent urination, urination through the night, a weak stream or one that is difficult to start or stop, and reduced sexual libido. The symptoms typically appear with the beginnings of hair loss and eventual baldness. The cause is an imbalance of sex hormones.

The connection between dementia and ADT therapy

A new study at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found there is a connection between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) — a testosterone-lowering therapy for prostate cancer– and dementia.

Their previous studies have shown men who undergo ADT may be at an increased risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, compared to men who were not treated with the therapy. This new analysis — the largest of its kind ever performed on this topic — shows that all existing studies taken together support the link to dementia and show a possible link to Alzheimer’s.

This is not good news. The common side effects of ADT are hot flashes and enlarged breasts, which are definitely annoying but symptoms you can live with. Dementia and Alzheimer’s are another story.

Other treatments for prostate cancer include surgery, radiation, and brachytherapy, a type of internal radiation that plants radioactive “seeds” in the prostate. But these treatments also carry risk of side effects including urine leakage, poor sexual function, and bowel problems. It’s important to speak with your doctor to determine which treatment is best for you and what side effects you are willing to live with.

Prevention is the key

  • b-Sitosterol is one of a group of phytosterols that promote prostrate and male uro-genital health. b-sitosterol and other phytosterols support male urinary and prostate health by inhibiting the uptake of cholesterol into the blood. This redirects the conversion of cholesterol into the steroids from which the sex hormones are made. As hundreds of scientific studies have demonstrated, the cells of the prostate respond to these rejuvenated hormones and de-proliferate, reducing the size of the prostate and the symptoms
  • Boron is found in red wine, raisins, peanuts, apples, pears, peaches, oranges, grapes, lima beans, and peanut butter. Studies have shown that men with the highest boron intake were 65 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer than men with the lower boron intake. Researcher found that boron’s cancer-fighting effects seem to be specific for prostate cancer, so make sure you eat your daily dose of apples and oranges.
  • If you like tomato sauce, you’re in luck. Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant found in red fruits and vegetables, especially tomatoes, watermelon, red grapefruit, and guava. Researchers have linked the frequent use of lycopene from tomatoes to a lower risk of prostate and other cancers. Interestingly, Lycopene is best assimilated and absorbed after eating tomatoes cooked in olive oil.
  • Selenium intake has been directly associated with lower risk of prostate cancer. In a Harvard School of Public Health study, men who received at least 200 micrograms of selenium in a daily nutritional supplement were one-third less likely to get prostate cancer than the men who received a placebo. Selenium is found in tuna, brazil nuts, and sunflower seeds.
  • Zinc is important for a healthy prostate gland. Since the prostate gland requires 10 times more zinc than any other gland or organ in the body, researchers believe that a zinc deficiency might contribute to BPH. Foods that are high in zinc: pumpkin seeds, oysters, beef, lamb, toasted wheat germ, spinach, squash seeds, nuts, dark chocolate, pork, chicken, beans, and mushrooms. Play it safe and take a zinc nutritional supplement. Make sure it contains some copper, which optimizes absorption.

What does the prostate gland do?

The prostate is the size and shape of a walnut and is located under the bladder and directly in front of the rectum. It secretes a thick, whitish fluid that provides about half the fluid in semen, and helps transport sperm.

What causes prostate problems?

After about age 40, the prostate begins to grow in just about every male because DHT (dihydrotestosterone), a potent form of the male hormone testosterone, isn’t excreted efficiently. DHT then accumulates in the prostate, causing prostate cells to rapidly reproduce. Sometimes the enlargement is a sign of cancer. But usually the result is a condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia. Most doctors refer to enlarged prostate simply as BPH.

As BPH develops, the prostate may press against the neck of the bladder or urethra, squeezing the pipe shut, like stepping on a garden hose. This pressure can make it difficult to urinate and may result in a variety of symptoms:

  • Urgency—the need to go immediately
  • During urination, there is a thin stream of urine that stops and starts instead of a full, steady stream
  • Hesitancy or difficulty starting urine flow
  • Dribbling after urinating
  • Nocturia — having to get up frequently at night to urinate
  • Increased frequency of urination
  • Increased risk of infection if the bladder does not empty entirely and urine is retained

Unlike BPH, prostate cancer may not give symptoms in its early, curable stage. This is why every year start in your 40s it’s important to get a PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) test, in which the blood is analyzed for evidence of cancer.


Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Boulder Book Store, Tattered Cover Book Store, Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.