A Vegetarian Holiday Feast

Homemade apple pie with nuts and pumpkin seeds.I’ve been a vegetarian since 1971—my entire adult life. I’ve never had a problem eating Thanksgiving dinner. I just avoid the turkey and make a veggie dish containing protein. The benefit is that, although tryptophan—the essential amino acid in turkey—won’t be surging through my body to promote serotonin, the feel-good neurotransmitter—I will be getting more antioxidants and fiber than most people enjoying the holiday feast.

Whether you eat turkey or not, are a vegetarian or not, here are some great veggie dishes worth trying. I’ve listed them in order from appetizer, salad, muffins, entree, side dishes, and dessert to make a complete vegetarian Thanksgiving/holiday feast.

These two appetizer recipes are a throwback to the 70s. They are still delicious! Serve before your feast, while you are busy in the kitchen with final preparations. All recipes are gluten-free except for the pumpernickel dip, which can be made gluten-free if the dip is put into a bowl or gluten-free hollowed out bread.

Appetizers

Artichoke Dip

  • 1 can artichokes, drained and cut into small pieces.
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder

Directions

  1. Blend all ingredients together.
  2. Sprinkle paprika on top. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes.
  3. Serve with crackers, veggies, etc.

Pumpernickel dip

  • 3 cups sour cream (1 large container) or plain Greek yogurt
  • 3 cups mayonnaise
  • 4 tsps dried dill weed
  • 1 tsp. salt (or to taste)
  • 1 tsp. celery seed
  • 4 Tbs. dried onion flakes
  • 4 Tbs dried parsley flakes

Directions

  1. Blend together and refrigerate overnight or for several hours so flavors blend.
  2. Scoop out the center of a round pumpernickel or sour dough bread. Fill with the dip.
  3. Serve with raw veggies that can be dipped into the bread.

Salad

Green salad with “cutie” mandarin oranges—serves 4-6

  • 1 or 2 heads of Butterhead lettuce
  • 3 mandarin sectioned oranges or 1 can of mandarin oranges, drained
  • 1/2 cup slivered almonds
  • 2 Tbs sugar
  • 1 cup celery, diced
  • sliced red onion (optional)

Dressing

  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/8 tsp red pepper flakes

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, combine the lettuce, oranges, and sliced onions.
  2. Heat sugar and almonds in a pan over medium heat until sugar melts and coats almonds; stir and heat until almonds are slightly brown.
  3. Turn onto plate and cool for 10 minutes.
  4. Combine remaining ingredients in a jar with a tight fitting lid; shake vigorously.
  5. Pour salad dressing over lettuce mixture; toss.
  6. Sprinkle with sugared almonds.

Muffins

Gluten-free Flax Meal Muffins

  •  ¾ cup brown rice flour
  • ¾ cup buckwheat flour
  • ½ cup ground flaxseed
  • ½ cup date sugar (or sweetener of your choice)
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ½ cup raisins
  • 2 eggs
  • ¼ cup oil of your choice (coconut, avocado, etc.)
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 cup buttermilk or coconut milk

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375º. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with unbleached paper liners and set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together brown rice flour, buckwheat flour, flaxseed, sweetener, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt and raisins.
  3. In a second large bowl, whisk together eggs, oil, applesauce and buttermilk. Add flour mixture to buttermilk mixture and stir until just combined.
  4. Spoon batter into prepared muffin tins and bake until golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean, about 30 minutes.
  5. Cool muffins in pan for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to finish cooling.

Entree

Kale Slab Pie (adapted from a recipe by Arthi Subramaniam)  serves 12

  • 3 bunches of kale—tear the leaves off the stems, or 2 pounds of Swiss chard
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 2 medium onions, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch scallion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh dill
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste (divided)
  • 3 cups water
  • 2 cups coarsely ground cornmeal (polenta style)
  • 1 cup feta cheese, crumbled
  • 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1 cup pomegranate seeds for garnish

Directions

  1. Blanch kale leaves in salted boiled water for about 4 minutes. Transfer wilted greens to a bowl of cold water. Drain and squeeze out moisture. Chop and set aside.
  2. Heat 4 Tbs of olive oil over medium heat in a skillet, add onion. Cook, stirring until tender, about 8 minutes.
  3. Add scallions and cook for another 2 minutes. Stir in kale, dill and mint. Add red pepper flakes, and salt and pepper to taste, and combine well. (I don’t add salt because I think there’s another salt in the cheese.) Remove from heat and let kale mixture cool.
  4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and grease a 13-by-9pinch rectangular pan with remaining oil (1 Tbs plus 1 tsp.)
  5. In a medium saucepan, bring water to a boil. Gently and slowly add polenta and 1-2 tsp. of salt. Stir continuously so it doesn’t lump until thick. Spread in the pan, like a crust.
  6. Add feta and mozzarella cheese to kale mixture; lightly combine well. Spread evenly over the polenta crust. Cover the dish with foil, loosely, and bake 30 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 15-20 minutes, until top is slightly brown. Remove from oven and allow to sit for 30 minutes. Garnish with the pomegranate seeds. Allow the slab pie to “rest” for about 30 minutes before serving.

Veggie side dish

Roasted Cauliflower  serves 6

  • 2 heads cauliflower cut into florets
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 2 Tbs pine nuts
  • 1/2 cup raisins soaked in hot water

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  • In a large bowl, toss cauliflower, 1/4 cup olive oil, curry powder, salt and pepper. Spread onto a pan and roast for 10 minutes. Toss and then roast another 10 minutes until slightly golden, about 2 minutes.
  • Toast the pine nuts in a toaster oven, making sure to keep an eye on them so they don’t burn. Drain the raisins. Toss the cauliflower with the pine nuts and cauliflower.

Side dish

Butternut Squash Risotto serves 4

  • 1 butternut squash baked and scooped
  • 2 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 6 cup of vegetable stock or water
  • 6 Tbs unsalted butter
  • 2 large shallots, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups of Arborio rice
  • 1/2 cup of white wine
  • 1 tsp saffron threads
  • 1 cup of grated parmesan
  • Heat oven to 450 degrees. Peel squash and cut into cubes, discarding stringy center and seeds. Toss with olive oil and salt and pepper. Place on baking sheet and roast 30 minutes. Set aside.

Directions

  1. Heat stock and simmer.
  2. In a large pot, melt butter and add shallots for 10 minutes. Add rice and coat with butter.
  3. Add wine and cook 2 minutes.
  4. Add 2 full ladles of stock to rice plus saffron, 1 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp pepper. Stir and simmer until stock is absorbed. Continue to add stock until almost all is used, cooking about 30 minutes.
  5. Turn off heat and add squash and Parmesan cheese.

For dessert enjoy apple pie, pumpkin pie or simple baked apples with ice cream.

Baked apples

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds apples peeled, cored, sliced (Honeycrisp, Gala, or Granny Smith, or a mixture of 2 or all 3)
  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • lemon juice from 1/2 a lemon
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

 

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Peel the apples, cut and remove the core and cut into slices about 1/3-1/2 an inch thick.
  3. Put the apples to a large bowl and add the light brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, salt, lemon juice and vanilla extract. Stir to combine. Spoon the apples into a 2 quart baking dish.
  4. Cut the butter into small squares, and place over the apples.
  5. Bake for 30 minutes, stirring after the apples have baked for 15 minutes. This prevents apples on the top from drying. Bake until the apples are tender and soft.
  6. Remove and serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top. Serve warm.

Have a safe and wonderful Thanksgiving!

image

Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and online at Target and Walmart, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Keep your cool with these 10 summertime eating tips

Colorful smoothies in bottles, detox summer diet fresh drink for breakfast or snack.It’s summertime and the livin’ is easy—or at least we’d like it to be. This summer is especially hot all over the world. If you’re tired and stressed out from caregiving, these tips will help you stay cooler in summer. The same information applies to those we care for. . . and for everyone.

According to the ancient Indian system of Ayurveda our body consists of three main elements or doshas—Vatta, Pitta and Kapha. Pitta consists of water and fire. It’s hot, so during summer when the temperature rises we want to eat cooling foods. Eating cooling foods not only keeps us from overheating, it reduces the tendency to get irritable, impatient and angry.  (Chapters 20 and 31 in “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey through Alzheimer’s and Dementia” contain more information about ayurveda and nutrition that calms down the nervous system and supports immunity.)

  1. First and foremost, stay hydrated. It’s especially important to make sure you and your loved ones are getting enough liquids because when we forget to drink we can become dehydrated quickly, which leads to other health problems. It’s also crucial to keep the brain hydrated in order to maintain mental alertness. Drink plenty of water and stay away from carbonated and caffeinated drinks. Herbal teas, and fresh fruit or vegetable juices are great in summer. Just remember that fruit juices are high in sugar and calories. Coconut water is cooling and helps to replenish electrolytes, which is especially important during and after an illness.
  2. Enjoy the bounty of summer fruits. Peaches, apricots, cherries, watermelon, cantaloupe, and berries are especially good for helping the body reduce the fiery heat of summer. Juice them or make popsicles with watermelon juice or any other combination including yogurt. These are especially helpful to keep seniors hydrated and for people who have trouble chewing.
  3. According to Ayurveda, some of the recommended summer vegetables include cucumber, green leafy vegetables, green beans, squash, zucchini, asparagus, beets and eggplant. Juice a leafy green with cucumber and beets for a delicious cooling drink.
  4. Sprinkle on the herbs and spices. They’re easy to use and contribute added flavor and antioxidants to your diet. Cooling spices include cardamom, coriander, fennel and tumeric. Cooling herbs include cilantro, mint and dill.
  5. Avoid hot, sour and salty foods including fermented food, red meat, and greasy and spicy food. Excess pitta aggravates the tendency towards heartburn and gastric hyperacidity.
  6. Here’s some good news—Ayurveda recommends ice cream during the hot summer months! So by all means, enjoy! Dementia patients are especially fond of ice cream. If the person you are caring for refuses to eat or eats very little, try serving ice cream. It contains protein, calcium and calories, and it’s easy to serve and eat. If weight gain or cholesterol is a concern, select a dairy-free version of America’s favorite dessert. Rice Cream, Coconut Bliss and Soy Delicious make delicious non-dairy, frozen desserts.
  7. Cooling grains include amaranth, barley, quinoa, rice, tapioca and wheat. Use them in salads mixed with veggies. One of my favorites is quinoa salad. Cook 1 cup of quinoa. (Be sure to rinse it first to remove saponin, a naturally occurring chemical that coats each grain to ward off insects. It has a strong, bitter flavor. And yes, it is a pain to rinse quinoa. First soak it and then place it in a very fine mesh strainer and rinse.)  Sauté onion and zucchini, add a handful of fresh corn cut off the cob, mix with the quinoa. Add fresh tomatoes, black beans, and a dressing made with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Delicious!
  8. Make your own granola. Once you do, you’ll never go back to buying store-bought granola, which is typically filled with sugar. Plus, it is expensive. Oats, almonds, and coconut are all cooling. First toast 1/2 cup of slivered almonds on a cookie sheet in the oven. Watch carefully so they don’t burn. Add to 4 cups of oats, along with 1/2 cup coconut flakes, 1/4 cup coconut oil, 1/4 cup maple syrup. Add 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, if desired. (Cinnamon is warming, but a little bit won’t hurt.) Stir and bake at 325 degrees for about 20 minutes. Add raisins if desired.
  9. For added protein, top your salads with these cooling legumes: garbanzo, pinto, white beans, azuki beans, and black-eyed peas.
  10. If you eat meat try to avoid beef, chicken, and pork during the hot months and use cooling meats such as buffalo, turkey rabbit or venison instead.

Happy eating. . . and stay cool!


image

Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Preventing Caregiver Burnout with Good Nutrition and Foods that Support Neurotransmitters

Keto diet concept - salmon, avocado, eggs, nuts and seedsWhether you want to support your brain health, relieve stress and anxiety about caregiving responsibilities, or just want to rev up your energy, stamina and immunity, here are some ways to protect your health and support your mood.

Start your day with an energizing breakfast to stabilize your blood sugar, so your mood stays even and you can perform at your best. When blood sugar is too high or low it’s a signal to the body to store calories, which adds fat around your middle. If you’re nauseous in the morning it means your blood sugar is low.

Eat within one hour upon rising and by 10am, and make sure your breakfast isn’t coffee and a doughnut. Have some protein and a healthy fat such as an omelet and avocado and a piece of whole grain or gluten-free toast. It’ll provide you with the energy you need to get through the morning while maintaining a sense of equilibrium.

Healthy Breakfast with Wholemeal Bread Toast and Poached Egg

Breakfast of Champions

  • Top a bagel or slice of whole wheat break with a fried egg, sliced tomato, avocado, slice of low-fat cheese
  • Bagel topped with hummus, tomato, goat cheese
  • Spread a tablespoon of almond butter on a piece of bread or bagel
  • Yogurt/granola parfait with fresh fruit
  • Sautéed greens (kale or spinach) and onion, and a corn tortilla topped with eggs, beans, sprinkle of cheese, salsa
  • Oatmeal or multi-grain cereal with almonds or walnuts, prunes, cinnamon, flax seed meal, Greek yogurt
  • Spinach mushroom omelet with salsa, berries and wheat toast
  • Whole-grain mini-quiche with ½ cup of berries

Hydrate!

Senior couple staying hydrated after running jogging

Our body is 50-65% water. Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated and to flush out toxins. The brain, which is 70% water, gets dehydrated just like your body. When it is dehydrated, neurotransmission—which is heavily dependent on water—is impaired, resulting in poor memory, concentration and impaired abstract thinking. The next time your mind is muddled, drink a tall glass of water and notice the difference. Choose smoothies, fresh juices, water, herbal teas.

Neurotransmitters are the brain chemicals that communicate information throughout your brain and body. The brain uses neurotransmitters to tell your heart to beat, your lungs to breathe, and your stomach to digest. They can also affect mood, sleep, concentration, weight, and can cause adverse symptoms when they are out of balance. Neurotransmitter levels can be depleted many ways. It is estimated that 86% of Americans have suboptimal neurotransmitter levels. Stress, poor diet, poor digestion, poor blood sugar control, drug (prescription and recreational), alcohol and caffeine can deplete them. (Emmons, The Chemistry of Joy, 2006).

 

list of neurotransmitters

Serotonin is necessary for a stable mood.

A deficiency can result in depression, irritability, sudden tears, insomnia, anxiety, or panic attacks, binge eating, carbohydrate craving, an overactive mind, and low tolerance to stress. When chronic stress is combined with nutrient deficiencies because of poor eating habits the risk of mood disorders can increase.

Foods that enhance serotonin: Salmon, Soy, turkey, cheese, eggs, spinach, cottage cheese, nuts, milk, avocado, meat, chocolate

Activities that enhance serotonin: cross crawl movement, as in swimming, hiking, biking

Dopamine keeps us focused and motivated. Dopamine is sometimes referred to as a “gas pedal” neurotransmitter. A deficiency can result in depressed mood, excessive sleeping, eight gain, obesity, lack of energy, addictions. When in balance, dopamine increases alertness, wakefulness, energy. It is depleted by addictions, sugar, cigarettes.

Foods that enhance dopamine: Meat, wild game, eggs, chocolate, blueberries, yoghurt, milk, soy, cheese, seeds and nuts, beans and legumes.

Activities than enhance dopamine: Deep breathing, weight bearing exercise and strength training enhance dopamine.

GABA inhibits nerve cells from firing. Too many carbs and refined foods deplete GABA. Exercise, and being outdoors, paying attention to your personal needs are important.

Passion flower, lemon balm and valerian help support GABA, especially helps you fall asleep.

How to boost your neurotransmitters

  • Focus on complex carbohydrates (whole grains, fruits and veggies) and eliminate junk foods or refined carbs.
  • Eat 3 balanced meals and 1-2 snacks/day. Include a high-quality protein with every meal
  • Unlimited amounts of fresh veggies
  • Eat a good breakfast

Do you lie awake at night?

Lack of sleep triggers the body to increase production of cortisol, the stress hormone, which makes it harder to fall asleep and stay in a deep sleep because on some level your body and brain think they need to stay alert for danger. Although insomnia isn’t considered a disease by itself, it can lead to numerous health problems. Lack of sleep may result in slower reflexes, irritability, fatigue, lack of motivation and depression. Your health, motivation, productivity, mood and energy all depend on getting quality sleep.

Foods that promote sleep

Although it’s not recommended to have a full meal close to bedtime, eating a snack helps maintain blood sugar levels, which helps promote restful sleep.

A cheese slice, or slice of turkey contain tryptophan, an essential amino acid, that promotes sleep. Other foods that might help: Whole grain crackers with nut butter, oatmeal, popcorn, almonds and walnuts. Some fruits (oranges, bananas, tart cherries, kiwis) contain melatonin.

  • Small amount of protein
  • Complex carbs
  • Nuts
  • Cottage cheese
  • Chamomile tea, warm milk
  • Fruits

Eat more healthy fats and skip the hydrogenated and trans fats found in doughnuts, potato chips and other pastries and desserts.  Omega-3 fatty acids are rich in DHA, the major unsaturated fat in the brain. This long-chain fatty acid provides the necessary fluid quality to the membranes of the nerve cells so that electrical nerve impulses can flow easily along the circuits of the brain. One study found that Alzheimer’s patients given an omega-3-rich supplement experienced a significant improvement in their quality of life. Eating fish such as wild-caught salmon, sardines and other cold-water fish can protect you against Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Numerous studies have shown that elderly people who did not have dementia had high blood levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential fatty acid found in cold-water fish, in comparison to those with dementia, who had on average 30% to 40% lower blood levels of DHA.

 Ways to increase your DHA intake: eat cold-water fish such as wild-caught salmon, sardines and mackerel, at least twice a week. Add flax meal to cereal and baked goods, sprinkle flax oil on your salad, eat a small handful of walnuts at least several times a week.

Make Healthy Choices

Choose these

  • Water, green tea, herbal teas
  • Nuts & seeds
  • Avocado, olive oil, omega-3 fatty acids
  • Fresh fruits and Veggies
  • Fish, high-quality protein
  • SOUL foods (seasonal, organic, unadulterated, local)
  • Sugar alternatives: stevia, monk fruit, coconut sugar, maple syrup, agave, birch sugar, honey

Avoid these

  • Coffee, soda, artificial sweeteners
  • Chips, cookies, pastries, candy
  • Poor quality fats (hydrogenated,
  • Processed lunch meats
  • Dairy products with rBGH (growth hormones)

Remember this

Whether you’re eating breakfast, lunch, dinner or a snack, always think protein!

Assortment of healthy protein source and body building food

Build your meal around chicken, fish, tofu, cottage cheese or eggs, and then add low-starch vegetables or fruits. The general rule is to eat 3-4 ounces of lean, dense meat or 6 ounces of fish. Women should aim for around 30 grams of protein. Men should aim for around 40 grams of protein. Another rule of thumb is to divide your plate in half. Fill half of the plate with veggies, one quart with a protein, and the other quarter with a whole grain such as quinoa, rice, barley, etc.

Happy eating!


image

Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

 

Mouth-watering recipes in celebration of International Mediterranean Diet Month!

свежая рыба с овощами на деревянном столе

The Mediterranean diet emphasizes eating a plant-based diet including: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts; replacing butter with healthy fats such as olive oil and avocado oil; using herbs and spices instead of salt; limiting red meat to no more than a few times a month, and eating fish such as salmon, halibut, sardines, and tuna at least twice a week. It is considered one of the healthiest diets in the world.

I hope you enjoy some of the following recipes. Please share your favorite Mediterranean recipe. I’d love to try it!

Enjoy!

Pour on the olive oil

Olives and avocados, and other foods rich in monounsaturated fatty acids, have a positive effect on blood glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride and insulin levels.

Olive oil is great on everything. It has been shown to help increase HDL “good” cholesterol while it lowers LDL “bad” cholesterol. Further, olive oil helps reduce cardiovascular risk and provides vitamin E, an important antioxidant.

Tomatoes are a rich source of beta-carotene and the powerful antioxidant lycopene, which has been shown to help reduce the risk of prostate cancer in numerous studies.

A 1995 Italian study researched the effects of nutrient-derived antioxidants on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation.  The study found that olive oil constituents effectively inhibit (LDL) oxidation, suggesting that the intake of such antioxidants plays a role in the lower incidence of coronary heart disease in the Mediterranean countries, where olive oil and other high-antioxidant foods are a major part of the diet.Creole Fish

One of my favorite summertime meals is Nicoise salad. Grill a salmon fillet (I like to have leftovers), and add it to a bed of salad greens. Add whatever veggies taste good to you and/or in your fridge: Cook them first: beets, green beans, potatoes, etc. Top with dressing, toasted pumpkin seeds, feta cheese, etc. The possibilities are endless.

 

Halibut or salmon 

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces of halibut or salmon fillet
  • 1 15-ounce can no-salt, organic stewed tomatoes, or 2 cups chopped fresh tomatoes
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • ½ cup chopped green pepper
  • 2 Tbs fresh basil
  • 1 tsp. fresh thyme
  • 2 Tbs fresh parsley
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 Tbs olive oil

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350
  2. Put washed fish fillet inside a baking dish that has been greased with olive oil.
  3. Sauté onion, green pepper and tomatoes in 2 Tbs. olive oil.
  4. Blend veggies with the herbs and place on top of the fish.
  5. Bake covered for 10-15 minutes, or until the fish is cooked.
  6. Season with lemon juice, and salt and pepper if desired.

Avocado  Enjoy a few slices of avocado in your tossed salad, or mix some chopped avocado into your favorite salsa.

Curried Lentils -serves 4. (from whfoods.com)

 Ingredients

  • 1 cup brown or green lentils, washed
  • 4 cups + 1 Tbs vegetable broth
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 medium cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, diced into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 2 medium celery stalks, diced into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 2 cups finely chopped kale
  • 2 tsp curry powder
  • 1 15 oz can diced tomatoes (do not drain)
  • 3 Tbs chopped fresh cilantro
  • salt and black pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Rinse lentils in strainer and sort through, removing debris.
  2. Chop onions and garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out their hidden health benefits.
  3. Heat 1 Tbs broth in medium soup pot.
  4. Sauté onion in broth over medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until translucent.
  5. Add garlic, carrots, and celery.
  6. Continue to sauté for another couple of minutes.
  7. Add curry powder and mix to bring out its flavor.
  8. Add rinsed and drained lentils, 4 cups broth and tomatoes.
  9. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium low, and simmer uncovered until lentils and vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes.
  10. Add kale and simmer for another 10 minutes.

Spinach salad with orange and walnuts —serves 4.

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces spinach, washed, trimmed and dried (1 bunch)
  • 2 navel oranges
  • 1/3 cup walnuts, coarsely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce

Dressing

  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon poppy seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Directions

  1. Mix soy sauce and walnuts and roast for 15 minutes at 350°F or until golden.
  2. Peel oranges and slice crosswise in 1/4 inch slices, and then cut in fourths.
  3. Mix spinach greens, torn into smaller pieces, oranges and walnuts.
  4. Mix salad dressing in the blender. Toss dressing and spinach mixture together and serve.

Watermelon salad with feta and mint (serves 8-10)

Ingredients

  •  1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp Balsamic vinegar
  • One-8 pound seedless watermelon, scooped into balls or cut into chunks
  • ½ pound feta cheese, crumbled (2 cups)
  • 1 small sweet onion, cut into ½ inch pieces
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped mint leaves

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, whisk the oil, lemon juice, salt, Tabasco and pepper.
  2. Add the watermelon, feta, olives and onion and toss gently with the watermelon.
  3. Garnish with the mint and serve.

Avocado and Bean Burrito—serves 2

(from The Ultra-Metabolism Cookbook by Mark Hyman, M.D.Great for a delicious, quick lunch.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups shredded romaine lettuce
  • 2 Tbs. yellow onion, chopped
  • ½ medium avocado, peeled, pitted and chopped
  • 2 Tbs. chopped cilantro
  • 4 Tbs. chunky tomato salsa
  • ½ cup nonfat refried beans
  • 2 corn tortillas

Directions

  1. Mix the lettuce, onion, avocado, cilantro and salsa in a medium bowl until the vegetables are evenly coated.
  2. Smear half of the beans on each tortilla, fill with veggie mixture, and wrap burrito style.

Italian pesto—Use on broiled chicken, fish, pasta or bread

Ingredients

  • 1 large bunch basil, finely chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese (optional)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil

Directions

  1. Place basil, garlic, pine nuts and Parmesan cheese in a blender or food processor.
  2. Blend until thoroughly chopped and mixed.
  3. Continue processing while gradually adding olive and flax oils.
  4. Blend until smooth. Use within two days. Makes about 1 cup.

Three-Bean Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cooked kidney beans
  • 1 cup cooked garbanzos
  • 1 cup cooked, cooled green beans
  • ¾ cup lemon and oil dressing (recipe follows)
  • ¼ cup chopped celery
  • ½ cup chopped green pepper
  • ½ cup chopped red pepper
  • 1 Tbs. chopped parsley or cilantro

Directions

  1. Toss all the ingredients together.
  2. Marinate in the refrigerator, stirring occasionally to coat the beans. Makes 3 cups.

Lemon and oil dressing (basic dressing and marinade)

  • 2 Tbs lemon juice
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ¼ to ½ tsp salt
  • fresh pepper

Mix the ingredients together. Makes 1/3 cup.

Hummus

Hummus (pronounced hum´-es) is a dip/spread that is made from chickpeas, which are considered one of the oldest foods, dating back to ancient Egypt, Greece and Italy.Today, hummus is one of the most popular foods to emerge from the Mediterranean and Middle East region.

In addition to pureed chickpeas, hummus is an exotic blend of sesame tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, and spices including garlic, the most important. You can experiment and add others such as roasted red peppers, scallion and dill. Hummus is traditionally served with pita bread, crackers or fresh cut veggies. It can also be used as a spread on sandwiches. Hummus contains no saturated fat or cholesterol and is high in protein and fiber.

Ingredients:

  • 1 16 oz can of organic chickpeas or garbanzo beans
  • 1/4-cup liquid from can of chickpeas
  • juice of one or two lemons – to taste
  • 1/4 cup—1/2-cup tahini
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/4—1/2-teaspoon salt – to taste
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons parsley or chives
  • paprika—gives it color and doesn’t take away from taste

Directions

  1. Drain chickpeas and set aside liquid from can.
  2. Rinse the beans and combine with rest of ingredients in blender or food processor.
  3. Add 1/4 cup of liquid from chickpeas.
  4. Blend for 3-5 minutes on low until thoroughly mixed and smooth.
  5. Place in serving bowl or dish, and create a shallow well in the center of the hummus.
  6. Add a small amount (1-2 tablespoons) of olive oil in the well. Garnish with parsley and paprika.
  7. Serve with pita bread, crackers, and/or carrot and celery sticks, red peppers, or whatever you like.

Ricotta, feta and spinach spread (4 servings)

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ricotta cheese
  • ¼ pound feta
  • 1 cup spinach (frozen is ok)
  • ¼ cup walnuts, chopped
  • 1 Tbs. olive oil
  • ½ cup onion, sautéed in olive oil
  • 1 Tbs. rosemary
  • ¼ tsp. black pepper.

Directions

Blend together and eat with raw veggies or healthy crackers

Healthy snacks

  • Hummus and/or Baba Ganoosh with celery and carrot sticks, Bell pepper slices, or any other veggies that appeal to you.
  • Turkey slices wrapped around raw veggies (Buy roasted turkey slices, available at most deli counters, as opposed to turkey preserved with nitrates.)
  • Avocados contain healthy fats. Eat ¼ to ½ an avocado by scooping out with a spoon, or mash it up, add your favorite herbs/spices, and use as a dip for veggies or healthy chips.
  • Sliced apple with almond butter, peanut butter, or tahini
  • Hard boiled eggs or deviled eggs
  • Small handful of nuts—almonds, cashews, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, with an apple
  • Whole milk yoghurt and fruit
  • Bean tacos or tortillas, stuffed with tomatoes, greens, avocado, shredded carrots, Bell pepper, salsa
  • Chicken drumsticks
  • A scoop of tuna salad topped with sunflower seeds, chopped tomato, celery, fresh basil
  • ½ cup of whole milk cottage cheese with berries, or fruit of your choice, or ½ chopped raw veggies
  • Bake a sweet potato or yam the night before. Cut in half and top with 1 Tbs. cashews, almonds or pumpkin seeds, ¼ cup whole milk yoghurt or coconut milk yoghurt, cinnamon

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Mushrooms may reduce risk of mild cognitive impairment by 50%

Mushrooms - morchella mushrooms, boletus mushrooms, oyster mushrooms, on white background.If  you eat golden, oyster, shiitake and/or white button mushrooms, as well as dried and canned mushrooms, you’re in luck! A team from the Department of Psychological Medicine and Department of Biochemistry at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that seniors who consume more than one and one-half cups of mushrooms weekly may reduce their odds of having mild cognitive impairment (MCI) by 50%. 

What is MCI?

Mild cognitive impairment causes cognitive changes that are serious enough to be noticed by people experiencing them or to other family and friends. The changes are not severe enough to interfere with daily activity. People with MCI that involves memory problems are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias than people without MCI. Approximately 15-20 percent of people age 65 or older have MCI.

Mushrooms might be a key to reducing MCI

The correlation between eating mushrooms and reducing risk of MCI is surprising and encouraging, according to Assistant Professor Lei Feng, who is from the NUS Department of Psychological Medicine, and the lead author of this work.

The six-year study, which was conducted from 2011 to 2017, collected data from more than 600 Chinese seniors over the age of 60 living in Singapore. The research was carried out with support from the Life Sciences Institute and the Mind Science Centre at NUS, as well as the Singapore Ministry of Health’s National Medical Research Council. The results were published online in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease on 12 March 2019.

The researchers found that the compound called ergothioneine (ET), a unique antioxidant and anti-inflammatory which humans are unable to synthesize on their own, is the key to possibly reducing MCI. Ergothioneine is found in liver, kidney, black beans, kidney bean and oat bran. But the highest levels are found in bolete and oyster mushrooms.

Other compounds contained within mushrooms may also be advantageous for decreasing the risk of cognitive decline. Certain hericenones, erinacines, scabronines and dictyophorines may promote the synthesis of nerve growth factors. Bioactive compounds in mushrooms may also protect the brain from neurodegeneration by inhibiting production of beta amyloid and phosphorylated tau, and acetylcholinesterase, the culprits of Alzheimer’s disease.

How much do you need to eat?

In the study, a portion was defined as three quarters of a cup of cooked mushrooms with an average weight of around 150 grams. Two portions would be equivalent to approximately half a plate. While the portion sizes act as a guideline, it was shown that even one small portion of mushrooms a week may still be beneficial to reduce chances of MCI.

An article in Science Daily said this: According to Robert Beelman, professor emeritus of food science and director of the Penn State Center for Plant and Mushroom Products for Health, it’s preliminary, but you can see that countries that have more ergothioneine in their diets, countries like France and Italy, also have lower incidents of neurodegenerative diseases, while people in countries like the United States, which has low amounts of ergothioneine in the diet, have a higher probability of diseases like Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s,” said Beelman. “Now, whether that’s just a correlation or causative, we don’t know. But, it’s something to look into, especially because the difference between the countries with low rates of neurodegenerative diseases is about 3 milligrams per day, which is about five button mushrooms each day.”

 

Mushroom recipes

Cooking mushrooms does not seem to significantly affect the compounds. Roasted or baked mushrooms are simple to make and delicious, and go well with most foods as a side dish or topping.

Wash and slice musthrooms. Lightly oil shallow baking pan large enough to hold mushrooms in single layer. Add mushrooms and toss with 2 to 3 tablespoons oil. Add garlic; season with salt; roastfor 20 minutes stirring on occasion; mushrooms should be browned. Season with pepper.

For baked mushrooms with parmesan, thyme and lemon simply toss with olive oil, Paremesan cheese, garlic, thyme, lemon zest and lemon juice.

For more mushroom recipes google for mushroom risotto, mushroom gravy, cream of mushroom soup, creamy mushroom pasta, mushroom and barley soup.


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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”–winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in self-help– in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Calmer Waters: Spring 2019 book signings and events

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Especially for folks in the Denver-metro area: You are warmly invited! Please drop by at a book signing to say hello, or attend the caregiver symposium or conference (or both!) for lots of great information, networking and support. Respite care is available for both events. Click on the links to find out more.

7 healing soups to help you get through the cold and flu season

fresh soup 1January is National Soup month, and it’s also the month when people get colds and flues. It’s especially important during these cold winter months to support your immune system, get plenty of sleep, and try to maintain an uplifted mood.

Winter soups can warm us, strengthen us, help heal us and protect us from getting sick.  Home-made soup contains fresh ingredients that have more antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and protein. Canned soups are typically overcooked, high in sodium, and can have additives and preservatives. A big pot of soup will last several days, saving time in the kitchen. It is also an easy-to-eat, easy-to-digest form of nutrition for patients with a chronic illness such as Alzheimer’s, and for those bed-ridden with the flu.

If you’re lucky, your grandmother or mother gave you their delicious soup recipes. Here are some of my favorites for nourishing the body and soul during the cold winter months.

Immune boosting soups

Tomato Vegetable Soup

  • 2 cans whole tomatoes (organic, chopped)
  • 2 onions (sautéed)
  • 6 cloves garlic (pressed and sautéd)
  • 1⁄2 tsp oregano (dried)
  • 1 medium winter squash (peeled and cut into chunks)
  • 1 medium rutabaga (chopped)
  • 1 bunch turnips (chopped greens and roots)
  • 1 pound zucchini (cut into chunks)

Add water to cover and simmer until done. Serve with brown rice or couscous. 

Minestrone

  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 2 medium ribs celery, chopped
  • 2 cups chopped seasonal vegetables (potatoes, yellow squash, zucchini, butternut squash, green beans or peas; whatever you have)
  • 2 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano
  • ½ teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 large can (28 ounces) diced tomatoes, with their liquid (or 2 small 15-ounce cans)
  • 4 cups (32 ounces) vegetable broth
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup whole grain orecchiette, elbow or small shell pasta
  • 1 can (15 ounces) Great Northern beans, cannellini beans, or kidney beans rinsed and drained, or 1 ½ cups cooked beans
  • 2 cups baby spinach or 2 cups chopped and carefully washed spinach.
  • Freshly grated Parmesan cheese, for garnishing (optional)

 Heat the oil in a large pot and add the onion, carrots and celery. When the onion is translucent add the chopped seasonal vegetables, garlic, oregano and thyme and cook for about 2 minutes. Next, add the broth, water, salt, bay leaf, pepper flakes, and pepper. Bring to a boil and then lower to simmer and cook for about 15 minutes. Add the beans, cook for an additional 10 minutes. Add the spinach and cook until wilted. Ladle cooked pasta into each bowl and add the soup on top. Do not cook the pasta in the soup because it will eventually turn to mush. Garnish with Parmesan cheese.

Miso Stew

  • 5 cups water
  • 1/2 cup dried quinoa, rinsed
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp-sized chunk minced ginger
  • 2 stalks chopped celery
  • 2 carrots chopped
  • 1 cup chopped kale
  • 1/4 cup torn pieces combo/arame/nori seaweed (your choice)
  • 2 eggs (optional)
  • 1/4 cup organic red or white miso
  • 3 tsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne

Saute onion until soft in 2 tsp of the sesame oil. Add garlic and cook for a few minutes. Bring water, quinoa and carrots to a boil.  Reduce  to medium and add onion, garlic, ginger, celery and seaweed (if it’s a firm variety). Cook for five minutes. Crack eggs into pot and stir gently. When egg is mostly cooked, remove from heat and add kale and any tender seaweed. In a separate bowl mix miso, the remaining sesame oil, turmeric and cayenne. Add a large spoonful of broth (not boiling) and stir until smooth. When pot of soup has cooled enough to touch, add in miso mixture and serve hot. This soup can be reheated but do not boil the miso because this will kill the beneficial enzymes.

Chicken soup (Jewish penicillin)

  • 1 large whole chicken
  • 4 carrots chopped
  • 3 stalks celery chopped
  • 2 medium parsnips chopped
  • 2 medium rutabagas
  • 1 large onion chopped
  • small bunch of fresh dill
  • 2 Tbs salt, or salt to taste

Wash the chicken inside and out, remove any feathers and place in a large pot. Cover the chicken with water. Bring the liquid to a boil, lower the heat, and for the next several minutes, remove any scum that rises to the surface. Add the vegetables and salt.

Cover the pan partially and simmer the soup for 2-1/2 hours or until the chicken meat is very soft when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife. Pour the soup through a strainer or colander into a large bowl or a second pot. Set the chicken and vegetables aside. Remove the fat from the surface of the liquid with a spoon or fat-skimming tool.

For best results, refrigerate the strained soup; when it is cold, the fat will rise to the surface and harden and you can scoop it off. (Refrigerate the vegetables and the chicken separately.) Serve the soup plain or with the vegetables and boned, cut-up chicken.

Ward off the negative effects of stress

Mineral Broth

This broth helps to alkalize the body and warm the system. It also helps counter the negative effects of stress. Have it as a bowl of soup, or sip it throughout the day.

Wash with a scrub brush and cut into 1-inch chunks:

  • 1 medium potato (any variety, raw with skin)
  • 1 cup zucchini
  • 1 cup cabbage
  • 1 cup green beans
  • 2 cups celery cut into strips:
  • 1 cup kale or collard greens
  • 1 cup onion 

Coarsely chop:

  • a small bunch of dill weed
  • 1 clove garlic

Place ingredients in a large pot with a lid. Cover with  water, just to the level of the vegetables and add:

  • 6 slices fresh ginger root
  • 1/4 cup or more seaweed (dulse, nori, wakame, hiziki, kombu)
  • Seasonal greens (kale, mustard, spinach, broccoli)

Bring the water to a boil, then turn down to a simmer, and cover for three to ve hours. Strain the broth with a colander. Let cool before refrigerating or freezing. Will keep in fridge for five to seven days or in the freezer for four months.

Variations:

  • Add cubed sweet potato to soup mix in the beginning of cooking time.
  • Add 1⁄2 tsp. curry 10 minutes before serving for a zesty flavor.

Alleviate joint and inflammation

Bone broth

  • 6 pounds of any kind of bones (beef, chicken, etc.)
  • 3 cups of your favorite vegetables, chopped (carrots, celery, onion, potatoes, etc.)
  • 1 bunch flat parsley
  • 1 bunch fresh thyme
  • 1 head garlic, halved crosswise
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • 1 Tbs vinegar*
  • pepper and salt to taste

Rinse the bones in a large pot with cold water. Drain the water and place the bones back in the pot. Cover with at least 4 inches of cold water and cook over medium-high heat for about 45 minutes until the liquid boils. Reduce heat to medium.

Simmer until broth looks clear, about 1 hour. Skim the fat off occasionally using a ladle. Add the rest of the ingredients and simmer for 2 hours. Skim off fat and discard bits of meat. Then pour the broth through a fine-mesh strainer. Discard the solids. Cool before storing. This broth can be sipped throughout the day. It will keep in the refrigerator for 3 days. It can also be frozen in BPA-free bags, glass jars and BPA-free plastic containers.

* You must add some vinegar to the pot of soup in order to force the calcium in the bones to dissolve from the bones into the soup juice. Just 1 pint of soup can give you as much as 1,000 milligrams of calcium.

Ayurvedic healing soup

This traditional soup is wonderful during times of stress, stomach upset, and any time the appetite is diminished due to sickness or stress.

Kicheree

  • 4 Tbs organic Basmati rice
  • 4 Tbs mung dal or red lentils
  • 4 1/2 cups water (more or less, depending on whether you like it soupy or thick)
  • 2 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • 2 Tbs fresh lemon juice
  • 1 cup assorted veggies cut bite-sized (zucchini, yam, carrot, cauliflower, broccoli, etc.)
  • 1 tsp ground coriander seed
  • 1 tsp ground cumin seed
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • salt and pepper to taste

Combine the rice, dal ginger, veggies and water in pot. Add the spices. Bring to a boil over medium heat; then lower to a simmer for 45-50 minutes. Add water if it gets too thick. Remove from the stove. Add the lemon juice, salt and pepper.

Enjoy!


For more great information about how you can reduce stress, feel happier, more energetic, healthier, deal with issues of grief and depression, and ultimately experience inner peace, read Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s and Dementia.   Available on Amazon and at all bookstores that sell quality books.

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Caring for yourself and others with good nutrition

Mary Collette Rogers interviewed me on her podcast “The Healthy Kitchen Companion.”

Find out more about Mary’s programs around The New Kitchen Way: cookhappylivehealthy.org/blog/

Discover insights and tools for handling the challenges of caregiving, particularly stress. Sobering statistics highlight the need for addressing this topic: In 2017, fully 16 million friends and family provided 18 billion hours of unpaid care for 5½ million Americans with Alzheimer’s. That figure, of course, accounts for just one of many chronic conditions that required the services of caregivers.

Equally important is the need for self-care since it is said that at some point you’ll either be a caregiver or be cared for yourself. Self-care can minimize the need for care from others, or make it possible to provide care to those you love.

In this conversation, Barbra Cohn and Mary Collette Rogers share a wealth of knowledge and strategies for using the power of good nutrition to alleviate the stress of caregiving–whether for yourself or others.

Barbra, author of Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia, provides solid nutritional advice for
** Introducing the Stress Vitamins and minerals, and foods where they can be found
** How neurotransmitters like serotonin improve mood and how to use natural mood boosters in foods to uplift mood
** Why breakfast is the most important meal of the day for caregivers and key breakfast foods
** Barbra’s secret for boosting immunity, staying hydrated and replenishing nutrients drained by stress

Mary Collette, Healthy Kitchen Companion, explores how to ensure that Barbra’s nutritional wisdom doesn’t just get parked at the kitchen door. With The New Kitchen Way, her integrated approach to meal making, you’ll see good nutrition advice actually show up on your table–deliciously and easily. Learn
** About the power of organization and why it works as well in the kitchen as the business world
** How chaos and lack of control are the true culprits that sabotage kitchen fun and success
** How organization alleviates stress when you invite it into your kitchen and meal making
** How the kitchen and meal making can be broken down into just six areas, and
** How the 6 KitchenSmart Strategies easily guide you to get those six areas under control, leaving you relieved and confident about making nourishing meals.

 

 

Keep your cool with these 10 summertime eating tips

20bb6fee-b988-4716-bd91-23dff6882655It’s summertime and the livin’ is easy—or at least we’d like it to be. This summer is especially hot all over the world. If you’re tired and stressed out from caregiving, these tips will help you stay cooler in summer. The same information applies to those we care for. . . and for everyone.

According to the ancient Indian system of Ayurveda our body consists of three main elements or doshas—Vatta, Pitta and Kapha. Pitta consists of water and fire. It’s hot, so during summer when the temperature rises we want to eat cooling foods. Eating cooling foods not only keeps us from overheating, it reduces the tendency to get irritable, impatient and angry.  (Chapters 20 and 31 in “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey through Alzheimer’s and Dementia” contain more information about ayurveda and nutrition that calms down the nervous system and supports immunity.)

  1. First and foremost, stay hydrated. It’s especially important to make sure you and your loved ones are getting enough liquids because when we forget to drink we can become dehydrated quickly, which leads to other health problems. It’s also crucial to keep the brain hydrated in order to maintain mental alertness. Drink plenty of water and stay away from carbonated and caffeinated drinks. Herbal teas, and fresh fruit or vegetable juices are great in summer. Just remember that fruit juices are high in sugar and calories. Coconut water is cooling and helps to replenish electrolytes, which is especially important during and after an illness.
  2. Enjoy the bounty of summer fruits. Peaches, apricots, cherries, watermelon, cantaloupe, and berries are especially good for helping the body reduce the fiery heat of summer. Juice them or make popsicles with watermelon juice or any other combination including yogurt. These are especially helpful to keep seniors hydrated and for people who have trouble chewing.
  3. According to Ayurveda, some of the recommended summer vegetables include cucumber, green leafy vegetables, green beans, squash, zucchini, asparagus, beets and eggplant. Juice a leafy green with cucumber and beets for a delicious cooling drink.
  4. Sprinkle on the herbs and spices. They’re easy to use and contribute added flavor and antioxidants to your diet. Cooling spices include cardamom, coriander, fennel and tumeric. Cooling herbs include cilantro, mint and dill.
  5. Avoid hot, sour and salty foods including fermented food, red meat, and greasy and spicy food. Excess pitta aggravates the tendency towards heartburn and gastric hyperacidity.
  6. Here’s some good news—Ayurveda recommends ice cream during the hot summer months! So by all means, enjoy! Dementia patients are especially fond of ice cream. If the person you are caring for refuses to eat or eats very little, try serving ice cream. It contains protein, calcium and calories, and it’s easy to serve and eat. If weight gain or cholesterol is a concern, select a dairy-free version of America’s favorite dessert. Rice Cream, Coconut Bliss and Soy Delicious make delicious non-dairy, frozen desserts.
  7. Cooling grains include amaranth, barley, quinoa, rice, tapioca and wheat. Use them in salads mixed with veggies. One of my favorites is quinoa salad. Cook 1 cup of quinoa. (Be sure to rinse it first to remove saponin, a naturally occurring chemical that coats each grain to ward off insects. It has a strong, bitter flavor. And yes, it is a pain to rinse quinoa. First soak it and then place it in a very fine mesh strainer and rinse.)  Sauté onion and zucchini, add a handful of fresh corn cut off the cob, mix with the quinoa. Add fresh tomatoes, black beans, and a dressing made with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Delicious!
  8. Make your own granola. Once you do, you’ll never go back to buying store-bought granola, which is typically filled with sugar. Plus, it is expensive. Oats, almonds, and coconut are all cooling. First toast 1/2 cup of slivered almonds on a cookie sheet in the oven. Watch carefully so they don’t burn. Add to 4 cups of oats, along with 1/2 cup coconut flakes, 1/4 cup coconut oil, 1/4 cup maple syrup. Add 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, if desired. (Cinnamon is warming, but a little bit won’t hurt.) Stir and bake at 325 degrees for about 20 minutes. Add raisins if desired.
  9. For added protein, top your salads with these cooling legumes: garbanzo, pinto, white beans, azuki beans, and black-eyed peas.
  10. If you eat meat try to avoid beef, chicken, and pork during the hot months and use cooling meats such as buffalo, turkey rabbit or venison instead.

Happy eating. . . and stay cool!

12 tips to encourage your Alzheimer’s patient to eat

Seniorin mit BetreuerinIt seems that ice cream is the favorite food of most Alzheimer’s patients. It was certainly my husband’s. Sometimes it was the only thing that he found appealing. It’s no wonder: ice cream is cold, slippery and delicious! However, there are lots of healthy frozen desserts available that are low in fat and calories that contain little or no cholesterol. Try Rice Dream®, Coconut Bliss, Soy Dream, or Halo Top. If you have a food processor, puree frozen strawberries or bananas. You won’t even miss the sugar and cream.

Getting adequate nutrition and even the sheer act of eating can be a challenge for both patients and caregivers. Here’s a list of ways to create a tranquil setting, and some easy-to-eat foods to uplift mood and support immunity for everyone.

  1. Play classical or another type of relaxing music. My husband loved to listen to Nina Simone’s jazzy voice while he ate. Whatever the preference is, play the music softly to create an inviting atmosphere. If your loved one lives in a memory care home, the other residents will probably appreciate the music, as well.
  2. Light a candle. Set the table with a table cloth and vase of flowers. Beauty, color and light always create a magical, calming effect.
  3. Aromatherapy oils including peppermint and spearmint are energizing and might stimulate appetite.
  4. Make the chair as comfortable as possible, especially if the person has a bad back. Place a cushion on the seat and back, if necessary.
  5. Use soft lighting. Replace glaring light bulbs with a warmer color light bulb, or install a dimmer.
  6. It might be hard for the person to differentiate foods on a plate, especially if they are the same color. Use contrasting colors. For example, serve beets and carrots on white instead of white mashed potatoes on a white plate.
  7. If your patient has trouble using a fork and knife, serve finger foods. Sandwiches cut in quarters or even eighths, pieces of fruit rather than whole fruits, baked potatoes cut into chunks, etc. are easier to manage.
  8. Use herbs and spices to flavor foods instead of salt. Herbs and spices have healing benefits. For instance, basil can relieve gas and soothe stomach upsets. Cinnamon has a tranquilizing effect that helps reduce anxiety and stress. It also helps regulate blood sugar. Dill soothes the digestive tract and reduces heartburn. Mint promotes digestion and boosts mental alertness.
  9. Puree soups such as split pea, potato/leek. cauliflower, and vegetable, and serve with a wide straw, if necessary. This relieves the chore of chewing and helps hydrate as well as nourish the patient.

One of my all-time favorite recipes is for Indian kicheree, also called a “meal in a pot.”

This traditional soup is wonderful during times of stress, stomach upset, and any time the appetite is diminished due to sickness or stress.

Kicheree

4 Tbs organic Basmati rice

4 Tbs mung dal or red lentils

4 1/2 cups water (more or less, depending on whether you like it soupy or thick)

2 tsp grated fresh ginger

2 Tbs fresh lemon juice

1 cup assorted veggies cut bite-sized (zucchini, yam, carrot, cauliflower, broccoli, etc.)

1 tsp ground coriander seed

1 tsp ground cumin seed

1/4 tsp turmeric

salt and pepper to taste

Combine the rice, dal ginger, veggies and water in pot. Add the spices. Bring to a boil over medium heat; then lower to a simmer for 45-50 minutes. Add water if it gets too thick. Remove from the stove. Add the lemon juice, salt and pepper.

10. Protein shakes are nutritious, filling, and nourishing. Use ingredients of your choice without relying on the sugary nutrition drinks that are generously handed out in institutions. Bananas, strawberries, blueberries, kale, spinach, peanut butter, coconut milk, almond milk, hemp milk, soy milk, and cow’s milk are some of the popular ingredients to try. Protein powders are concentrated sources of protein from animal or plant foods, such as dairy, eggs, rice or peas. The most popular include whey, casein, egg, pea, hemp, brown rice, and mixed plant proteins.

11. Offer healthy snacks throughout the day such as cheese and apple slices, nut butter on apples slices, fresh fruit, humus and carrot sticks.

12. Eggs are my favorite “go to” food for protein. They are easy to eat, can be made in a variety of ways and contain 13 essential vitamins and minerals! Vitamin D for bone health and immune function, lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidants important for reducing the risk of cataracts and macular degeneration, vitamins B 12 and B6, thiamin, riboflavin, folate, choline, vitamin E, vitamin A, iron, zinc and more. Add pureed veggies for extra vitamins and minerals. Devil eggs are always a hit as a delicious and highly nutritious snack.

For hundreds of other caregiving tips, read “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s and Dementia”

 

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