If you suspect that you or a loved one has Alzheimer’s, you need to read this.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. If you suspect that you or a loved one might have Alzheimer’s disease, here’s what you need to know.

After decades of not making progress with pharmaceuticals for Alzheimer’s disease, researchers are finally coming up with some promising results. There’s a brand new blood test for the disease that you can take instead of going through a series of expensive and sometimes painful tests. And there’s a brand new drug that delays cognitive decline in early stage Alzheimer’s. We still don’t have a cure, but there are a number of clinical trials that someone diagnosed with Alzheimer’s can enroll in.

Why it’s important to get diagnosed early

For a full explanation, click here to read a blog I posted August, 20202. https://barbracohn.com/blog/page/2/

Here are the bullet points:

  • Cognitive problems can be caused by a number of physical conditions.
  • Cognitive symptoms may be reversible.
  • An early diagnosis is empowering as far as estate planning, and end-of-life planning, etc.
  • An early diagnosis is easier for the physician to make when the patient is able to answer questions.
  • Family and loved ones might be confused by particular behaviors which will be explained.
  • An early diagnosis allows individuals to take advantage of support groups, and caregivers to learn ways to better manage medications, the environment, etc.
  • Getting an early diagnosis provides the opportunity to enroll in a clinical trial.
  • The patient can prioritize what is important to them while they are still able to make decisions.

What new tests are available to detect Alzheimer’s?

PrecivityAD is the first blood test for Alzheimer’s to be cleared for widespread use and one of a new generation of such assays that could enable early detection of the leading neurodegenerative disease—perhaps decades before the onset of the first symptoms. The test uses mass spectrometry to detect specific types of beta-amyloid, the protein fragment that is the culprit in Alzheimer’s disease. As plaques in the brain build up, levels of beta-amyloid decline in the surrounding fluid. The levels can be measured in spinal fluid samples. The new blood test can determine where beta-amyloid concentrations are significantly lower. PrecivityAd is designed to be used for people 60 to 91 years old with early signs of cognitive impairment.

How it works

  • Your doctor orders the PrecivityAd blood test and schedules a blood draw appointment.
  • Your blood sample is sent to the lab for analysis by mass spectrometry.
  • Your doctor receives the report and discusses the results with you.

How much does it cost?

The test costs $1,250. Since it is new and is not currently covered by private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid, patients must pay out-of-pocket for the test. A six-month interest-free payment plan is available, and a financial assistance program is available for patients who medically and financially qualify. The assistance program can bring the costs down to between $25 and $400 for eligible patients.

Other causes for memory issues

One benefit of the PrecivityADTM blood test is that if Alzheimer’s markers
are not detected, additional costly tests may be avoidable and your physician can explore other causes for memory and cognitive issues. Other causes for memory issues include: hypothyroidism, head trauma or injury, certain medications or a combination of medications, emotional disorders, depression, strokes, amnesia, alcoholism, vitamin B012 deficiency, hydrocephalus, brain tumors, and other brain diseases.

New drug for delaying symptoms

The FDA recently approved a new drug for Alzheimer’s. Aducanumab isn’t a cure, but it’s the first drug to get this far in an approval process that actually modifies the underlying pathology of the disease, and helps delay cognitive decline in early stage Alzheimer’s. Read about it in my last post. https://wordpress.com/post/barbracohn.com/6470

Clinical research studies for people with early symptomatic Alzheimer’s

The objective of a clinical research study is to answer questions about the safety and effectiveness of potential new medications. These studies have to be completed before a new treatment is offered to the public. There are currently more than 3000,000 clinical studies taking place throughout the world.

For those who are qualified, taking part in research studies offers several benefits:

  • Getting actively involved in their own health care
  • Having access to potentially new research treatments 
  • Having access to expert medical care for the condition being studied, since investigators are often specialists in the disease area being studied
  • Helping others by contributing to medical research

One way to find information about clinical trials is by searching this website: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. ClinicalTrials.gov is an interactive online database, managed by the National Library of Medicine. It provides information about both federally and privately supported clinical research. ClinicalTrials.gov is updated regularly and offers information on each trial’s purpose, who is qualified to participate, locations, and phone numbers to call for more information.

The Alzheimer’s Association also has a service called TrialMatch that provides customized lists of clinical studies based on user-provider information. The free, easy-to-use platform allows you to see which studies are a good fit for you or a family member.
Visit TrialMatch
. You can also call 800.272.3900 or email TrialMatch@alz.org to get started. You’re under no obligation to participate. You can reach out to researchers directly to sign up, or let researchers know that you are open to being contacted with more information about their study. You can also browse available clinical studies by location and type, or sign up to be notified when new studies are posted that are relevant to you.



Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.

Why it’s important to get an early diagnosis when cognitive problems appear

Doctor talking with patient

There were several indications that something was wrong with my husband two years before he was diagnosed. This tall, good-looking man, a graduate of the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, was having trouble calculating how much tip to leave a waitress. When we went to Spain for our twenty-fifth anniversary, Morris couldn’t figure out how much money the hotel would cost in dollars. This man, who once memorized trains and airplane schedules without even trying, followed me around the city like a puppy dog as we boarded a subway or bus enroute to tourist attractions.

That following fall — our daughter’s last year in high school — Morris couldn’t give directions to a friend who was taking the SAT at the high school my husband had attended. I got out the map to help him, but he couldn’t read the map. That was the moment I knew something was very wrong. When he left for a road trip to California without our son and forgot his suitcase, I sat on the stairs and cried. I couldn’t deny it any longer. I had a strong suspicion that Morris had Alzheimer’s disease, and although I pleaded with him for two years to see a neurologist, he refused.

What if he had gotten an early diagnosis? Would it have helped?

There’s no way to know for sure, but probably it would have. Because as soon as he started taking Aricept he stopped getting lost driving around our small city. And I started giving him nutritional supplements, which also seemed to help. Read “5 Things that Help Dementia that your Doctor Probably Hasn’t Mentioned.” https://barbracohn.com/2019/09/25/5-things-that-help-dementia-that-your-doctor-probably-hasnt-mentioned/

Professionals, both researchers and physicians and the Alzheimer’s Association, recommend that an early, accurate diagnosis is the key to living a less stressful life for both the patient and the family.

Here’s why:

  1. Cognitive problems can be caused by a number of physical conditions other than Alzheimer’s disease, vascular cognitive impairment, Lewy Bodies dementia and Frontotemporal dementia (FTD). These include thyroid problems, hydrocephalus, a brain tumor, and even depression. When my mother was severely dehydrated and hospitalized with a urinary tract infection (UTI), a psychiatrist called to tell me that she had full-blown dementia. “No she doesn’t,” I said. And sure enough, after being put on an IV saline drip Mom regained her full mental capacity. Memory problems can result from dehydration, severe diabetes and some forms of Parkinson’s disease, traumatic brain injury, HIV, and Huntington’s disease.

Certain medications can affect mental clarity and balance. Be sure to ask your pharmacist about drug contraindications, and interactions with natural supplements. Alcohol abuse and binge drinking can destroy brain cells that are critical for memory, thinking, and decision making and mimic or lead to dementia.

2. Cognitive symptoms may be reversible. There are a number of holistic doctors who claim that their protocol can treat the root cause of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. Please read my blog ” Significant study points to MIND diet for improving brain health and preventing Alzheimer’s disease.” https://barbracohn.com/2018/11/09/significant-study-points-to-mind-diet-for-improving-brain-health-and-preventing-alzheimers-disease/

Dale Bredesen, MD, a physician scientist in the Department of Pharmacology at UCLA who’s published more than 220 papers on Alzheimer’s, has spent 30 years looking at the root causes of the neurodegenerative phenomenon in hopes of eradicating it. In 2018, Bredesen published the case studies of more than 100 patients in cognitive decline in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease & Parkinsonism. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/reversal-of-cognitive-decline-100-patients-2161-0460-1000450.pdf

In her editorial in the Lancet Neurology, published in May 2020, Joanna Hellmuth, MD, of the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, said the “Bredesen protocol” – named by neurologist Dale Bredesen, MD – has reeled in patients and their families seeking hope outside of the physician’s office for a disease that is currently incurable.

The Bredesen protocol is propounded in his 2017 bestseller The End of Alzheimer’s Program and can be accessed for $1,399, which includes protocol assessments, lab tests and contact with practitioners, who provide the regimen for additional fees. Online support and cognitive games are available for an additional monthly charge. This protocol is timely, costly and requires steadfastness. But if you have the time and means, it’s probably worth a try.

3. An early diagnosis is empowering. Before the disease has progressed to the point where decision making is difficult, the patient can be included in financial and estate planning, creating end-of-life wishes and durable power of attorney decisions, etc.

4. An early diagnosis is easier for the physician to make when the patient is able to answer questions. Later in the progression of the disease, the patient isn’t able to make observations or answer accurately.

5. Family and loved ones who might be confused by particular behaviors such as anger, depression, disinterest, can better understand why their parent or spouse or significant other is behaving the way they are. This helps to preserve the person’s dignity rather than have someone close to them yell at them, treat them poorly, or want to distance them self, etc.

6. Individuals diagnosed early can take advantage of support groups, and caregivers can learn ways to better manage medications, and learn strategies for coping with unexpected and unusual behaviors and the ordinary progression of the disease. The Alzheimer’s Association was a godsend for me. I was able to connect with other caregivers who knew exactly what I was going through. I could talk about what was happening all day with my best friend, but there was no way she would be able to fully understand the stress of caregiving and the grief of losing a partner to Alzheimer’s. https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/research_progress/clinical-trials/about-clinical-trials

7. Getting an early diagnosis provides the opportunity to possibly enroll in a clinical trial. TrialMatch is a clinical trial matching service for Alzheimer’s and other dementias. It is a free, easy-to-use service that connects individuals living with AD, caregivers, and healthy volunteers with current research studies. Their continuously updated database of AD clinical studies includes hundreds of pharmacological and non-pharmacological studies being conducted at sites throughout the U.S. and online.

8. An early diagnosis allows the patient to prioritize what is important to them, whether it’s creating a masterpiece or traveling the world. There is still time at this point in the disease to enjoy a happy, satisfying life.

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Barbra Cohn cared for her husband Morris for 10 years. He passed away from younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. Afterward, she was compelled to write “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia”—Winner of the 2018 Book Excellence Award in Self-Help—in order to help other caregivers feel healthier and happier, have more energy, sleep better, feel more confident, deal with feelings of guilt and grief, and to ultimately experience inner peace. “Calmer Waters” is available at AmazonBarnes & NobleBoulder Book StoreTattered Cover Book Store,  Indie Bound.org, and many other fine independent bookstores, as well as public libraries.