Is it forgetfulness, dementia or Alzheimer’s?

Senior Woman Comforting Depressed Husband Sitting On Bench

At one time or another, most of us have forgotten where we put our keys, our phone, glasses, or even parked our car. Have you ever walked into a room and forgotten why you went in? Sure. Run into an acquaintance and forgotten the person’s name? Yes, and it’s embarrassing.

It doesn’t mean you have dementia or Alzheimer’s. I call memory blips “brain farts.” They become more common as we age because our brains form fewer connections so the memory is not as strong as it once was. Also, the speed at which our brain processes stored facts, figures and names becomes slower. Recall becomes slower. (One trick I have for bringing up a person’s forgotten name is to go through the alphabet. It almost always works.)

Forgetfulness can be a normal part of the aging process, or it could be triggered by these physical conditions:

  • insomnia, or lack of sleep (for help in this area read 16 ways to sleep better)
  • thyroid condition
  • drug interactions
  • too much caffeine and/or alcohol
  • stress (Read 16 Stress busters)
  • vitamin B12 deficiency
  • UTIs –urinary tract infections
  • dehydration (please remember to drink at least 6 glasses of water every day)
  • depression and/or mood disorders

The best way to rule out memory problems is to have a full physical exam including a blood panel. Please make an appointment with your doctor to discuss your concerns. Sometimes a memory issue can be cleared up by just getting more sleep or by taking a vitamin B complex supplement.

But if you find yourself putting your keys or your phone in strange places like the refrigerator, getting lost in the city you’ve lived in for decades, or forgetting how to scramble your eggs, this could be indicative of a more serious problem.

Dementia or Alzheimer’s? 

Dementia is the name for an umbrella of  brain disorders with the primary symptoms being memory loss, inability to think clearly or to express oneself, difficulty making decisions and solving problems, and trouble controlling emotions. The term dementia usually refers to degenerative conditions of the brain that result from trauma, as in the brain injuries found in athletes, but more commonly it is used to refer to conditions related to a disease.

Dementia is a major symptom of these diseases:

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common neurocognitive disorder and affects almost 6 million Americans. The number of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease is expected to nearly triple over the next generation. In the early stage of the disease, people with the disease will find it difficult to remember recent events such as what they had for dinner the night before, or even just a few hours ago. They will most likely be depressed because they can’t manage things as well as they used to. An active person might lose interest in things that used to excite them. And the person might forget names of people near and dear. As the disease progresses, emotional behavior will change, the ability to communicate will be impaired and confusion will take over. Everyday tasks such as bathing will become a challenge. Later, physical changes will occur such as the inability to walk or talk and eventually swallow, which often leads to death.

Frontotemporal dementia often emerges around the age of 60 years, but it can appear in people who are in their 20s. It involves a loss of nerve cells and affects behavior, language and movement.

Dementia with Lewy bodies can resemble those of Alzheimer’s disease, but there may also be sleep disturbances, visual hallucinations, and an unsteady walking pattern. Lewy bodies are collections of protein that develop inside nerve cells and prevent them from functioning properly.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease represents a number of brain diseases that cause problems throughout the body. They are thought to be triggered by prion proteins. A prion is neither a virus nor a bacterium, but it can cause a disease. Types of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or “mad cow disease.” Symptoms include rapid memory, behavior, and movement changes. It is a rare and fatal condition.

CTE–Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy is a progressive degenerative disease which afflicts the brain of people who have suffered repeated concussions and traumatic brain injuries, such as athletes in contact sports such as football. s

Huntington’s disease is a genetic disorder that results from a defect on chromosome 4. It can lead to mood changes, abnormal movements, and depression. The person may experience an ongoing decline in thinking and reasoning skills. There could be slurred speech and problems with coordination. It tends to appear between the ages of 30 and 50 years.

Parkinson’s disease is a motor system disorder. The hallmark signs include trembling, especially tremor in the hands. It can also involve depression and behavioral changes. In the later stages, the individual may have difficulty speaking and sleep disturbances.

Vascular dementia, also known as post-stroke dementia, can appear after a stroke, when there is bleeding or vessel blockage in the brain. It affects a person’s thinking and physical movements. Early symptoms may include an inability to organize, plan, or make decisions.

Preventing dementia

Although there is no cure yet, there are measures you can take NOW to stave off brain and mental decline. Click here to read 8 Ways to Train Your Brain.

Additionally, here is my list of 10 recommendations for maintaining cognitive function and boosting brain power

  1. Drink at least 8-10 glasses of water to keep your body hydrated and to flush out toxins. The brain is 70% water when fully hydrated. When it is dehydrated, neurotransmission—which is heavily dependent on water—is impaired, resulting in poor memory, concentration and impaired abstract thinking.
  2. Ginkgo biloba has been proven in hundreds of studies to help blood circulation to the brain, sharpening mental performance, increasing concentration and short-term memory. A well-known study in The Journal of the American Medical Association showed that supplementation with 40 mg of ginkgo three times a day for one year had a positive effect on patients with Alzheimer’s disease. A placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trail of an extract of Ginkgo biloba for dementia.
  3. Vitamin B complex optimizes cognitive activity and brain function, has a positive effect on memory, learning capacity and attention span, and supports a healthy nervous system and a stable mood. Vitamins B6 and B12, in particular, play a role in the synthesis of serotonin, the neurotransmitter linked to improving memory, lifting mood and regulating sleep.
  4. Omega-3 fatty acids are rich in DHA, the major unsaturated fat in the brain. This long-chain fatty acid provides the necessary fluid quality to the membranes of the nerve cells so that electrical nerve impulses can flow easily along the circuits of the brain. One study found that Alzheimer’s patients given an omega-3-rich supplement experienced a significant improvement in their quality of life.
  5. Eat more blueberries! Their active antioxidants have been shown to protect and restore brain function. One recent study revealed that feeding blueberry extracts to mature mice partially reversed some signs of brain aging.
  6. Avoid alcohol. People who drink too much alcohol often show shrinkage or atrophy of the cerebral cortex, the seat of memory, learning, reasoning, intelligence, and emotions. Reduced cortical thickness in abstinent alcoholics and association with alcoholic behavior
  7. Avoid smoking. Smoking constricts blood vessels, making less blood, oxygen, and nutrients available to the brain. It also replaces oxygen with carbon monoxide, a chemical that damages brain cells.
  8. Incorporate a regular exercise program into your daily routine. An easy way to start is by walking 30 minutes a day at least five times a week. Yoga is wonderful for staving off arthritis pain, maintaining flexibility and for relaxation.
  9. Maintain your social connections. Loneliness can actually lead to health problems and mental decline. Join a group—any kind of group: worship, hiking, scrabble, table tennis, knitting, discussion group, or book club. Volunteer at a food bank, soup kitchen or animal shelter. It’s important to stay connected and to feel as though you are a contributing member of society.
  10. Sleep well by getting to bed before 11:00 pm, eating your last meal before 8pm, turning off your electronic devices, and eliminating light in your bedroom. Studies have indicated that sleep deprivation can increase risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. If you have trouble sleeping consider using a lavender essential oil spray on your pillow or a sachet of lavender inserted into the pillowcase. There are lots of natural sleep aids available at your local health food store, such as melatonin, calcium/magnesium, valerian, hops, etc. Consult with a nutritional consultant about what might work best for you.

For more information on how you can reduce stress and boost your happiness and health, read Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia.

BarbraCohn__

 

10 Ways caregivers can reduce stress and feel instant relief

Spa still-life.

June is Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, and in celebration of the anniversary of the release of my book “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia” this month I will be posting ways that caregivers can relieve stress, feel better and more energetic, and forge a stronger connection to the person they lovingly care for.

  1. Before you get out of bed in the morning, breathe deeply and for a minute or two repeat an affirmation such as: “Today will be a good day.” “I am a loving, patient person.” “I’m feeling strong and healthy today.” “I am grateful for my family and friends.” “I am a kind, compassionate caregiver.”
  2. Eat a good breakfast. Your blood sugar is low when you awake after fasting for 6-8 hours. Support healthy blood glucose levels by eating protein, a complex carbohydrate, and colorful fruits or veggies for vitamins and antioxidants. A bowl of cereal with low or no-fat milk doesn’t cut it. As a caregiver you need the energy to get you through the morning. My favorite energy-boosting, neurotransmitter supporting breakfast is eggs (anyway you like them), sautéed kale or spinach with onions, a side of beans and melon or strawberries to finish it off. Yes, it sounds like a lot, and it is. But the portions can be small and you can use your left-over veggies from dinner the night before. Of if you want a lighter breakfast during summer, have a protein smoothie with yogurt, protein powder and fruit. Just make sure that whatever you eat includes high-quality protein.
  3. Go for a walk. If your care partner is ambulatory, take him or her with you. Research published in the March 2017 issue of “Cell Metabolism” found that a brisk walk could help slow the aging process. In “Calmer Waters,” researcher Monika Fleshner, PhD writes “Based on the research that my colleagues and I have done in the past thirteen years, we know that regular physical activity promotes stress robustness (resistance to stress) and changes the way the brain and body respond to stressors. . . If you are highly conditioned from a regular exercise routine, then you can respond better psychologically and physically.” (pg. 174, “Calmer Waters”)
  4. Sing in the shower, sing with your care partner, sing in a spiritual setting. “Music engagement can help you connect with your loved ones and care partner. Oxytocin, the chemical in our brain that is released during intimate interactions such as breastfeeding and intercourse, helps us to form trust and bonds with other humans. It is fascinating that this chemical is also emitted when people sing and make music together,” says neurologic music therapist Rebekah Stewart, MA. (pg. 224 “Calmer Waters”)
  5. Stay present. Learning how to stay present enhances how you relate to the person you are caring for, allowing you to create community with that person. The simple act of breathing with someone—of matching your breath to his or hers—enables you to create a spiritual connection with that person.
  6. Create a soothing space. Light a candle, enjoy a vase of fresh flowers, light incense, listen to uplifting music.
  7. Use aromatherapy oils to uplift the spirit and calm you down. Explore the variety of essential oils which can be used in a diffuser, spritzed on a pillow case, shirt collar or handkerchief or tissue that you can tuck in your shirt pocket.
  8. Dance as though no one is watching you. Dance alone in your living room to your favorite music, or with your care partner. It is an easy way to get the blood flowing, loosen up stiff muscles, and a fast and easy way to uplift your mood.
  9. Get a dog (if you don’t have one). “Animal Assisted Therapy is recognized by the National Institute of Mental Health as a type of psychotherapy for treating depression and other mood disorders. Spending time with an animal seems to promote a sense of emotional connectedness and well-being. Touching and playing with animals is a wonderful way for families coping with Alzheimer’s disease to experience joy, fun, and laughter,” says Diana McQuarrie, Founder and Executive Director Emeritus of Denver Pet Partners. (pg. 107 “Calmer Waters)
  10. Laugh. Charlie Chaplin once said that “A day without humor is a day wasted.” No matter how hard things seem, even if you are a caregiver to someone who has been ill for many years, try to find the humor in everyday things. My husband had Alzheimer’s disease and toward the end of his life he had trouble eating a sandwich. Once he asked, “What is this?” after I handed him a chicken salad sandwich. When I told him what it was he responded by throwing the sandwich across the table and exclaiming, “This chicken is dead!” I burst out laughing and because laughter is contagious so did he. Watch YouTube funny videos of animals, children, etc. when you’re feeling down. You will soon be laughing and the endorphins will flow and uplift your mood.

16 Stress-busters to nourish your body, mind and soul

Girl can't sleep

Susan, a recent divorcee, is the 48-year-old mother of two college students. She works full-time as a legal secretary and after work she helps her mother, who is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. On weekends Susan catches up on her errands and shops for her mom.  During the week she falls into bed exhausted at 9 p.m. . . . if her mom doesn’t require extra help. But Susan can’t sleep. She’s too worried about everything she has to do, and she is worried about her mom. Susan develops an ulcer and is diagnosed with hypertension. Unfortunately, Susan is a composite of the more than 16 million caregivers in the United States who spend 18 billion hours of unpaid time each year caring for a loved one with dementia.

Every day, one million Americans are absent from work because of stress-related disorders. Experts agree that stress is a factor in most diseases, and a major factor in disorders such as anxiety, insomnia, depression, ulcers, rheumatoid arthritis, headache, hypoglycemia, asthma, herpes, hypertension and heart disease.

Yet, stress is a fact of life. Even a positive experience like a new job, marriage or house can be a stress-provoking event—because stress is defined as a reaction to any stimulus that upsets our normal functioning. The bad news is we all have to face stress. The good news is, it’s easier than ever to neutralize stress before it takes its toll. The key is to maintain a balance, both mentally and physically, so stress doesn’t upset your equilibrium.

The Chemistry of Stress

First, let’s look at what happens to your body as a result of stress.

Once upon a time, stress was episodic. For instance, if a tiger approached you, your body released stress hormones to help you fight or flee. By the time the encounter was over, the entire stress response had been fully utilized and the body returned to normal.

The Fight-or-Flight Response looks something like this:

  • Pupils dilate to sharpen vision.
  • Heart rate and blood pressure increase to accelerate the delivery of oxygen to fuel the muscles and critical organs.
  • Blood flow is diverted from non-critical areas such as the gastrointestinal tract to the critical areas such as the heart, skeletal muscles and liver.
  • Liver releases glucose and fatty acids into the bloodstream. Glucose is for immediate energy; fat is needed when the fight-or-flight response lasts longer than expected.
  • Bronchial tubes dilate to maximize the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

Today, however, you may be sitting at a desk or driving your car when the stress mechanism is triggered. The modern response is not to fight or flee, but to gnash your teeth, grip the steering wheel, scream, yell or “stuff it.” Our bodies are in a constant state of “emergency alert,’ and the results can be devastating:

  • Blood pressure rises. Depending on how many stressful situations you encounter, it may stay elevated, damaging the sensitive tubules of your kidneys. Ultimately, kidney function is compromised, which raises your blood pressure even more, which contributes to further kidney damage, which raises blood pressure…
  • Glucose that is dumped into your bloodstream goes unused, so your body has to produce an enormous amount of insulin to handle it. Eventually, this may result in hypoglycemia or diabetes.
  • Fat that is dumped into your blood also goes unused, so it clogs your arteries, leading to cardiovascular disease.
  • If you drink caffeine, the stress hormone cortisol becomes elevated, which can set you up for countless health problems including: poor quality of sleep, impaired immunity and age-related deterioration.
  • The adrenal glands produce or contribute to the production of about 150 hormones—all vital to your health. When they are stressed, they become exhausted. Once the adrenal buffer is gone, you become a prime candidate for asthma, allergy, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and other autoimmune disorders.

Devise a Plan that Works for You

So, how do your live in the 21st century and not let stress affect your health?

First of all, you need a plan to help you deal with tough issues, so you can think more clearly and act from a calm, centered position. That plan should include a good diet, and excellent nutritional support with nutrients that enhance relaxation. Establish a daily routine that includes plenty of quality sleep, exercise and a stress-reducing or relaxation technique. Just keep in mind that even though it’s impossible not to have some stress in your life, you can strengthen and nourish yourself on a daily basis, so that you’re better prepared to deal with the next challenge life has to offer.

16 Stress-busters to nourish your body, mind and soul

Daytime

1) Get proper nutritional support to help stop free radical damage, and eat a balanced diet.

2) Exercise! It lowers stress hormones and gives you more energy. Choose an activity that you enjoy and is appropriate for your age and condition. And do it regularly!

3) Learn a relaxation technique such as meditation or yoga. Research has shown they both lower blood pressure, relieve anxiety, enhance overall health, accelerate weight loss, improve sleep and increase blood levels of DHEA. It also restores your sense of clarity and purpose.

4) Laughter is real medicine. It’s a tension tamer and your body produces endorphins (“feel good”chemicals) when you laugh. Rent a funny movie or play charades.

5) Learn to “let go.” Next time you’re in a traffic jam, instead of getting worked up about something you have no control over, use the time to visualize something you want to happen … or listen to a new book-on-tape.

6) Avoid stimulants such as tobacco, caffeine, sugar or coping-solutions that involve alcohol or drugs. Using a chemical means of reducing your stress leads to addiction and increases your problems.

7) Get outside! A little sunlight every day will enhance your body’s natural rhythms and provide you with vitamin D.

8) Take regular breaks at work. Get up and stretch, roll your neck and make sure you drink at least 8-10 glasses of water a day.

 

Nighttime

9) Wind down earlier in the evening. It’s difficult to fall asleep after working late or watching a suspenseful movie. Relax instead with an inspirational book, soft music and a cup of herbal tea or warm milk.

10) A warm bath helps increase circulation to the skin and relax the muscles. Add a few drops of pine needle essence, oil of eucalyptus, mustard powder or lavender oil for a soothing effect.

11) Take five minutes at the end of each day to prepare for the next. Don’t make long lists. Rather, prioritize. It will help you feel more in control.

12) Go to bed earlier. Research shows that the hours of sleep before 2 a.m. are more rejuvenating than the hours after 2 a.m. Sleeping from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. will do you more good than sleeping from midnight to 7 a.m.

13) Don’t eat right before bed. Your digestive system won’t get the break it needs, and you won’t feel completely rested in the morning.

14) Cut back on caffeine. If you do consume caffeine, be moderate and try not to consume any after 2pm.

16) Put a sachet filled with lavender flowers under your pillow for sweet dreams.

 

The 10 best ways to observe National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

Ribbons of awarenessIt’s November, which means it’s time to enjoy your Thanksgiving with family and friends.

  1. It’s also time to do your brain a favor and take advantage of the free cognitive exam as part of Medicare’s Yearly Wellness Exam.

Despite clear signs that their memory and thinking abilities have gone downhill, researchers have found that more than half of seniors with these symptoms haven’t seen a doctor about them. University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues say their findings suggest that as many as 1.8 million Americans over the age of 70 with dementia are not evaluated for cognitive symptoms by a medical provider, which in some patients can lead to a failure to uncover modifiable causes of thinking or memory impairment.

The study, published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, documents a clear lack of clinical testing for seniors with signs of cognitive problems.“Early evaluation and identification of people with dementia may help them receive care earlier,” says study author Vikas Kotagal, M.D., M.S., who sees patients at the University of Michigan Health System and is an assistant professor in the U-M Medical School’s Department of Neurology. “It can help families make plans for care, help with day-to-day tasks including observed medication administration, and watch for future problems that can occur. In some instances, these interventions could substantially improve the person’s quality of life.”

For instance, knowing that a stroke or vascular issues in the brain caused dementia means patients can work to control risk factors like blood pressure that might otherwise cause it to keep worsening. If your physician suspects Alzheimer’s disease, there are drugs that can help delay the onset of full-blown dementia, and the possibility of placement in a memory care facility, which can help offset the catastrophic cost of the disease.

If you’ve had Part B for longer than 12 months, you can get the free Medicare Annual Wellness Exam to develop or update a personalized plan to prevent disease and disability based on your current health and risk factors. The exam includes:
• A review of your medical and family history
• Developing or updating a list of current providers and prescriptions
• Height, weight, blood pressure, and other routine measurements
 Detection of any cognitive impairment
• Personalized health advice
• A list of risk factors and treatment options for you
• A screening schedule (like a checklist) for appropriate preventive services. Get details about coverage for screenings, shots, and other preventive services.
This visit is covered once every 12 months (11 full months must have passed since the last visit).

2. Combat stress by playing relaxing music, dancing, using an aromatherapy diffuser, taking an Epsom salt bath, turning off electronics at least an hour before bed, etc. Health professionals agree that stress can lead to chronic illness. And in the case of caregiving, it can actually take years off your life.

3. Become a savvy caregiver. The Alzheimer’s Association has chapters throughout the U.S. and offer free classes ranging from how to make financial plans to learning about the latest research in dementia care. Check out their  Education and Resource Center.

4. Maintain healthy weight. Women with a thick waistline are at increased risk for dementia. As if you don’t have enough to worry about. A 32-year-long study by Swedish researchers, which was recently published in the scientific journal Neurology, found that women who gain weight around their middle and live to at least 70 years old are at twice the risk for developing dementia.

Medical research has already established a link between fat around your middle and a higher risk of dying prematurely from heart attack or stroke. But this new research provides even more incentive for reducing calories obtained from refined carbohydrates such as breads, pastries, cookies, candy, ice cream and pasta.

The research included almost 1,500 women between the ages of 38 and 60 and was started at the end of the 1960s. Thirty-two years later a follow-up found that 161 women with the average age of 75, had developed dementia. This study shows that women who had a pear-shape figure, broader around the waist than hips, had more than twice the risk of developing dementia when they got old.

What is Metabolic Syndrome?

Also called Syndrome X, it’s caused by a diet filled with refined carbohydrates. The cycle goes like this: you eat a bagel with some orange juice and coffee for breakfast. Have an apple mid-morning. A salad with a piece of French bread for lunch. A handful of M & Ms mid-afternoon, pasta and salad for dinner, and some popcorn later while you’re watching TV. Doesn’t sound too terrible. But the thing is, these foods are mostly simple carbohydrates, which means your digestive system converts them into glucose, which causes your blood sugar to rise quickly. Your pancreas responds by pumping out insulin to convert the glucose into quick energy.

The problem is, the more carbohydrates you eat, the more your body pumps out insulin to deal with all the extra blood sugar. Eventually your body becomes overwhelmed by the amount of insulin and sluggish in response to it. Before you know it, you’ve developed insulin resistance, meaning your cells have lost their sensitivity to the hormone and require even more of it to maintain normal glucose levels. When blood sugar and insulin levels go up, Metabolic Syndrome (Syndrome X) and weight gain result.

What can you do about it?

  • If you tend to grow love handles around your middle, do something now to protect your heart and brain.
  • Limit the amount of carbohydrates you eat
  • Include a high-quality protein with every meal, such as salmon or chicken
  • Exercise regularly

Add whole foods to your diet instead of highly processed foods, including brown rice, quinoa, and whole oats, 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables, cottage cheese, eggs

Take nutritional supplements proven to support healthy glucose levels: Bitter melon Momordica charantia), cinnamon, green tea extract, Salacia reticulata, Banaba leaf, chromium

5. Get regular dental check-ups. It’s hard to determine which comes first, Alzheimer’s disease or inflamed gums, but they seem to go hand in hand. A recent study done at the College of Dentistry, NYU, New York, NY proposes that chronic periodontitis might contribute to the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease

And in the famous Nun Study, one of the first documented studies of Alzheimer’s in a specific population, the researchers found that the participants with the fewest teeth had a higher incidence of dementia. In fact, the researchers concluded that having very few teeth -one to nine-might be a predictor of dementia late in life

How to prevent gum disease

Frequent dental visits may become necessary to ensure a thorough cleaning of the teeth, roots and gums.

Supplementation with vitamin C is important in order to try to maintain healthy gum tissue.

Lycopene may be effective in treating and preventing gingivitis. Lycopene is the carotenoid which makes tomatoes red. It is a popular supplement for supporting prostate and cardiovascular health, and helps prevent macular degeneration and other types of cancer. A recent study compared just taking lycopene as a supplement to a combination treatment of taking lycopene and root scaling and planing in patients with gingivitis. The groups that were treated demonstrated significant reductions in gingivitis, but the group that received both lycopene and prophylaxis showed a statistically significant reduction in symptoms.The results presented in this study suggest that lycopene shows great promise as a treatment for gingivitis.

Gingvitis vs. Periodontitis

Gingivitis (gum inflammation) usually precedes periodontitis (gum disease). The gums can become swollen and red, and they may bleed while brushing your teeth. Although the gums may be irritated, the teeth are still firmly planted in their sockets, and at this stage, no bone or other tissue damage has occurred.

When gingivitis is left untreated, it can advance to periodontitis, which is an infection caused by bacteria under the gum tissue. The gums can pull away from the tooth, bone can be lost, and the teeth may loosen or even fall out.

Warning signs of periodontal disease:

  • Bad breath or bad taste that won’t go away
  • Red or swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Painful chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Gums that have pulled away from your teeth
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Any change in the fit of partial dentures

6. Buy a new pair of walking shoes and a comfortable workout outfit. You deserve it! You also owe it to yourself to move your body. For years, health professionals have been preaching about the importance of exercise to cardiovascular and overall health. “Whatever is good for the heart is good for the brain.” The latest study of older adults at increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease is the first evidence that physical activity may protect against cognitive decline and the onset of dementia symptoms in people who carry the genetic marker for Alzheimer’s.

The hippocampus, the brain region responsible for memory and spatial orientation, normally loses some volume as we age. But overtime, people with an increased genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease experience greater atrophy in that area of the brain, which means they experience greater memory loss and cognitive dysfunction.

The good news is that Dr. J. Carson Smith, a kinesiology researcher in the University of Maryland School of Public Health, and his colleagues found clear evidence that being physically active has the potential to help protect the hippocampus in people at increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. This is especially significant because if you know that exercise can help delay the onset of the disease and if you engage in an exercise regimen it could extend your longevity and ability to take care of yourself. This, in turn, would reduce the financial burden of needing a caregiver and other medical intervention.

Dr. Smith and colleagues tracked four groups of healthy older adults ages 65-89, who had normal cognitive abilities, over an 18-month period and measured the volume of their hippocampus (using structural magnetic resonance imaging or MRI) at the beginning and end of that time period. The groups were classified both for low or high Alzheimer’s risk (based on the absence or presence of the apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele) and for low or high physical activity levels.

Of all four groups studied, only those at high genetic risk for Alzheimer’s who did not exercise experienced a decrease in hippocampal volume (3%) over the 18-month period. All other groups, including those at high risk for Alzheimer’s but who were physically active, maintained the volume of their hippocampus.

Whether you are at high risk for Alzheimer’s or not, it’s never too late or too early to start a daily exercise regimen. If you are sedentary start walking 30 minutes three days a walk, and go from there. Park your car at the opposite end of the parking lot, from where you need to go. Get a walking buddy, or get a dog. Whatever you do, be serious about being physically active. It could have a huge impact on your life and the lives of your loved ones.

7. Sleep more soundly. There are plenty of studies linking poor sleep to a host of physical and psychological ailments: poor immunity, elevated levels of cortisol and insulin, weight gain, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and even Alzheimer’s disease. And irritability, foggy thinking and anxiety, depression and low energy can directly impact your ability to care for another person, do household chores and get in the way of your interpersonal relationships. Discover ways why Good sleep hygiene is the first step to improving your sleep.

8. Include turmeric in your diet. Turmeric is what gives curry its yellow hue and tang. But it does a lot more than flavor the most popular Indian dish. Turmeric has numerous health benefits. Several studies have found a protective effect of curcumin in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, and it’s no surprise. The senior population in rural Indian has one of the lowest rates of Alzheimer’s disease in the world, and scientists believe it is due to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric, and its ability to inhibit the build up of amyloid plaque.

A study done by researchers from the University of Melbourne indicated that curcumin might prevent or improve age-related cognitive decline, dementia and mood disorders. The study included 60 adults between 60 and 85 years old. An hour after taking a curcumin supplement (400 mg) the participants experienced a higher attention span and better memory when compared to the participants who took a placebo. After four weeks of taking the supplement, the curcumin group showed improvement in mood, memory, alertness and feelings of well-being.

How much to take? You can find dietary supplements in tablet and capsule form at health food stores with curcumin extracts in dosages of 400 to 600 mg. The general advice is to take one dose three times daily or as directed on the product.

How to get more turmeric into your diet?

One way is to drink turmeric tea, which is popular among Okinawans, who are known for their longevity.
• Bring four cups of water to a boil.
• Add one teaspoon of ground turmeric and reduce to a simmer for 10 minutes.
• Strain the tea through a fine sieve into a cup, add honey and/or lemon to taste

Sprinkle it on your food—turmeric is especially good added to braised greens. Saute onion in olive oil, add greens of your choice (kale, spinach, Swiss chard), and add 1 tsp of turmeric and a sprinkle of salt.
Add turmeric to eggs, soups, potato pancakes, casseroles. You can’t go wrong, and you can’t overdose on turmeric.

Use as a cold, flu and congestion remedy
Turmeric has been used as a natural remedy for centuries to help prevent and cure respiratory illnesses. The next time you get a cold, try adding it to hot water with grated ginger and a teaspoon of honey. It will perk you up and possibly reduce the length of time you are sick. You might also discover that it helps your memory.

9. Is it time to move your loved one to a memory care home? If your loved one has Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia and it is getting difficult to provide a safe environment for him/her, please take the time NOW, before a crisis arises, is the time to investigate the memory care homes in your area. A good place to start is by calling the county’s senior social services office, or by speaking with an ombudsman who is knowledgeable about the pros and cons of the local memory care homes. Signs that it’s time to make the big move.

10. Evaluate your driving.  Play it safe. If you or a loved one has dementia, please park you car for good. Don’t take a risk of getting lost or worse, injuring yourself or someone else.

November is the perfect time to incorporate a new health regimen into your daily routine. Start today and get a head start at the beginning of the holiday season to maintain healthy weight, strengthen your immunity to flus and colds, and  protect your mental health and memory. 

 

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!!!

For more information on how you can reduce stress and boost your happiness and health, read Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s & Dementia.

BarbraCohn__

8 Ways to Train Your Brain

Intelligence of the human brain

Intelligence of the human brain

National Train Your Brain Day is observed annually on October 13. The observance was created to encourage all of us to exercise our brain and improve our cognitive skills. Doing word puzzles and number games, playing Bridge and reading are every-day activities that are good for the brain. But there are many other things you can do.

  1. Dance as though no one is watching. My book “Calmer Waters: The Caregiver’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s and Dementia” includes a 21-year-long study that was summarized in an article that appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2003. The study found that when compared to 11 other activities including team sports, swimming and bicycling, dancing is the best activity for supporting cognition and staving off mental decline. In fact, the more complex the dance, the better it is for enhancing problem-solving skills and memory. You don’t have to be a great dancer. Just put on your favorite dance music and let loose in your living room. Or, find a dance partner and learn how to salsa, tango, or swing.
  2. Play an instrument. Numerous studies have indicated that listening to music and playing an instrument can reduce anxiety and depression and support cognitive functioning. Playing an instrument sharpens your concentration, boosts listening skills, and supports your time management and organizational skills. The efficacy of music therapy A Study done at the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and led by Nina Kraus, shows that musicians suffer less from aging-related memory and hearing losses than non-musicians. It is believed to be the first study to provide biological evidence that lifelong musical experience has a good impact on the aging process. Kraus says the research shows that playing an instrument helps hearing and memory, which is among the most common complaints from normal aging.
  3. Exercise! Dr. Monika Fleshner, researcher/professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and contributor to “Calmer Waters,” has spent her career showing that exercise is vital to reducing stress and supporting healthy mental function. “Physically active individuals are stress robust,” says Fleshner. “They demonstrate both stress resistance and stress resilience.” Exercise seems to buffer many of the deleterious consequences of stress, including poor memory. Scientists have also found that exercise encourages the growth of new brain cells in the hippocampus, the area that is crucial to memory and learning.
  4. Say it out loud. When I meet someone for the first time, I inevitably look in the person’s eyes and don’t even listen to their spoken name. As a result, I rarely remember the person’s name. Next time, I will heed the expert advice of repeating the person’s name. This is considered the easiest way to remember everything from where you put your keys to your grocery list. Say it out loud to yourself, or mouth the words, in order to remember quickly.
  5. Get a good night’s sleep. According to a study published in the journal Neuroscience (June 30, 2005) sound sleep triggers changes in the brain that help to improve memory. New memories are formed within the brain when a person engages with information to be learned (for example, memorizing a list of words or mastering a piano concerto). However, these memories are initially fragile. In order to “stick” they must be solidified and improved. This process of “memory consolidation” occurs when connections between brain cells as well as between different brain regions are strengthened, and for many years was believed to develop merely as a passage of time. More recently, however, it has been demonstrated that time spent asleep also plays a key role in preserving memory. So, do your best to work on sleep hygiene. Unplug at least an hour before bed, soak in tub filled with Epsom salts, play soothing music, make sure the room is not too warm, etc. And, never go to bed mad.
  6. Doodle. In memory tests, doodlers performed 29% better than non-doodlers when asked to recall names and places, Experts say doodling doesn’t tax the mind and allows us to concentrate on the task at hand. It stops us daydreaming, too, which is distracting. The same theory holds for coloring in the beautiful new adult coloring books that have become popular the past several years.
  7. Learn something before bed. If you want to consolidate a memory go through the information right before you fall asleep. You’ll have few, if any, interfering memories so you’ll remember it the next day.
  8. Feed your neurotransmitters. These are the chemicals that allow your neurons to talk to one another. They are vital to memory, focus, learning, energy and happiness. Acetylcholine is the primary carrier of thought and memory, and if you don’t have enough of this important neurotransmitter, you will probably have memory and cognitive problems. For healthy acetylcholine production, make sure you’re getting the nutrients that it is made from. Dr. Dharma Singh Khalsa, author of Brain Longevity (Warner Books, Inc. 1997) and the president and medical director of the Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation in Tucson, Arizona, suggests supplementing with choline, which is present in high amounts in lecithin. Lecithin is available in capsule, granule, liquid, tablet and powder form. The recommended therapeutic dose is 2500 to 3000 mg. four times a day, for a total daily dose of 10,000 to 12,000 mg. In addition, it’s important to take 1000 mg. vitamin C, three times a day, along with 100 mg. of B5, which are needed to transform lecithin into acetylcholine. It’s also advisable to take B6 and zinc, which help in the synthesis of acetylcholine. The nutrient DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol) helps build acetylcholine levels. It is present in your brain in small quantities, and is also found in seafoods, including sardines. Since it is stimulating to the central nervous system, Dr. Khalsa suggests starting out with a low dose of about 40 mg. twice a day, and building up to 200 mg. daily, if you don’t feel overstimulated. 

 

 

 

 

 

10 Stress-relieving Holiday Tips for Caregivers

  1. Drink a glass of water every other hour to keep hydrated. Staying hydrated helps support immunity, and reduces stress and irritability. It’s important to remember that your brain needs water, too. A dehydrated brain doesn’t think clearly, which can contribute to stress and anxiety.
  2. Include a protein with every snack. It’s difficult to stay away from sweets this time of year. But including a protein with every snack helps maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Try apple slices smeared with almond butter or topped with a cheese slice. A small handful of almonds or walnuts and a couple of dates satisfy the sweet tooth and provides vitamins, minerals and protein.
  3. Plug in an aromatherapy diffuser and inhale the relaxing scent of lavender, nernoli (orange blossom) or any scent you like.
  4. Pour some Epsom salt into a hot bath, light a candle, put on soothing music, and soak away your stress and anxiety.
  5. Turn off the TV, phone, iPad, computer, and other electronic devices an hour before bed. Instead, listen to relaxing music while sipping a cup of chamomile tea.
  6. Journaling is a wonderful, inexpensive way to release your concerns and worries on paper. It’s available when your therapist and best friend are not, and you can do it anywhere at your leisure.
  7. Move your body. Exercise is one of the very best stress relievers. You don’t have to buy a special outfit or go to a gym. Put on a pair of walking shoes and make a habit of walking 1/2 hour every day. If it’s too cold outside, put on your favorite dance music and move as though no one is watching.
  8. Fill half of you plate with green leafy vegetables. They contain magnesium, “the mood mineral,” which supports healthy blood sugar and blood pressure, decreases food cravings, and nourishes and calms the nervous system.
  9. Laugh to reduce anxiety and produce endorphins, the feel-good hormone. Look at funny family photos, reminisce with a high school friend, or watch a comedy. Whatever tickles your funny bone will definitely lift your spirits.
  10. Aim to be in bed before 10pm and make a habit of going to bed and rising at the same time every time. You’ll sleep better and have more energy and resilience.